Front page

Martha Coakley widens probe of for-profit schools

The Mass. attorney general has broadened her investigation into recruiting and lending practices at for-profit colleges and trade schools.

Gun-related crimes on the rise in Massachusetts

Crimes and injuries related to firearms have risen since the state passed a comprehensive package of gun laws in 1998.

Ex-House speaker Salvatore F. DiMasi (above) and lobbyist Richard McDonough were convicted of bribery in 2011.

DiMasi appeal to test ruling on bribery

The case of former House speaker Salvatore DiMasi and a lobbyist friend could help to redefine the standards for political bribery in federal courts.

Tim Kardatzke and Kristina Muskiewicz concentrated on their needlework at a Cambridge coed knitting group.

MATTHEW J. LEE/GLOBE STAFF

Men finding new hobbies to help relax, socialize

More men are taking up what might seem surprising group experiences: Not just cooking groups, but book clubs, and even, yes, knitting.

Former Massachusetts governor Mitt Romney’s portrait is the most recent addition to the “They Also Ran Gallery,” above a bank lobby in Norton, Kan.

Kansas gallery recalls presidential also-rans

Mitt Romney’s portrait is the most recent addition to the “They Also Ran Gallery,” above a bank lobby in Norton, Kansas.

The Nation

Kansas gallery recalls presidential also-rans

Former Massachusetts governor Mitt Romney’s portrait is the most recent addition to the “They Also Ran Gallery,” above a bank lobby in Norton, Kan.

By Matt Viser

Mitt Romney’s portrait is the most recent addition to the “They Also Ran Gallery,” above a bank lobby in Norton, Kansas.

‘American Sniper’ author shot to death in Texas

Chris Kyle, fatally shot along with another man on a gun range, had devoted his life to helping struggling soldiers.

By Michael Schwirtz

Former Navy SEAL Chris Kyle was shot to death on a shooting range by a former soldier he was trying to assist.

Church failed on abuse, archbishop says

Archbishop Jose Gomez, in a letter to Los Angeles parishioners Sunday, described newly released files on clergy sex abuse as ‘‘terribly sad and evil.’’

The World

Israeli strike in Syria damaged weapons lab

Ehud Barak, the defense minister of Israel

By David E. Sanger and Eric Schmitt

Israel’s attack on Syria may have also included the country’s main research center for work on biological and chemical weapons.

India toughens laws on sexual assault, trafficking after bus rape

The far-reaching package of measures was rushed through to satisfy public opinion in the wake of the horrific gang rape and murder of a young woman in New Delhi in December.

North Korea hints at nuclear test

North Korean leader Kim Jong Un attended a meeting of the Central Military Commission at an unknown location.

North Korean leader Kim Jong Un provided an indication that Pyongyang may be ready to conduct an atomic test at any time.

Editorial & Opinion

JOHN E. SUNUNU

Congress gets used to the idea of once unimaginable budget cuts

By John E. Sununu

With less than four weeks remaining before a March 1 deadline and an ideological budget divide deeper than ever, automatic across-the-board budget cuts — known in Washington as sequestration — may be an idea whose time has finally come. But don’t expect anyone to be happy about it. When members of Congress say the sequester is going to happen, they’re trying to get used to something that once seemed unimaginable but not seems inevitable.

JULIETTE KAYYEM

Hillary, Tina, and girls like them

By Juliette Kayyem

Within a 24-hour period, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and Tina Fey, the star, producer, writer, and creator of NBC’s “30 Rock,” grandly left their respective stages.

JAMES CARROLL

Immigration debate spotlights difficult history for Latinos

By James Carroll

The conventional wisdom is that Latinos are just the latest round of newcomers, as President Obama put it in Las Vegas, to “face hardship . . . racism . . . ridicule.” If reform now opens wider paths to legal status and citizenship, well, that’s akin to what “each new wave of immigrants” has gone through before, right? Not exactly. While, apart from native peoples, all Americans descend from onetime newcomers. But it is wrong to think Latinos are trodding a path well worn by groups that precede them.

Metro

Gun-related crimes on the rise in Massachusetts

By Brian MacQuarrie

Crimes and injuries related to firearms have risen since the state passed a comprehensive package of gun laws in 1998.

One still critical after bus accident in Boston

The Calvary Coach bus involved in Saturday’s crash on Soldiers Field Road was carried on Sunday to a lot in in Arlington.

By Travis Andersen, Derek J. Anderson and Jeremy C. Fox

At least one person who was injured when a charter bus slammed into an overpass Saturday night in Boston remained in critical condition.

