Front page

Boston judge got free aid worth $85,000

A prominent law firm paid for Judge Raymond Dougan’s defense as he successfully fought a bias complaint from the Suffolk district attorney.

Melanie Steier does not allow her son, Harrison, to play violent games.

Violent video games put parental judgment to test

Many parents say their aversion to the games intensified in the wake of the Newtown, Conn., killings, and a report the shooter played games like Call of Duty.

Members of the Bruins worked out with players from the BU hockey team at the school on Monday.

David L Ryan/Globe Staff

Bruins’ Andrew Ference was key in NHL talks

The defenseman’s role as union activist might ultimately trump his actions on the ice as a player.

Surge in federal approvals buoys drug makers

The pace of US drug approvals is picking up after a relative dry spell.

President Obama’s pick to lead the Pentagon, Chuck Hagel, and Senator John Kerry, nominee for secretary of state, share a history of service in Vietnam.

In Chuck Hagel and John Kerry, a wariness of war

President Obama’s Cabinet picks share a history of service in Vietnam and a cautious approach to the use of military force.

The Nation

In Chuck Hagel and John Kerry, a wariness of war

President Obama’s pick to lead the Pentagon, Chuck Hagel, and Senator John Kerry, nominee for secretary of state, share a history of service in Vietnam.

By Bryan Bender

President Obama’s Cabinet picks share a history of service in Vietnam and a cautious approach to the use of military force.

A calm suspect amid the chaos at Colo. theater

In this July 23, 2012 file photo, James E. Holmes appeared in Arapahoe County District Court in Centennial, Colo.

By Jack Healy and Dan Frosch

A court hearing for suspect James E. Holmes furnished a first airing of police details about last year’s shooting rampage at a Colorado movie theater.

Military pay due to discharged gays

About 180 gay and lesbian former military service members who were discharged due to their homosexuality will receive the rest of their severance pay.

The World

Indian judge bars reporters from gang rape trial

A Delhi police van thought to be transporting men accused in a New Delhi gang rape left a city court Monday.

By Niharika Mandhana

A magistrate banned reporting on the New Delhi trial of a gang rape case that has attracted worldwide attention.

Hacking trial begins for UK detective

Detective Chief Inspector April Casburn denies her charge.

Detective Chief Inspector April Casburn is charged with misconduct for allegedly phoning News of the World and offering information about its stalled hacking investigation.

4 Mexico deaths blamed on wild dogs

By Olga R. Rodriguez

Wild dogs mauled and killed four people whose bodies were found over the past two weeks in a park on the edge of Mexico City.

Editorial & Opinion

farah stockman

Medical promised land

Doctors at Boston Children’s Hospital have been treating Almas (foreground) and Abdulallah Alhazmi for rare conditions.

By Farah Stockman

A Saudi Arabian family has come to Boston, home to some of the world’s leading medical researchers, for a cure for their children.

JOANNA WEISS

Internet shifts rape stigma to perpetrators

Anonymous, whose members often wear Guy Fawkes masks, has taken on the Steubenville, Ohio, rape controversy.

By Joanna Weiss

The group Anonymous, a collection of hackers, is using its set of Internet tools to draw attention to the alleged rape of a 16-year-old girl in Steubenville, Ohio.

paul mcmorrow

Banks dodge accountability for financial collapse

By Paul M. McMorrow

The collapse is receding into history, but as a recent filing in a Manhattan courtroom shows, victims of the financial meltdown still feel its effects, years removed from the crisis itself.

Metro

Boston judge got free aid worth $85,000

Judge Dougan serves in Boston Municipal Court.

By Andrea Estes

A prominent law firm paid for Judge Raymond Dougan’s defense as he successfully fought a bias complaint from the Suffolk district attorney.

High-tech Dreamliner grounded by small fire

 Firefighters checked out the area where a small fire broke out on a Boeing 787 Dreamliner at Logan Airport Monday. The fire knocked out Boston’s only nonstop flight to Asia.

By Eric Moskowitz and Katie Johnston

Smoke from a battery in the plane’s underbelly filled the cabin after passengers had disembarked at Logan Airport.

City Council reelects Stephen Murphy as leader

Stephen J. Murphy

By Andrew Ryan

Murphy will be first in the line of succession if Mayor Thomas M. Menino, 70, leaves office before his term expires at the end of the 2013.

