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Day-care worker charged in abuse was a sex offender

John Burbine, accused of sexually assaulting 13 children while working for his wife’s day care service, was a registered Level 1 sex offender with three convictions.

The fiscal cliff factored in Mike Napoli’s contract talks with the Red Sox.

Eye on ’13 tax bite, high earners seek to move up pay dates

The prospect of potentially higher taxes is driving big earners, from investors to new Sox first baseman Mike Napoli, to try to collect some of that money this year.

No single cause in state’s economic slowdown

Governor Patrick blamed the so-called fiscal cliff scare as a “direct cause” of the tamped-down tax collections, but other factors were apparent months before.

‘Worn out’ Frank ready to hit the lecture circuit

With his political career winding to a close in a matter of weeks, 72-year-old Barney Frank says he’s eager to begin a new chapter.

Emergency medical workers last week set up a triage operation on the sidewalk at the station to evaluate the passengers. The Boylston Street station was taped off after the collision.

MBTA driver in crash also worked overnight for BHA

The Green Line operator fired following last week’s crash had for years worked two full-time jobs without drawing scrutiny.

The Nation

‘Worn out’ Frank ready to hit the lecture circuit

By Tracy Jan

With his political career winding to a close in a matter of weeks, 72-year-old Barney Frank says he’s eager to begin a new chapter.

Gay Washington state couples get marriage licenses

David Mifflin and Matt Beebe took an oath for a marriage license in Seattle. Voters backed gay marriage last month.

By Manuel Valdes

Dozens of same-sex couples obtained marriage licenses in Wash. just hours after the governor signed a voter-approved law legalizing gay marriage.

New Orleans US attorney resigns amid scandal

By Sari Horwitz

The longest-serving US attorney in the country resigned amid an investigation into possible prosecutorial misconduct by two of his top deputies.

The World

Morsi offers little to quell crisis

Egyptian soldiers spread barbed wire near the presidential palace to secure the area against clashes between supporters and opponents of President Mohammed Morsi. The army has deployed tanks outside the presidential palace, following clashes between supporters and opponents of Morsi. The clashes have killed several people and wounded hundreds.

By David D. Kirkpatrick

The Egyptian president refused Thursday to call off a referendum on a disputed constitution that has sparked Egypt’s worst political crisis in two years.

Protestant militants attack Northern Ireland party offices

By SHAWN POGATCHNIK

The overnight violence in two Belfast suburbs came on the eve of Secretary of State Hillary Clinton’s planned visit on Friday to the capital of the British territory.

Taliban tries to kill new Afghan intelligence chief

By MATTHEW ROSENBERG, SANGAR RAHIMI and ALISSA J. RUBIN

The brazen attack left Asadullah Khalid seriously wounded and underscored the insurgency’s ability to go after those at the highest levels of the government.

Editorial & Opinion

Scot Lehigh

Reforms to help solve our fiscal problems

By Scot Lehigh

Time was, Massachusetts seemed to undergo alternating periods of fiscal famine and feast. No longer. That’s why policymakers need to make more money-saving reforms.

Joshua Green

Republican turmoil may take US over cliff

By Joshua Green

But Congress may fail to prevent the US falling over the fiscal cliff because of turmoil among House Republicans.

Carlo Rotella

Bluesy time for the blues

 Buddy Guy performing at the 2009 New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival.

By Carlo Rotella

Recent attention to the blues as a foundational American tradition is overdue, but it’s not a formula for a living popular genre to grow and change.

Metro

Day-care worker charged in abuse was a sex offender

John Burbine, a 49-year-old convicted sex offender, was indicted on charges he sexually abused at least 13 young children in the care of his wife's unlicensed child care service, and photographed and videotaped them.

By Peter Schworm and Travis Andersen

John Burbine, accused of sexually assaulting 13 children while working for his wife’s day care service, was a registered Level 1 sex offender with three convictions.

Brian McGrory

A bright life, a needless end

By Brian McGrory

It’s painful to even think about the death of Christopher Weigl, the Boston University graduate student, Eagle Scout, and bicyclist who died in a crash Thursday.

MBTA driver in crash also worked overnight for BHA

Emergency medical workers last week set up a triage operation on the sidewalk at the station to evaluate the passengers. The Boylston Street station was taped off after the collision.

By Eric Moskowitz

The Green Line operator fired following last week’s crash had for years worked two full-time jobs without drawing scrutiny.