Children’s Museum offers low-income discount

Amanda DiBattista of Peabody saved by using the EBT discounted admission program offered by the Boston Children’s Museum to bring her daughter, Amelia, 6, on a visit.

By Meghan E. Irons

The discount program allows families on government subsidies to show their EBT cards and pay $2 for admission.

Business ǀ Science

Martha Coakley widens probe of for-profit schools

Martha Coakley named only one of the schools she is investigating, American Career Institute, which abruptly shut down its eight locations in Massachusetts and Maryland last month.

By Todd Wallack

The Mass. attorney general has broadened her investigation into recruiting and lending practices at for-profit colleges and trade schools.

Data from apps help athletes raise the bar

The mobile app from Ubersense is used by elite athletes from 20 different sports — among them bobsledders.

By Aaron Lester

The Boston area is developing a large family of companies that have created apps and Web programs to help usher in a new age of self-­measurement.

Planes still carry batteries that grounded 787s

Pilots and safety advocates say if the Boeing 787’s battery system is too risky to allow the planes to fly, then it is too risky to ship those batteries as cargo on airliners.

By Joan Lowy

Pilots and safety advocates say if the Boeing 787’s battery system is too risky to allow the planes to fly, then it is too risky to ship those batteries as cargo on airliners.

Obituaries

Paul Phipps, 91; Hopkinton executive hosted marathoners

Paul Phipps helped found Hopkinton’s Chamber of Commerce.

By Marvin Pave

Mr. Phipps was a respected World War II veteran, insurance executive, and supporter of the Boston Marathon.

Christopher Van Hollen, 90; was envoy to Sri Lanka

Christopher Van Hollen, with Sirimavo Bandaranaike of Sri Lanka, the world’s first female prime minister.

By Adam Bernstein

Dr. Van Hollen was a career State Department officer who became an authority in Southeast Asian affairs.

Stefan Kudelski, 83; recorders revolutionized films, spying

By Paul Vitello

Mr. Kudelski was the inventor of the first professional-quality portable tape recorder.

Sports

Ravens 34, 49ers 31

Ravens hold off 49ers to win Super Bowl

Ravens linebacker Ray Lewis, who announced his retirement before the playoffs, went out a winner, capping a 17-year career with his second Super Bowl title.

By Shalise Manza Young

The Ravens fended off a second-half comeback by the 49ers, and a momentum-killing stadium power outage, to win the championship.

Dan Shaughnessy

This Super Bowl was one of the greatest

Ravens quarterback Joe Flacco won his first Super Bowl on Sunday against the 49ers.

By Dan Shaughnessy

Ray Lewis, Joe Flacco and the Ravens beat the 49ers in a game that had everything — including a 34-minute power outage.

On football

Jim Harbaugh wrong to blame officials

49ers head coach Jim Harbaugh protested a non-call by the officials after a fourth down play against the Ravens.

By Greg A. Bedard

The 49ers coach found plenty of fault with the officials in the loss to the Ravens, but he should have looked at his curious play-calling down the stretch.

G: Health

Health

Finding the best therapist can be confusing

By Patricia Wen

Among the available mental health professionals comes a confusing blizzard of options — and terminology.

Q&A

Mother’s death prompts doctor to critique her care

“I think this was really the wake-up call for me,’’ Dr. Jonathan R. Welch says of the circumstances that led to his mother’s death.

By Karen Weintraub

In 2010, Dr. Jonathan Welch’s mother died after a medical error that he felt powerless to do anything about.

Daily Dose

Why mastectomies are on the rise

By Deborah Kotz

Surgeons have seen a surge in requests from breast cancer patients who opt to have both breasts removed, rather than removing just the malignant lump in one.

More Stories

Daily Dose

Can eating earlier help you lose weight?

By Deborah Kotz

Health Answers

Improving erectile dysfunction without pills

By Courtney Humphries

Television Review

‘Monday Mornings’: Doctors, you know the types

By Matthew Gilbert

Music Review

Chamber orchestra goes on a charm offensive

By David Weininger

Music Review

At the Orpheum, Fun. and lots of it

By Marc Hirsh

Events

Boston-area to do list

By June Wulff

Monday Night Television

Critic’s corner: What’s on TV tonight

By Matthew Gilbert

Annie's Mailbox

Ask Amy column

Chess Notes

Weekly chess column

By Harold Dondis and Chris Chase

Names

Johnny Depp to play Whitey Bulger?

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

A Directors Guild win for Ben Affleck

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

‘Jersey Boys’ in town, ‘Sister Act’ says farewell

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

Boston fans hit Super Bowl weekend

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

Zoe Saldana to shoot film in New England

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

Celebrities spotted in and around town

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein