Front page

Harvard to lead $100m study of NFL players

The NFL players union has selected Harvard to oversee a research initiative aimed at treating and preventing the health problems plaguing the athletes.

Obama, senators prepare immigration plans

Advocates say this is the best chance in decades to forge a path to US citizenship for 11 million illegal immigrants.

Governor Patrick’s interim senator pick near

With Senator Kerry set to resign, Patrick is expected to announce an interim senator tomorrow.

Mary Gundrum is grateful to the medical team at Boston Children’s Hospital that took care of her son Dominic Pio.

ARAM BOGHOSIAN FOR THE GLOBE

Family’s agonizing trail leads to infant’s surgery

A mother whose baby was born with part of his brain outside his head, along with myriad other issues, turned to Children’s Hospital for a rare procedure.

Some singles say they prefer group get-togethers because they are less pressured than one-on-one dates.

Dating sites remake the introductions

Several new matchmaking start-ups are tailored to millennials who have no interest in a string of traditional one-on-one dates to find companionship.

The Nation

$50.5b hurricane relief package reaches Obama

Debris from Hurricane Sandy in October lined a street in the Rockaways section of New York’s Queens borough.

By Andrew Miga

Congress gave final approval to a long-delayed $50.5 billion emergency relief measure for victims of Hurricane Sandy.

Amputee soldier given new arms in transplant

Army Sergeant Brendan Marrocco (at left) lost all four limbs in Iraq in 2009. He was the first soldier in Iraq or Afghanistan to survive such a devastating injury.

The first soldier to survive after losing all four limbs in the Iraq war has received a double-arm transplant.

President Obama recruits police to gun debate

Obama again pressured Congress to pass tough gun legislation, seeking help from law enforcement leaders in three communities that have dealt with mass shootings.

The World

Protests engulf Egypt despite Morsi’s decrees

Protesters in Suez had set afire cars and a police station Monday. Several said they would defy a curfew there.

By David D. Kirkpatrick

Unrest continued for a fifth day in Egypt, with protesters defying President Mohammed Morsi’s curfew and declaration of emergency.

Missing US tourist baffles

Police in Istanbul were scanning security camera footage Monday to try to trace a woman who disappeared while vacationing alone in the city.

4 dead as flooding hits Australia

Torrential rains have left thousands of homes flooded in eastern Australia, with more rain and high winds expected in Queensland and New South Wales.

Editorial & Opinion

FARAH STOCKMAN

Inauguration, Massachusetts style

By Farah Stockman

From gay marriage to health care, from John Kerry to Elizabeth Warren, it feels like the state is an ideological center of gravity in Washington again.

PAUL MCMORROW

Adjusting Boston’s High Spine

 The Prudential Center complex rises behind the Christian Science Plaza’s reflecting pool.

By Paul McMorrow

The Christian Science Plaza redevelopment is a watershed moment for Boston, but it’s also likely to prove bittersweet.

JOANNA WEISS

Bobby Jindal and the problem of the ‘stupid party’

By Joanna Weiss

The Louisiana governor says Republicans need to “stop being the stupid party,” but his support of teaching creationism seems to contradict that.

Metro

Obama, senators prepare immigration plans

Senators John McCain, Charles Schumer, and Marco Rubio discussed what they called a “tough, fair, and practical road map’’ on immigration Monday at the US Capitol.

By Maria Sacchetti

Advocates say this is the best chance in decades to forge a path to US citizenship for 11 million illegal immigrants.

Governor Patrick’s interim senator pick near

“I’m going to make an appointment of . . . a good steward of the interests of the people,” Governor Deval Patrick said.

By Frank Phillips and Michael Levenson

With Senator Kerry set to resign, Patrick is expected to announce an interim senator tomorrow.

Harvard to lead $100m study of NFL players

San Francisco 49ers quarterback Alex Smith (right) got a concussion when he was tackled by St. Louis Rams linebacker Jo-Lonn Dunbar in November.

By Kay Lazar

The NFL players union has selected Harvard to oversee a research initiative aimed at treating and preventing the health problems plaguing the athletes.

More Stories

Kevin Cullen

When judgment comes with wisdom

By Kevin Cullen

Woman dies in Haverhill house blaze

By Todd Feathers and Jeremy C. Fox

BOSTON

Man, 19, charged with the abuse of infant, mother

By Haven Orecchio-Egresitz

State of the City | 7 p.m.

Menino to announce online education initiative with Harvard, MIT

By Andrew Ryan

Ex-teacher accused of sexual conduct with student

By Travis Andersen and Jeremy C. Fox

Business

Genzyme advances MS drug business

Genzyme researchers in the biotech company’s Framingham laboratory.

By Robert Weisman

The drug maker has pushed deeper into multiple sclerosis treatments, a field that is led by its Cambridge neighbor Biogen Idec Inc.

Museum of Science gallery to overlook Charles

Boston’s Museum of Science aims to create a more vibrant entry that will take better advantage of the site’s waterfront porch.

By Casey Ross

The $21 million gallery will feature displays on its ecosystem and history.

Massachusetts foreclosures declined in 2012

Far fewer residents lost their homes to foreclosure last year, another sign that the economy and the housing market have stabilized.

Obituaries

Peter Ralph Lee, 67; public health advocate focused on community

Mr. Lee developed a passion for public health after learning about problems faced by many poor African-Americans.

By Stephanie M. Peters

Mr. Lee dedicated his life to addressing a host of health concerns, including AIDS, teen pregnancy, hunger, and intestinal parasites.

Leroy ‘Sugarfoot’ Bonner, frontman for Ohio Players

Mr. Bonner’s band played brassy dance music.

By Dan Sewell

Mr. Bonner’s band had a string of Top 40 hits in the mid-1970s and continued to perform for years after that. He was 69.

George Gruntz, jazz musician renowned for his versatility

Mr. Gruntz toured and recorded with many innovative musicians who performed with his Concert Jazz Band.

By Ben Ratliff

Mr. Gruntz wrote and arranged music specifically for the individual members of his band and gave them generous solo time. He was 80.

More Stories

Sports

Book excerpt

How trust evaporated between Red Sox, Terry Francona

Terry Francona oversaw a dramatic collapse in 2011, his final year with the Red Sox.

By Terry Francona and Dan Shaughnessy

In the final excerpt from his book, the ex-Sox manager discusses how he was hurt when news about his use of pain medication leaked after he left the team in 2011.

Bruins 5, Hurricanes 3

Bruins continue to roll in Carolina

David Krejci sees what the Hurricanes see — his winner in the net.

By Fluto Shinzawa

Two late goals erased a blown lead, and the Bruins have now captured nine out of 10 possible points through five games.

Celtics won’t overreact to loss of Rajon Rondo

Coach Doc Rivers reiterated to reporters that the Celtics weren’t going to concede the season after the loss of Rajon Rondo.

By Gary Washburn

Team president Danny Ainge said the organization will wait and assess its options, then determine whether another point guard is needed.

G: Living

G Cover

Why isn’t the 2nd haircut as good?

Marc Harris at one of his three Boston salons. “The challenge is maintaining that [level of attention] in the second visit,” he said. “But a busy stylist can see 40 to 60 clients a week.”

By Beth Teitell

The situation is painful to anyone who’s ever felt the high of finding a great stylist — only to crash back to reality.

Television Review

Plenty of characters, little story in ‘Southie Rules’

Above (from left): Devin, Matt, and Jonathan in A&E’s “Southie Rules.”

By Matthew Gilbert

The South Boston-based A&E reality show, which premieres Tuesday at 10 p.m., has a lot of characters but not much plot.

Finding poignancy amid the slapstick in ‘The Servant of Two Masters’

Steven Epp (pictured here with Liz Wizan in a 2010 production) stars in Yale Rep’s “The Servant of Two Masters” at the Paramount Center Mainstage.

By Patti Hartigan

There is poignancy amid the slapstick in the Yale Repertory Theatre production.

More Stories

Book REview

‘Good Kids’ by Benjamin Nugent

By Rayyan Al-Shawaf

Stage Review

Wheelock’s ‘Oliver!’ steals hearts

By Terry Byrne

Music Review

Sidestepping politics, with help from Beethoven

By Jeremy Eichler

Music Review

Wintry, and warmer, sounds from Dinosaur Annex

By Matthew Guerrieri

Album Review | Pop-Rock

Tegan and Sara, ‘Heartthrob’

By Marc Hirsh

Events

Boston-area to do list

By June Wulff

Annie's Mailbox

Ask Amy column

Album Review | INDIE ROCK

Local Natives, ‘Hummingbird’

Tuesday Night Television

Critic’s corner: What’s on TV tonight

By Matthew Gilbert

Names

A celebration for the Waltham House

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

DeCordova celebrates ‘Paint Things’ with a party

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

ART sets roster for Valentine’s Gala

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

Bobby Flay brings burgers to Burlington

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

Biz Markie in Brighton for 3 Scoops fund-raiser

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

Rolling out pictures of rockin’ parents

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

Give seven to meet Celtics’ Jared Sullinger

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

Sel de la Terre in Back Bay is closed

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

More Celebrity News

Whitney Houston’s mom opens up