More Stories

Kevin Cullen

Judging the judge in the Whitey Bulger case

By Kevin Cullen

Driver with an 11-page record held after ninth OUI

By Peter Schworm and John R. Ellement

FRAMINGHAM

Framingham resident charged with animal abuse

By Haven Orecchio-Egresitz

Somerville

Three arrested after shots are fired

By Jeremy C. Fox

$140k penalty for data breach

By Chelsea Conaboy

8 arrested in Westborough for Keystone XL protest

By Travis Andersen, Jeremy C. Fox and Todd Feathers

Business

Surge in federal approvals buoys drug makers

By Robert Weisman

The pace of US drug approvals is picking up after a relative dry spell.

Brown Brothers moving to Post Office Square

An architect’s image of what the renovated 50 Post Office Square building will look like.

By Casey Ross

Brown Brothers Harriman & Co., the oldest privately held financial institution in the US, is moving to a historic building in Boston’s Financial District.

Meals for medical clients back on the table

Restaurants like Cinquecento in the South End saw business fall off because of the 2008 ban on pharmaceutical company meals.

By Sarah Shemkus

Drug companies are once again taking doctors out for meals, a move that pleases restaurants and worries health advocates.

Obituaries

Klemens von Klemperer, Smith professor, historian who wrote of resistance to Nazism

After he served as an intelligence officer in the US Army, Klemens von Klemperer earned a doctorate from Harvard.

By Dennis Hevesi

Professor von Klemperer, 96, was a refugee from Nazi Germany who wrote what is widely considered the seminal history of the movement to overthrow Hitler.

Rebecca Tarbotton, 39, environmental activist

Ms. Tarbotton’s group challenged the practices of big corporations.

By William Yardley

Ms. Tarbotton helped persuade big banks to stop financing mountaintop removal mining and Disney to reduce its use of paper made from trees cut down in rain forests.

Sports

Alabama 42, Notre Dame 14

Alabama wins 2d straight BCS title

Alabama quarterback AJ McCarron lifts the BCS championship trophy not long after he unloaded four touchdown passes.

By Paul Newberry

AJ McCarron and the Crimson Tide rolled top-ranked Notre Dame, 42-14, and took control of the game from the very first drive.

Christopher L. Gasper

Alabama proves SEC’s dominance

Nick Saban hoisted the BCS trophy for the third time in four years.

By Christopher L. Gasper

In routing a Notre Dame team that was way below its level, Alabama showed why it should be considered the NFL’s unofficial 33d team.

Celtics 102, Knicks 96

Celtics send a message to Knicks with win

Kevin Garnett blocked this shot from Carmelo Anthony. The Knicks star jawed with Garnett during — and after — the game.

By Gary Washburn

Playing without a suspended Rajon Rondo, the Celtics beat the Knicks in their most difficult road challenge of the season.

G: Living

G Cover

Looking at the sky may change your entire POV

Low-altitude stratus clouds.

By Jan Brogan

Former Boston TV reporter Jack Borden is on a mission to educate people about sky awareness.

Stage Review

Paula Plum’s artistry gives needed lift to ‘33 Variations’

James Andreassi plays Beethoven and Paula Plum is a musicologist struggling against Lou Gehrig’s disease in Lyric Stage’s “33 Variations.’’

By Don Aucoin

Paula Plum’s performance at Lyric Stage Company manages to transcend the limitations of an ambitious but deeply flawed and erratic play.

Television Review

‘Joe Schmo’: a pawn in their game

Spike’s “The Joe Schmo Show” leads a gullible man to believe that he’s competing to be a bounty hunter on a reality TV show.

By Matthew Gilbert

The Spike reality show that drops an unsuspecting person into a completely fake reality competition is back after a nine-year absence.

More Stories

Television Review

‘Washington Heights’ keeps it a little too real

By Matthew Gilbert

Art Review

Miniature, loving commemorations

By Cate McQuaid

Book Review

‘Driver’s Education’ by Grant Ginder

By Karen Campbell

MOVIE STARS

Movie Stars

Events

Boston-area to do list

By Milva DiDomizio

Tuesday night television

Critic’s corner: What’s on TV tonight

By Matthew Gilbert

Annie's Mailbox

Ask Amy column

Names

Mark Wahlberg attends Chicago screening

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

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Boston’s Marin Hinkle talks about ‘Deception’

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

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Maura Tierney joins Tom Hanks in ‘Lucky Guy’

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

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LA Philharmonic leader a big fan of Aerosmith

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

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Browne, Spalding will play Tanglewood

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

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Boston Globe column sets Texans’ star atwitter

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

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Golden Globes party in Los Angeles

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein