Front page

Timothy Murray under fire over campaign funding

Regulators have found evidence that the lieutenant governor may have violated state law by accepting donations from the disgraced former Chelsea housing director.

As Boston shudders, Maine townspeople shrug off cold

Temperatures in East Millinocket, Maine, dipped into the double digits below zero this week, with a wind chill that makes it feel closer to -30.

Contrasting scenes at a Shaw’s in Plymouth and at a nearby Stop & Shop.

Debee Tlumacki for The Boston Globe

Shaw’s struggles against lower-priced competition

Shaw’s, which was just bought by a group of private investors, has seen its sales erode $1.5 billion since 2006.

Senator John F. Kerry listened as he was introduced by Senator Elizabeth Warren (left), and Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee prior to the start of his confirmation hearing.

Kerry vows to combat climate change

In his confirmation hearing for secretary of state, John F. Kerry pledged to pursue a different brand of foreign policy while leading a global fight to combat climate change.

The family of free-information activist Aaron Swartz (right) and lawyers have blamed the office of US Attorney Carmen Ortiz for contributing to Swartz’s death and said his offenses did not warrant jail time. Ortiz said the case was “reasonably and appropriately handled.”

Swartz case prompts debate over cyber law

Aaron Swartz’s suicide touched off accusations that prosecutors abused their power by seeking a long sentence and stiff fine against him for hacking into the MIT network.

The Nation

Kerry vows to combat climate change

Senator John F. Kerry listened as he was introduced by Senator Elizabeth Warren (left), and Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee prior to the start of his confirmation hearing.

By Bryan Bender and David Uberti

In his confirmation hearing for secretary of state, John F. Kerry pledged to pursue a different brand of foreign policy while leading a global fight to combat climate change.

Assault weapons ban filed in Congress

“This is really an uphill road,” saidSenator Dianne Feinstein.

By Jennifer Steinhauer

Senator Dianne Feinstein announced legislation that would ban the sale and manufacture of 157 types of semiautomatic weapons.

Medicare paid $120m in illegal care

By Kelli Kennedy

The taxpayer-funded Medicare program paid more than $120 million for medical services for inmates and illegal immigrants.

The World

North Korea threatens nuclear test

By Chico Harlan

North Korea on Thursday threatened to carry out a nuclear test as part of an ‘‘all-out action’’ against the United States.

Westerners warned to leave Benghazi

By Alan Cowell and Rick Gladstone

Britain, Germany, the Netherlands and the US issued ominous warnings on Thursday about threats to Westerners in Libya.

Clashes in Egypt on eve of uprising anniversary

Protesters tried to tear down a concrete wall built to prevent them from reaching Parliament near Tahrir Square in Cairo.

By MAGGIE MICHAEL

Egyptian police clashed with protesters as they tried to tear down a wall built to prevent them from reaching the parliament building.

Editorial & Opinion

SCOT LEHIGH

The gun lobby’s long reach

NRA chief executive Wayne LaPierre heads the largest gun-rights organization in the United States.

By Scot Lehigh

If we’re to pass sensible gun laws in this country, proponents will have to match the gun lobby’s discipline and determination.

Joshua Green

GOP should embrace deficit reduction

By Joshua Green

In order to chart a path back from oblivion, Republicans need to offer something to voters beyond contempt for Obama. They should choose deficit reduction as that goal.

JOAN WICKERSHAM

The joy of re-reading

By Joan Wickersham

One of life’s great joys is re-reading. The stories don’t get old; the books change because we change.

Metro

Timothy Murray under fire over campaign funding

Lieutenant Governor Timothy Murray had asked state regulators to investigate whether the former Chelsea Housing Authority chief violated laws while campaigning for him.

By Andrea Estes and Sean P. Murphy

Regulators have found evidence that the lieutenant governor may have violated state law by accepting donations from the disgraced former Chelsea housing director.

Kevin Cullen

Here’s an out worth taking

By Kevin Cullen

The death of an IRA operative gives the US and British governments a face-saving way to walk away from an attempt to hijack an oral history project from the Boston College archives.

Swartz case prompts debate over cyber law

The family of free-information activist Aaron Swartz (right) and lawyers have blamed the office of US Attorney Carmen Ortiz for contributing to Swartz’s death and said his offenses did not warrant jail time. Ortiz said the case was “reasonably and appropriately handled.”

By Peter Schworm and Shelley Murphy

Aaron Swartz’s suicide touched off accusations that prosecutors abused their power by seeking a long sentence and stiff fine against him for hacking into the MIT network.

More Stories

String of fires hits 7 communities across Mass.

By Travis Andersen and Lauren Dezenski

Study gives new clues on tumors

By Carolyn Y. Johnson

HARWICH

Body is found on Cape walking path

By Lauren Dezenski

Lawrence

Connecticut fugitive held in slaying

By Haven Orecchio-Egresitz

Judge rejects US bid to seize Tewksbury motel

By Colin A. Youngand Martin Finucane and Martin Finucane

Business

Shaw’s struggles against lower-priced competition

Contrasting scenes at a Shaw’s in Plymouth and at a nearby Stop & Shop.

By Jenn Abelson

Shaw’s, which was just bought by a group of private investors, has seen its sales erode $1.5 billion since 2006.

Raytheon cuts forecast, fearing leaner times

By Michael B. Farrell

Waltham defense contractor Raytheon Co. projected that its adjusted earnings per share could fall as much as 9 percent in 2013 to $5.65.

Easing veterans’ job plight

Iraq War veteran Christopher Carter searched for jobs online at his Lenox home. He applied to Walmart’s hiring program.

By Sarah Shemkus

Walmart boosted a national trend with a new initiative aimed at hiring veterans, but the program’s critics say the company is not offering attractive job options.

Obituaries

Jacob Maxin; piano teacher played a few, magical concerts

Mr. Maxin taught at New England Conservatory 35 years.

By Bryan Marquard

Mr. Maxin, 83, taught at New England Conservatory, where he was renowned for his teaching abilities, for 35 years.

Antonio Frasconi; woodcut artist addressed war, racism

“The Arena,” a 1962 woodcut by Antonio Frasconi, was displayed at a Baltimore Museum of Art exhibition.

By Douglas Martin

Mr. Frasconi, 93, was called America’s foremost practitioner of the ancient art of the woodcut by Time magazine in 1953.

Linda Pugach, 75; blinded, she wed man behind attack

Linda and Burton Pugach in 1974, after his release from prison. He had proposed to her on live television.

By Ula Ilnytzky

Mrs. Pugach was blinded in 1959 when her lover hired hit men to throw lye in her face, and became a sensation after marrying him.

Sports

Knicks 89, celtics 86

Knicks hand Celtics 5th straight loss

J.R. Smith lets out a celebratory scream after Paul Pierce lost the ball out of bounds late in the fourth. Smith also nailed the game’s biggest basket.

By Julian Benbow

J.R. Smith hit a 3-pointer with 1:11 left to give the Knicks their first win in Boston in seven years.

Boston police officer part of boxing’s revival

Boston Police officer Billy Traft (right) is a headliner on Saturday’s TD Garden card.

By Nancy Marrapese-Burrell

Dorchester’s Billy Traft, who works in the department’s gang unit and will box at TD Garden on Saturday, is helping to prove boxing is far from dead.

Pedro Martinez thrilled to be back

Pedro Martinez walking onto the field to throw out the first pitch before the Boston Red Sox played the New York Yankees at Fenway Park on Easter Sunday April 4, 2010.

By Peter Abraham

The Red Sox icon said he feels he can help the team “be great again” in his new role as a special assistant to Ben Cherington.

G: Arts & Movies

Photography review

Three shows at Griffin Museum of Photography

Mary Beth Meehan, “Untitled” (young boxer).

By Mark Feeney

Despite their differences in subject, three shows highlighting life in Burkina Faso, the changing face of Brockton, and coping with multiple sclerosis all share a common spirit.

Art Review

Loïs Mailou Jones at the MFA

“Ubi Girl From Tai Region” (1972) by Loïs Mailou Jones.

By Cate McQuaid

A self-titled retrospective at the Museum of Fine Arts demonstrates that Jones had ample talents in realism, post-impressionism, textile design, and more.

Stage Review

Two worlds beckon in ‘Family Happiness’

Ksenia Kutepova (front), Kirill Pirogov, and Ilya Lyubimov in Theatre-Atelier

By Don Aucoin

Featuring a quite marvelous performance by Ksenia Kutepova as Masha, “Family Happiness’’ arrives Saturday in Boston for a two-day stint at the Cutler Majestic Theatre.

More Stories

Television Review

‘The Makeover’ is ‘Pygmalion’ on the Charles

By Matthew Gilbert

Scene & Heard

Ariel Rubin lets the music pull her in

By James Reed

Noisy Neighbors

Stereo Telescope, ‘On and Running’

By Luke O’Neil

Book Review

‘Safe House’ by Chris Ewan

By Andrew Caffrey

Events

Boston-area to do list

By June Wulff

Movie Stars

Movie Stars

Annie's Mailbox

Ask Amy column

Music Review

Dutoit is big and bold

By Jeffrey Gantz

More celebrity news

‘Black Swan’ teacher hired