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Front page

Grand jury sets sights on compounding pharmacy

A federal grand jury has begun investigating the Framingham company that made the tainted steroid injections blamed for at least three dozen deaths in seven states.

Timothy P. Cahill was questioned for a second day in his corruption trial.

Greg Derr/The Patriot Ledger/Pool

Cahill concedes campaign spoke with lottery ad firm

Former Treasurer Timothy P. Cahill acknowledged that his campaign had multiple contacts with the Boston ad firm that was being paid public money to craft lottery ads.

The fast-spreading fire that destroyed Cape Cod Bible Alliance Church was set just before 3 a.m. on Friday.

Church arson leaves Cape Cod uneasy

Parishioners of a Brewster church struggled to understand why someone set the blaze early Friday that destroyed the 25-year-old building.

A rendering depicts Government Center station after renovations.

Government Center T station to close for 2 years

An estimated $90 million renovation project at the City Hall Plaza stop is scheduled to start in the late summer or early fall.

Mass. push offers lesson on selling Obamacare

When it comes to winning over a skeptical or downright hostile public, lessons can be drawn from Massachusetts, health care advocates said.

The Nation

Mass. push offers lesson on selling Obamacare

By Tracy Jan

When it comes to winning over a skeptical or downright hostile public, lessons can be drawn from Massachusetts, health care advocates said.

‘Cliff’ talks at stalemate as Obama makes public appeal

President Obama spoke about the economy at a Rodon Group toy factory in Hatfield, Pa., where he lobbied Americans on his proposals.

By Lori Montgomery

Speaker John A. Boehner declared talks have reached a ‘‘stalemate,’’ as Obama insisted that tax rates on the wealthy must rise.

N.J. train derailment tips tankers, sickens dozens

A delicate operation lies ahead to remove the derailed tanker cars from Mantua Creek in Paulsboro, N.J.

By Geoff Mulvihill

The National Transportation Safety Board will try to decide whether the derailment was from a problem with the bridge.

The World

Egypt draft constitution sparks mass protest

By Maggie Michael

Protesters vowed to bring down a draft constitution approved by allies of President Mohammed Morsi.

Israel OK’s new West Bank settlement construction

A Palestinian laborer at a construction site in the West Bank Jewish settlement of Maale Adumim. Israel plans to build homes in the occupied West Bank and East Jerusalem.

By Aron Heller and Karin Laub

Israel approved the construction of 3,000 homes in Jewish settlements on Israeli-occupied lands, drawing swift condemnation from Palestinians.

EU not worthy to win Nobel Peace Prize, say three laureates

Archbishop Desmond Tutu won the prize in 1984 for his nonviolent struggle against apartheid.

By LOUISE NORDSTROM

Archbishop Desmond Tutu and two others have contested this year’s award to the EU, saying it contradicts the prize’s values because it relies on military force.

Editorial & Opinion

JOAN WICKERSHAM

An ideal holiday film

By Joan Wickersham

The problem with most Christmas movies is, well, Christmas. The 1957 film “Desk Set,” however, isn’t a Christmas movie, it just happens to occur between November and January.

editorial

Springfield blast shows need to replace aging gas pipelines

All it takes is an explosion at a strip club, and suddenly the underappreciated world of gas infrastructure is getting the attention it deserves.

Martin F. Nolan

Author George V. Higgins’s linguistic loot

 George V. Higgins’s novel “Cogan’s Trade” has been adapted into the film “Killing Them Softly.”

By Martin F. Nolan

In two dozen novels George Vincent Higgins, whose book “Cogan’s Trade” was recently made into the movie “Killing Them Softly,” transformed the mystery-thriller genre.

More Stories

editorial | SENATE BANKING COMMITTEE

A natural fit for Warren

Robert Kuttner

Why John Kerry shouldn’t be nominated

By Robert Kuttner

Letters | FACING DOWN CLIMATE CHANGE

Reducing carbon emissions will not be enough to turn tide

Letters | FACING DOWN CLIMATE CHANGE

With anti-science stance, GOP blocks progress

Letters | FACING DOWN CLIMATE CHANGE

Population growth weighs on world’s resources

Names

Rex Trailer saddles up for ‘Cowboy Spirit’ premiere

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Metro

Government Center T station to close for 2 years

A rendering depicts Government Center station after renovations.

By Matt Rocheleau

An estimated $90 million renovation project at the City Hall Plaza stop is scheduled to start in the late summer or early fall.

Church arson leaves Cape Cod uneasy

The fast-spreading fire that destroyed Cape Cod Bible Alliance Church was set just before 3 a.m. on Friday.

By Katheleen Conti and Derek J. Anderson

Parishioners of a Brewster church struggled to understand why someone set the blaze early Friday that destroyed the 25-year-old building.

Adrian Walker

Alexandra Zapp’s parents fight to prevent more tragedies

Since Zapp’s 2002 murder at the hands of a longtime sexual predator, her parents have been devoted to a single purpose: trying to stem the tide of sexual violence.

Business

Grand jury sets sights on compounding pharmacy

New England Compounding Center.

By Todd Wallack

A federal grand jury has begun investigating the Framingham company that made the tainted steroid injections blamed for at least three dozen deaths in seven states.

NStar faces scrutiny over power outages

By Erin Ailworth

NStar is facing more questions after Thursday’s outage in Cambridge, the latest in a string of disruptions this year caused by equipment failures.

TCBY will try again in Massachusetts

The self-serve model has helped revive business, according to a TCBY regional director.

By Laura Finaldi

TCBY plans to open 15 to 25 self-serve shops in the Boston area over the next few years, saying that giving customers more control has revived the business.

Obituaries

Bart Mulhern rose from messenger to head of home delivery at Globe

BART MULHERN

By Alli Knothe

Mulhern, 99, was so proud of the paper, he would deliver newspapers with his car when a truck broke down.

Alan Oser, NY Times real estate writer

By David W. Dunlap

Alan S. Oser, 81, covered real estate for the Times from 1969 through 2004, several years past his nominal retirement.

Motivational speaker Zig Ziglar, 86

Mr. Ziglar offered motivation and performance training.

By Jamie Stengle

Ziglar, who wrote more than 30 books on living a balanced life, aimed to help people achieve success.

Sports

Celtics 96, Blazers 78

Celtics show needed life minus Rondo

The Celtics’ Jeff Green (19 points) put on a show of strength against the Blazers on Friday.

By Gary Washburn

With Rajon Rondo serving the first of his two-game suspension, the Celtics responded with a stifling defensive performance in a 96-78 win.

BU 4, BC 2

BU hockey takes down No. 1 BC

Defenseman Matt Grzelcyk (5) was elated after giving BU a 3-1 lead in the third period, with Ahti Oksanen joining the Terriers’ celebration.

By Nancy Marrapese-Burrell

The ninth-ranked Terriers played their best game of the season in a 4-2 win over Boston College.

Patriots tight ends lining up for opportunity

Backup tight end Daniel Fells got on the field for a season-high 57 plays against the Jets.

By Shalise Manza Young

Rob Gronkowski’s absence has provided Daniel Fells and Visanthe Shiancoe an opportunity to play bigger roles. Michael Hoomanawanui also has contributed.

G: Family

He Saved Me, Too: the story of an unlikely friendship

Susan Kushner Resnick had a gold bracelet made, engraved with Aron Lieb’s camp numbers. They were friends for 15 years until his death last year.

By Bella English

A simple question launched a conversation between an elderly Holocaust survivor and a young mother that would last nearly 15 years and would, for both of them, become a lifeline.

How to behave when you’re at the theater

By June Wulff

Recently your focus might have been on table manners, but now it’s time to switch to theater manners during this season of nutcrackers and scrooges.

From the Archives

From Globe archives: Prohibition in Massachusetts

On Dec. 5, 1933, the 18th Amendment was repealed and Prohibition ended in the United States.