Front page

NStar outage snarls Cambridge during rush hour

Lights from a police cruiser lit up Harvard Yard Thursday during a power outage blamed on an NStar line failure.

YOON S. BYUN/GLOBE STAFF

An outage plunged a large swath of the city into darkness yesterday evening, including parts of Harvard and MIT.

The Old South Church is auctioning a book of psalms from the 17th century. It could fetch $10 to $20 million.

Church torn over future of precious asset

Members of Old South Church will vote Sunday on a proposal to sell a 17th century book to pay for church repairs and programming.

Mayor Thomas M. Menino showed a card from Boston schoolchildren at a press availability today.

Menino eager to return to City Hall

In his first interview since more than a month in the hospital, Mayor Thomas M. Menino didn’t address his political future.

Mass. Democrats oppose benefit cuts in fiscal-cliff talks

The Mass. House delegation is torn by wanting to avoid the shock that would result from expiration of Bush-era tax cuts and reluctance to change safety-net benefits.

The scene outside of Boylston Street Station following a Green Line trolley collision.

37 hurt in Green Line trolley crash

An operator of an outbound trolley slammed into another trolley at Boylston Street Station, sending 37 people to area hospitals.

The Nation

Mass. Democrats oppose benefit cuts in fiscal-cliff talks

Congressman Ed Markey.

By Christopher Rowland

The Mass. House delegation is torn by wanting to avoid the shock that would result from expiration of Bush-era tax cuts and reluctance to change safety-net benefits.

Ice sheets melting at poles faster than before

In May, this iceberg was off Greenland, where ice has been melting more quickly.

By Seth Borenstein

Fueled by global warming, polar ice sheets in Greenland and Antarctica are now melting three times faster than they did in the 1990s, a new scientific study says.

President George H.W. Bush in Texas hospital

Former President George H.W. Bush has been in and out of the hospital recently for complications resulting from bronchitis, Methodist Hospital said in a brief statement.

By MICHAEL GRACZYK

Former President George H.W. Bush, 88, was in a hospital Thursday for continuing treatment of a lingering cough.

The World

Palestinian state makes inroads

Palestinians celebrated in Ramallah after the General Assembly upgraded Palestine to a nonmember observer state.

By Ethan Bronner and Christine Hauser

More than 130 countries voted Thursday to upgrade Palestine to a nonmember observer state of the United Nations.

French court overturns Concorde crash conviction

By Greg Keller

A French appeals court Thursday overturned manslaughter convictions against Continental Airlines and a mechanic for the 2000 plane crash that killed 113.

Bangladesh factory owner voices regret

By Julhas Alam

The owner of a Bangladesh clothing factory where a fire killed 112 people says he was never informed the facility was required to have an emergency exit.

Editorial & Opinion

editorial

Egypt’s Morsi goes too far in defying Mubarak-era judges

Egyptian president Mohammed Morsi needs to find a graceful way to retract his heavy-handed decree.

Lawrence Harmon

Business leaders not bullish on mayoral race

By Lawrence Harmon

How likely is it that a business leader with no prior experience in elective office will emerge in Boston? And who are the credible contenders?

editorial | COCOANUT GROVE FIRE

Cocoanut Grove fire deserves a more prominent memorial

 The plaque includes a diagram of the nightclub.

The Cocoanut Grove fire is Boston’s equivalent of the Titanic disaster: An epic tragedy whose tremors are still being felt. It warrants a prominent exhibit.

Metro

NStar outage snarls Cambridge during rush hour

Lights from a police cruiser lit up Harvard Yard Thursday during a power outage blamed on an NStar line failure.

By Travis Andersen, Erin Ailworth and Colin A. Young

An outage plunged a large swath of the city into darkness yesterday evening, including parts of Harvard and MIT.

Menino eager to return to City Hall

Mayor Thomas M. Menino showed a card from Boston schoolchildren at a press availability today.

By Andrew Ryan

In his first interview since more than a month in the hospital, Mayor Thomas M. Menino didn’t address his political future.

Brian McGrory

Elizabeth Warren’s private agony

Senator-elect Elizabeth Warren and her dog, Otis, greeted a voter in September. Otis was diagnosed with lymphoma in the spring and died five days before the election.

By Brian McGrory

The senator-elect suffered the misery of ever loving a dog when Otis, her virtually inseparable companion, died five days before she made history in Massachusetts.

Business

Mass. boardrooms opening to women, slowly

By Katie Johnston

Six major companies added women to their previously all-male boards in 2012, contributing to a record 108 women board members at the state’s 100 largest public companies.

Boston Capital

Suitors vying for two Massachusetts hospitals

By Steven Syre

Lawrence General Hospital and Jordan Hospital in Plymouth are looking for bigger medical partners and expected to make decisions soon.

How strategic blunders helped derail the iconic Monitor Group

By Beth Healy

It would appear the Cambridge firm faltered from the very gaffe it has warned countless companies and nations against: getting “stuck in the middle” without a competitive advantage.

Obituaries

Jean Paul Carlhian, 92; architect taught at Harvard

JEAN PAUL CARLHIAN

By Bryan Marquard

Mr. Carlhian designed buildings that enlivened college campuses and the National Mall in Washington, D.C.

Erik Israelewicz, editorial director of French newspaper Le Monde

Mr. Izraelewicz this month.

By Eric Pfanner

Mr. Izraelewicz, 58, a former top editor at two French business dailies, had moved to overhaul Le Monde.

Patrick Edlinger, 52; excelled at competitive climbing

PATRICK EDLINGER

By William Yardley

Mr. Edlinger was a versatile and charismatic French rock climber who helped popularize competitive sport climbing in the 1980s.

Sports

Celtics’ Rajon Rondo suspended two games

Rajon Rondo heads off the court after being ejected from Wednesday night’s loss to Brooklyn.

By Amalie Benjamin

Banned now for the third time in 10 months, Rondo defended his actions and said he was “sticking up” for his teammates.

Christopher L. Gasper

No apologies from defiant Rajon Rondo

The Celtics will miss Rajon Rondo for two games during his suspension.

By Christopher L. Gasper

Rondo is a force of nature that can’t be controlled. That makes him a great point guard, but a questionable leader.

Patriots are turnover specialists

Devin McCourty’s touchdown sign signaled another score off a turnover for the Patriots as Alfonzo Dennard returned an interception for a score against the Colts on Nov. 18.

By Michael Whitmer

No NFL team is better at managing turnovers, an impressive trait that has helped the Patriots score at a record pace this season.

More Stories

BC’s Jerry York closing in on win record

By Nancy Marrapese-Burrell

on basketball

Doc Rivers sending message to Celtics

By Gary Washburn

Patriots Notebook

Patriots have to beware of Reggie Bush

By Michael Vega

Sports Media

Broadcasters found their voices at BC

By Chad Finn

Red Sox Notebook

Red Sox must decide on 11 players

By Peter Abraham

Falcons 23, Saints 13

Falcons humble Saints, Drew Brees

By Paul Newberry

college hockey notes

BU succeeds with freshman platoon in goal

By Nancy Marrapese-Burrell

The Bettor’s Edge

‘Feast Week’ results hard to swallow

By Ed Ryan

College Football Notebook

Notes: Tyrann Mathieu entering NFL draft

Louisville 20, Rutgers 17

Louisville defeats Rutgers, 20-17, earns BCS bid

By Ralph D. Russo

Blue Hills 26, Minuteman 8

Blue Hills wins Small School Vocational title

By Lorenzo Recupero

Gr. New Bedford 26, Gr. Lawrence 6

Greater New Bedford wins third straight title

By Patrick McHugh

G: Arts & Movies

art review

John Wilson: clear and present

Detail of “Father and Child,” a 1964 lithograph by John Wilson.

By Sebastian Smee

One of Boston’s most esteemed and accomplished artists gets a career retrospective.

Stage Review

A daughter’s tribute in ‘The Pianist of Willesden Lane’

Mona Golabek tells her mother’s story: refugee, concert pianist, emigre.

By Don Aucoin

The overall atmosphere created in this 90-minute solo show at the Paramount Center is one of quiet intimacy.

Classical Notes

David Finckel in last Boston concert with Emerson Quartet

The Emerson Quartet in New York in August: (from left) Eugene Drucker, Philip Setzer, David Finckel, and Lawrence Dutton.

By David Weininger

Finckel’s exit marks the group’s first personnel change in 34 years. He will be succeeded by British cellist Paul Watkins.

More Stories

Friday Preview | Movie Review

‘Killing Them Softly’ cast stands out

By Ty Burr

Noisy Neighbors

Casey Desmond, ‘Déjà Vu’

By James Reed

Night Watch

MMMMaven Project Graduation Dance Party

By Andrew Doerfler

Book Review

‘Lyrics & Prose’ by Ric Ocasek

By Mark Shanahan

Boston-area to do list

By June Wulff

Critic’s corner: Nov. 30

By Matthew Gilbert

Annie's Mailbox

Ask Amy column

Movie Stars

Movie capsules

Names

CEO discloses epilepsy

By Doug Most