More Stories

BU bicycle crash victim is remembered

By Katheleen Conti and Martine Powers

BROOKLINE

Three indicted in robberies of BU students

By Sarah N. Mattero

BOSTON

Second victim of Nov. 28 shooting dies

By Sarah N. Mattero

BOSTON

Man is shot on Homestead Street in Roxbury

By Travis Andersen

Globe Santa 

Comedians do a stand-up job to benefit Globe Santa

By Kathleen McKenna

Business

No single cause in state’s economic slowdown

By Megan Woolhouse

Governor Patrick blamed the so-called fiscal cliff scare as a “direct cause” of the tamped-down tax collections, but other factors were apparent months before.

Eye on ’13 tax bite, high earners seek to move up pay dates

The fiscal cliff factored in Mike Napoli’s contract talks with the Red Sox.

By Callum Borchers

The prospect of potentially higher taxes is driving big earners, from investors to new Sox first baseman Mike Napoli, to try to collect some of that money this year.

Boston Capital

Still battling over a sale gone bad

By Steven Syre

James and Janet Baker spent nearly two decades building the voice recognition software company Dragon Systems, only to see their fortune disappear in a puff of fraudulent smoke.

Obituaries

Rogina Jeffries, 53; former software engineer

ROGINA JEFFRIES

By Kathleen McKenna

Mrs. Jeffries combined interests in family and work, sciences and the arts, throughout her life.

Frank Barsalona, 74; helped organize British music invasion

Mr. Barsalona was considered the shrewdest booking agent in the ‘60s, working with the Beatles, Stones, and Hendrix.

By Paul Vitello

Mr. Barsalona, a New York talent agent, booked the first American concert tours of the Beatles and the Rolling Stones.

Joanthan Harvey, 73, British composer

HARVEY

By Robert Barr

Mr. Harvey’s operas and other works delved into spirituality.

Sports

Dan Shaughnessy

Red Sox moving in right direction

General manager Ben Cherington signed autographs last Saturday before going to Nashville to sign new free agents like Mike Napoli and Shane Victorino.

By Dan Shaughnessy

This nattering nabob of negativity is happy to see the Sox overpaying for B-level players with A-plus money, if they are building for the future.

Despite critics, Red Sox happy with moves

By Nick Cafardo

If the criterion for “winning” the Winter Meetings is being active and aggressive, the Red Sox can make a case for victory.

Jack Taylor’s 138-point game part of ‘the system’

Jack Taylor isn’t shy about shooting — he took 108 field goal attempts in his 138-point game last month.

By Stan Grossfeld

Taylor became the buzz of the sports world for his NCAA-record performance, and his Division 3 team thrives on record-breaking moments.

G: Arts & Movies

G Cover Story

Blowing the dust off ‘Our Town’

“Our Town” director David Cromer says the meaning of the Thornton Wilder play has often been misunderstood.

By Christopher Wallenberg

In the 74 years since Thornton Wilder’s landmark “Our Town” premiered on Broadway, the fictional village of Grover’s Corners, N.H., has become a familiar place.

Art Review

‘Jane Lund: Home Body’ at Danforth Museum

Jane Lund’s painting of artist Gregory Gillespie’s wife, Fran, alongside the Mexican painter Frida Kahlo with a mustachioed Gillespie and Kahlo’s lover, Diego Rivera, both posing as the angels from Raphael’s “Sistine Madonna and her Angels.”

By Sebastian Smee

Every now and then you see work so simultaneously awful and wonderful, that, like the skin of a relocated chameleon, you feel your critical criteria changing color in its presence.

Classical Notes

How Glenn Gould reinvented Bach

Canadian pianist Glenn Gould (in an undated photo) first recorded Bach’s Goldberg Variations in 1955.

By David Weininger

When the recording of Bach’s Goldberg Variations was released in 1956, it changed all expectations with which listeners approached Bach’s keyboard music.

More Stories

Stages

‘Of Mice and Men’ and Moonbox

By Joel Brown

Friday Preview | MOVIE REVIEW

‘My Worst Nightmare’ a dream union of high art and sleaze?

By Wesley Morris

MOVIE STARS

Movie capsules

Book Review

‘Cézanne: A Life’ by Alex Danchev

By Roger Atwood

TELEVISION REVIEW

‘Restless’: World War II spying, 1970s reprise

By Matthew Gilbert

Noisy Neighbors

Pressure Cooker, ‘Wherever You Go’

By Scott McLennan

Night Watch

Gallery with Soul Clap’s Eli Goldstein

By Jessica Teich

events

Boston-area to do list

By June Wulff

Annie's Mailbox

Ask Amy column

Dear Margo

Dear Margo column

Names

Kevin Youkilis in Boston for fund-raiser

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

Casey Affleck working on film about Boston Strangler

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

Mark Wahlberg, ex-NHLer Tie Domi in a ‘fighting’ mood

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein