Front page

President Obama still talks of change in 2d term

The mood in advance of President Obama’s second inaugural is rooted more in reality and a sense of limits.

“I’m not as excited as I was four years ago but maybe it’ll be different,” Elysander Plaza said. “Because of that experience the first time, I can never stop being inspired.”

Suzanne Kreiter / Globe Staff (left)

Four years later, reflections on a historic inaugural

The Globe followed up with some Obama supporters to see how they feel about the president today, and what the second inaugural means to them.

Tom Brady is closing in on the Muhammad Ali/Michael Jordan pantheon.

Jim Davis/Globe Staff

Dan Shaughnessy

Is Tom Brady the best QB ever?

Brady has vaulted past career-long rival Peyton Manning, and can solidify the title of greatest QB in history with two more victories.

Three titans contending for Boston-area casino license

The battle for casino development rights in Greater Boston has all the elements of can’t-miss public theater.

The Nation

President Obama still talks of change in 2d term

By Matt Viser

The mood in advance of President Obama’s second inaugural is rooted more in reality and a sense of limits.

Four years later, reflections on a historic inaugural

“I’m not as excited as I was four years ago but maybe it’ll be different,” Elysander Plaza said. “Because of that experience the first time, I can never stop being inspired.”

By Tracy Jan

The Globe followed up with some Obama supporters to see how they feel about the president today, and what the second inaugural means to them.

POLITICAL NOTEBOOK

Visitors flood D.C. for presidential inauguration

President Obama and his wife, Michelle, stained a bookshelf at Burrville Elementary in Washington. To honor Martin Luther King Jr., Obama designated Saturday a national day of service.

By Sheryl Gay Stolberg

Tens of thousands of visitors streamed into the capital city this weekend as organizers prepared for President Obama’s inauguration.

The World

Algerian hostage crisis ends violently

Algerians escorted a freed Norwegian hostage at a police station in Amenas on Saturday. A government official said security forces were making sure no kidnappers were hiding.

By Adam Nossiter

Algerian forces ended a standoff with Islamist extremists at a natural gas complex that left at least 23 hostages dead and killed all 32 militants.

Jihadists gain hold after death of Khadafy

By Robert F. Worth

North Africa is turning into another zone of dangerous instability, much like Syria, site of an increasingly bloody civil war.

Islamists flee crucial Mali town

By Baba Ahmed

Radical Islamists have fled a key Malian town after French airstrikes that began after they seized it nearly one week ago.

Editorial & Opinion

Peter S. Canellos

An inaugural speech worth waiting for?

President Obama before giving his first inaugural speech.

By Peter S. Canellos

President Obama’s ability to express himself at his second inauguration will indicate whether he’ll be able to transcend battles with Congress and really make his case to the people.

JOAN VENNOCHI

Patrick’s expensive legacy

By Joan Vennochi

Governor Deval Patrick wants to be remembered for new and improved roads, trains, bridges and schools, but he’ll need courage from fellow lawmakers to raise the revenue.

Farah Stockman

Why did the smartest guys in the room go bankrupt?

By Farah Stockman

There are many reasons why the Monitor Group, an elite Cambridge-based consulting firm that sold expensive advice, went bankrupt.

Metro

Yvonne Abraham

Sounds of progress at English High

By Yvonne Abraham

Halfway through a make-or-break school year for the embattled school there is a promising sign: Boston’s English High School has a drumline.

Tossed-out Christmas trees’ tales only half over

Christmas trees like the one at top picked up by Boston trash collectors in West Roxbury eventually end up on a giant compost pile in Mattapan.

By Billy Baker

More than 100 tons of trees are gathered from curbs around Boston and brought to the city’s composting site, where they wait to be chopped up by a giant grinder.

Three titans contending for Boston-area casino license

By Mark Arsenault

The battle for casino development rights in Greater Boston has all the elements of can’t-miss public theater.

Money & Careers

Henri Termeer isn’t exactly settling into retirement

Henri Termeer led Genzyme until 2011 and still keeps a high profile.

By Robert Weisman

Not content to rest on his laurels, the former Genzyme chief is staying busy as a tireless advocate for the Mass. biotech industry.

Sovereign latest bank to roll out new fees on accounts

By Todd Wallack

Banks across Mass. and the country have come up with new and creative ways to squeeze profits from their depositors.

Innovation Economy

Restaurants are a tough sell for tech start-ups

The Toast app makes it simple to split the bill when you’re out with a group. But for now, you can only try it at one restaurant.

By Scott Kirsner

Many food-focused entrepreneurs have discovered just how difficult it can be to introduce new technologies in the industry.

Sports

Dan Shaughnessy

Is Tom Brady the best QB ever?

Tom Brady is closing in on the Muhammad Ali/Michael Jordan pantheon.

By Dan Shaughnessy

Brady has vaulted past career-long rival Peyton Manning, and can solidify the title of greatest QB in history with two more victories.

Ravens’ Ray Lewis won’t be forgotten

Ray Lewis was jailed and went to trial for a double-murder in 2001; the perennial Pro Bowler turned his life around and was Super Bowl MVP a year after the trial, and is now in what he calls his “last ride’’; Lewis (right), at his Charity Bowling Tournament, is a beloved figure in Baltimore.

By Julian Benbow

In an era obsessed with legacy, the Baltimore linebacker’s will be a complex one.

Bruins 3, Rangers 1

Bruins open with win over Rangers

Chris Bourque (left) and Rich Peverley give Tuukka Rask props after his 20-save effort propelled the Bruins to a season-opening win.

By Fluto Shinzawa

Tuukka Rask turned back 20 of 21 shots as the Bruins opened their 48-game season against the Rangers with a 3-1 win.

More Stories

Sunday Football Notes

Patriots should edge Ravens in AFC title game

By Greg A. Bedard

On hockey

Bruins looked in midseason form in opener

By Kevin Paul Dupont

On Second Thought

Boxing returns to Causeway Street for a night

By Kevin Paul Dupont

Sunday Hockey Notes

Taking things into account as NHL season begins

By Kevin Paul Dupont

Sunday Baseball Notes

Red Sox hope to do better with trades

By Nick Cafardo

Sunday Basketball Notes

Report on Billy Hunter gives union food for thought

By Gary Washburn

Patriots notebook

Matthew Slater earns special praise from Bill Belichick

By Shalise Manza Young

RAVENS NOTEBOOK

Ravens rookie kicker has handled the pressure

By John Powers

Bruins notebook

Bruins owner Jeremy Jacobs envisions NHL flourishing

By Kevin Paul Dupont and Fluto Shinzawa

Ravens at Patriots, 6:30 p.m., CBS

Patriots’ keys to a victory vs. Ravens

By Jim McBride

Celtics notebook

Celtics unhappy with call late in loss to Bulls

By Gary Washburn

What They Were Thinking

Shane Vereen explains his TD catch

By Stan Grossfeld

SCHOOL ROUNDUP

Roundup: Beverly boys too much for Swampscott

By Alex Hall

GWU 79, UMass 76

UMass falls at home to George Washington

By Jeff Wagenheim

Memphis 60, Harvard 50

Memphis keeps Harvard at bay in win

By Clay Bailey

UMass-Lowell 4, BU 3

BU is latest victim in UMass-Lowell’s run

By Nancy Marrapese-Burrell

women’s college basketball roundup

Alford, BU women earn 13th win in row

49ers at Falcons , 3 p.m., Fox

Falcons, 49ers aim for same destination

By Paul Newberry

DIV. 2 MSTCA STATE RELAY MEET

Woburn boys get meet record, Division 2 title

By Sarah Moomaw

Ideas

Ideas

The gun toll we’re ignoring: suicide

Each gun represents 100 deaths by firearm in 2010.

By Leon Neyfakh

You wouldn’t know it from the national debate, but most American firearm deaths aren’t murder.

You patented it, you own it? Not so fast

By Robin Feldman

To free up American innovation, it’s time to rethink a crucial corner of the law.

How digital art decays—and how to save it

By Simon Waxman

A team of curators takes up the challenge of preserving computer art.

More Stories

The Word

All the president’s words

By Ben Zimmer

Brainiac

The slime mold says turn left

By Kevin Hartnett

Uncommon Knowledge

Does your newborn know English?

By Kevin Lewis

Books

Cartoonist and fiction maven

Roz Chast

Roz Chast will speak at Sanders Theater on Friday evening.

By Amy Sutherland

The fail-to-thrive characters of Roz Chast’s cartoons have been cracking people up since 1978 when The New Yorker started publishing her work.

Katharine Whittemore

Six books examine the decline of the American middle class

A crowd listens during a “Join the Action” press conference on the “fiscal cliff” at Capitol Hill this past December.

By Katharine Whittemore

These books that look at the decline of the middle class focus on economic inequality, special interest groups, and the political system.

Meredith goldstein

More reimaginings of literary classics on tap

By Meredith Goldstein

The success of young adult reimaginings of “Cinderella,” “Peter Pan,” and “Robin Hood” is giving way to a fresh crop of new takes on old stories in 2013.

Obituaries

Stan Musial, 92; one of the greatest hitters in baseball

When Stan Musial retired in 1963, he held or shared 17 major league records.

By Mark Feeney

“Stan the Man” was the National League’s preeminent player in the decade after World War II and played outfield and first base for the Cardinals for 22 seasons.

Earl Weaver, 82, influential, combative Orioles manager

Earl Weaver disagreed with a call by Steve Palermo during a game in 1979. He also disagreed with being ejected again.

By Bruce Weber

The Hall of Fame manager led the team to five 100-win seasons, four pennants, and the 1970 World Series championship.

Arts & Movies

Asian Art at the Museum of Fine Arts

From left: The Bettina Burr conservator, Joan Wright and associate conservator of Japanese paintings Tanya Uyeda worked on a Japanese art piece.

By Sebastian Smee

The MFA is famous around the world for its Asian collection, but a flurry of recent activity has attracted renewed attention to the museum’s Asian treasures.

Orchestra brings Beethoven, Middle East discussion to Symphony Hall

Daniel Barenboim conducted the West-Eastern Divan Orchestra, whose musicians come from across the Middle East and have grown up amid conflict.

By Geoff Edgers

Daniel Barenboim’s West-Eastern Divan Orchestra features musicians from Algeria, Egypt, Israel, Jordan, Lebanon, Palestine, Syria, and Turkey.

New ‘Sister Act’ moves to disco

Hollis Resnik stars as Mother Superior and Ta’Rea Campbell stars as Deloris, a budding disco star, in the stage musical “Sister Act.”

By Joel Brown

Fans of the 1992 “Sister Act” movie starring Whoopi Goldberg will find the touring musical coming to the Opera House this week moves to a different beat.

Travel

A journey to find real Seoul food

A pagoda at Changdeokgung Palace, which dates to the 15th century.

By Joe Ray

Korean food is having its international moment, particularly in the United States. A trip to Seoul allowed for sampling of the cuisine directly from its source.

Arts and artists in the Berkshires

Melanie Mowinski stood near the fully automated Vandercook press, at PRESS in North Adams.

By Necee Regis

Dozens of artists work and exhibit in reclaimed storefronts in North Adams, a town that is home to the Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art (Mass MoCA).

Past and present interweave in Franco-American Manchester

Amoskeag Mill No. 3 has been repurposed.

By Patricia Harris and David Lyon

The French-Canadian heritage of this former mill town comes through its cuisine and is documented in the American-Canadian Genealogical Society’s library.

Magazine

Magazine

My friend Tito

By Dan Shaughnessy

Globe sports columnist Dan Shaughnessy recounts how he and former Red Sox manager Terry Francona buried the hatchet and teamed up to pen a revealing book

5 memorable games during Francona’s tenure

July 24, 2004: The Yankees’ Alex Rodriguez and Sox catcher Jason Varitek traded blows in the 3rd inning of a game that featured 27 hits, nine relief pitchers, four errors, and this photo-op for the ages. Both players were ejected from the game.

By Dan Shaughnessy

Terry Francona managed the Red Sox from 2004 to 2011; here are the highs and one miserable low.

Teaching veterans to be mental health workers

By Chelsea Conaboy

Many military men and women are coming home with a slate of mental health needs. Are other veterans the best people to treat these troubled vets?

More Stories

Perspective

The young and the restless

By Alexander Heffner

Soundtrack

Walden Pond’s winter wonder

By Scott Helman

Out and About

As seen around town

Style Watch

Pretty palettes warm up winter

By Tina Sutton

Miss Conduct

Hold your fire

By Robin Abrahams

Cooking

Pasta with nuts three ways

By Adam Ried

Dinner With Cupid

Opposites, in fact

Connections

The boy who adopted me

By Paul E. Fallon

Tales From the City

Do cats do chores in Dedham?

Globe North

Local children send letters to the president

Fourth-grader Aileen Arias, 9, at South Lawrence East Elementary School, begins her letter to President Obama as part of Mail to the Chief program. Letters written at Newburyport’s Molin School (below) and South Lawrence East (bottom) are serious and supportive.

By Christina Jedra

Kristen Ando’s fourth-graders at South Lawrence East sat quietly in their seats, turning their wishes for change in the into letters to President Obama.

Wilmington

Appeal filed on school project

By Kathy McCabe

Officials planned to more forward with the construction of Wilmington High School despite allegations it would harm drinking water.

Swampscott

Official pushes for pension change

By David Rattigan

An article that may come before Town Meeting seeks to allow Swampscott to change its pension plan for new employees.

More Stories

Who taught YOU to drive?

Curious tow trucks to coveted license plates

By Peter DeMarco

Everett

Fire union locked in contract battle

By John Laidler

High School Basketball

Wakefield boys’ keep up dogged defense

By Pat Bradley

Suburban Diary

When Daddy gets sick

By Rob Azevedo

Dining out

Chicken pot pies north of Boston

By Kathy Shiels Tully

Business group gets underway

By G. Jeffrey MacDonald

Burlington

Commission resumes wetlands bylaw hearing

By John Laidler

Melrose

Kindergarten information night Thursday

By Kathy McCabe

Reading

5K Treadmill Trot benefits YMCA

By Brenda J. Buote

Somerville

High school to compete in WGBH TV quiz show

By Jarret Bencks

Stoneham

Theater welcomes new managing director

By Brenda J. Buote

Winchester

Second annual business expo Feb. 12

By Brenda J. Buote

Andover

Nominations for Preservation Awards

By Brenda J. Buote

Beverly

Kindergarten registration slated for this week

By Steven A. Rosenberg

Danvers

High school expansion in second phase

By John Laidler

Gloucester

Library hires tech-savvy assistant director

By David Rattigan

Hamilton-Wenham

Contenders for principal job to visit high school

By David Rattigan

Lawrence

Four arrested in heroin and weapons bust

By Karen Sackowitz

Marblehead

Marblehead festival selects news logo

By Steven A. Rosenberg

Middleton

Free flu vaccinations available

By David Cogger

Newburyport

New photography club captures nature

By Brenda J. Buote

Rockport

High school to compete in WGBH quiz show

By David Rattigan

West Newbury

Animal control officer to be shared

By Taryn Plumb

Westford

Third-quarter tax bill due Feb. 1

By Brenda J. Buote

Merrimack, N.H.

Hearing to determine Fire Department changes

By Tom Long

Globe South

Book Review

‘The Inventor and the Tycoon’ by Edward Ball

Edward Muybridge’s images of horses in motion answered tycoon Leland Stanford’s (right) question: Does a galloping horse ever lift all four hooves off the ground at the same time?

By Dan Cryer

Ball brilliantly fused the stories of photographer Edward Muybridge and railroad tycoon Leland Stanford, who partnered in a revolution that neither had foreseen.

Brockton

All in this together

Clockwise from left: Worshipers exit a service at First Lutheran; Agnes Adepoju is anointed by the Rev. Moses O. Sowale at Grace Chapel Episcopal/Anglican Ministry.; Pastor Steve Rahn speaks to members of Grace Church; Marie Josee Lynch sings at Haitian Church of God.

By Emily Sweeney

Four congregations share a single church building. But despite the occasional inconveniences, the arrangement has been a positive one.

Four churches under one roof in Brockton

By Emily Sweeney

Four Brockton congregations share a common bond: They all worship in the same building at 900 Main St.

More Stories

West Bridgewater

Texting patrols lauded, scarce

By Christine Legere

Flight pioneers look back

By Jennette Barnes

MLK events

By Compiled Anne Steele

Kingston

Residents criticize inaction on turbines

By Christine Legere

Holbrook

Charter voted down

By Jennette Barnes

Foxborough

Library fund campaign goes public

By Michele Morgan Bolton

Beverly Beckham

Keep it quiet in the theater

By Beverly Beckham

Dining Out

Pub grub with ambience

By Shirley Goh

people

Playing to the home crowd

By Paul E. Kandarian

High School Basketball

A hoop dream comes true

By Tim Healey

Abington

Search underway for next town manager

By Jim Morrison

Randolph

Fegan chosen for School Committee post

By Jim Morrison

Braintree

Interim fire chief selected

By Jessica Bartlett

Pembroke

Ideas for community center sought

By John Laidler

Duxbury

Selectmen seek to end pay

By Sarah Coffey

Rockland

Sharps disposal and flu clinic

By Emily Files

Cohasset

Full moon stroll at Holly Hill Farm

By Johanna Seltz

Hanover

Networking over breakfast

By Meg Murphy

Hingham

Art appraisal day

By Jessica Bartlett

Hull

Museum issues call for artwork

By Johanna Seltz

Holbrook

Trash case sent back to Planning Board

By Jennette Barnes

Weymouth

Workshop for new homebuyers

By Johanna Seltz

Marshfield

Master plan details online

By Jennette Barnes

Milton

Joyce receives Beacon of Justice award

By Dave Eisenstadter

Plymouth

Pikes, muskets, and militiamen

By Emily Sweeney

Cohasset

Selectwoman faces ethics review

By Johanna Seltz

Scituate

South Shore Seafood Exchange event

By Jessica Bartlett

Avon

Special Town Meeting in February

By Johanna Seltz

Bridgewater

Bridgewater State holds winter commencement

By Christine Legere

Carver

School news on your phone

By Robert Knox

Foxborough

STEM Teacher of the Year award nomination

By Michele Morgan Bolton

Halifax

Tax preparation help for seniors

By Christine Legere

Lakeville

Town updating rail protection areas

By Paul E. Kandarian

Mattapoisett

Band concert fund-raiser

By Paul E. Kandarian

Norton

New playground to open

By Jennette Barnes

Easton

Two selectmen will not seek another term

By Michele Morgan Bolton

Canton

Exhibition of owl art

By Dave Eisenstadter

East Bridgewater

Town settles suit over drug testing

By Sarah Coffey

Plympton

Town politicians get busy

By Meg Murphy

Raynham

Longtime health agent leaves

By Christine Legere

Rochester

Solar array gets approval

By Paul E. Kandarian

Sharon

Town’s flu vaccine exhausted

By Jennette Barnes

Stoughton

State education officials to visit

By Rich Fahey

Walpole

Knitters needed at senior center

By Johanna Seltz

Wareham

WCTV releases special MLK video

By Emily Sweeney

Westwood

Nonprofit seeking auction items

By Michele Morgan Bolton

Brockton

Streelight purchase to save money

By Michele Morgan Bolton

Plainville

Town property assessments available for review

By Rachel Lebeaux

Globe West

Winter markets spring up west of Boston

At Brookline’s winter market, Jenn Engstrom buys a bag of Mexican chocolate almonds early this month from Eric Doyle of Q’s Nuts. She just moved to Brookline from Michigan and happened upon the market.

By Brock Parker

Several new local winter farmers markets have launched this season, joining those founded four years ago in Natick and Wayland.

MILFORD

Late bid revives casino debate

The plan described to Milford officials months ago called for an $850 million complex that would feature a 350-room hotel, and 60,000 square feet of restaurants and retail shops.

By Lisa Kocian

The last-minute application by a developer to build a casino along Interstate 495 in Milford has galvanized both opponents and supporters.

NEWTON

Details emerge in police egging

By Deirdre Fernandes

It was just before 2 a.m. when loud banging noises outside his Framingham home jolted the police sergeant awake.

More Stories

Belmont

Historic church slated to be razed

By Evan Allen

Hopkinton

Schools seeking leader yet again

By Ellen Ishkanian

Westborough

Tax plan helps lure Newton company

By Calvin Hennick

Former judge worked for voting rights

By G. Jeffrey MacDonald

Sudbury

Board change up for vote

By Jennifer Lefferts

High School Basketball

Confidence and control on the court

By Phil Perry

Newton

League backs mayor’s tax override package

By Deirdre Fernandes

Waltham

Parking ban melts away, for now

By Jaclyn Reiss

Waltham

Duck sightseeing tour next weekend

By Jaclyn Reiss

Natick

High school indoor track open

By Jaclyn Reiss

Hopkinton

Housing Authority vacancy announced

By Ellen Ishkanian

Medfield

Free class in Social Media Strategies Tuesday

By Laurem MacCarthy

Southborough

New trail committee seeking members

By Jennifer Roach

Upton

Upton town manager’s contract renewed

By Lauren MacCarthy

Holliston

Medical "sharps" disposal program

By Ellen Ishkanian

Framingham

Go ahead, park on the odd side

By Jaclyn Reiss

Defying the season Winter markets

Winter farmers markets in Globe West

By Brock Parker