Front page

Insurers set off a fight on replacement parts

Some repair shop owners and consumer advocates argue that alternative parts don’t always fit correctly or match the performance of new licensed parts.

Dina Rudick/Globe Staff

Repair shops in Mass. are considering lobbying state regulators to prevent insurers from insisting on using only used or generic parts to fix cars.

Jay Corbet of Coca-Cola can stock soft drinks but not water on campus.

At University of Vermont, no admission for bottled water

UVM is the first public university in New England to ban bottled water, which activists say is environmentally unfriendly from the factory to the landfill.

Senator Elizabeth Warren conferred with Democratic colleague Joe Manchin of West Virginia during testimony at the Senate Banking Committee on Thursday.

Warren rips deals with big banks

After a quiet first month, Senator Elizabeth Warren rebuked federal regulators for settling cases with banks.

Wellesley police spent months investigating a fatal truck-bike crash. A grand jury declined to indict the truck driver.

BILL BRETT FOR THE BOSTON GLOBE

Cyclists say their rights are going unrecognized

In Boston’s growing cycling community, a perceived lack of criminal prosecution of motorists involved in fatal bike crashes has been a source of outrage.

Bonds, once a safe haven, may be next big risk

The 30-year bull market in bonds, with prices rising as interest rates plunged, is ending, market strategists said.

The Nation

Warren rips deals with big banks

Senator Elizabeth Warren conferred with Democratic colleague Joe Manchin of West Virginia during testimony at the Senate Banking Committee on Thursday.

By David Uberti

After a quiet first month, Senator Elizabeth Warren rebuked federal regulators for settling cases with banks.

Republicans block Hagel from defense post

Senators John McCain (left) and Lindsey Graham voted against the nomination despite voicing objections to the use of the filibuster against defense secretary nominees.

By Jeremy W. Peters

The move is likely to further strain partisan tensions while temporarily preventing the White House from assembling its national security team.

Transocean Gulf spill plea deal OK’d

By MICHAEL KUNZELMAN and KEVIN McGILL

A federal judge has approved Transocean Ltd.’s agreement with the Justice Department to plead guilty to a misdemeanor charge and pay $400 million in criminal penalties for its role in the 2010 Gulf of Mexico oil spill.

The World

Amid tensions, S. Korea stages military drills

South Korean troops set up barbed wire fencing during a military exercise near the demilitarized zone in Paju, South Korea, on Thursday.

By Choe Sang-Hun

Following North Korea’s nuclear weapons test, South Korea staged military drills and disclosed a new cruise missile.

Iran shows inspectors main nuclear site

By GEORGE JAHN

Tehran showed UN officials equipment meant to accelerate output of material that can be used for both reactor fuel and atomic arms.

Tunisian leader fights party, may resign

By Bouazza Ben Bouazza

Tunisia’s prime minister will continue to oppose his own political party and seek to form a government of technocrats by Saturday to solve the country’s crisis or resign.

Editorial & Opinion

SCOT LEHIGH

GOP progress — now you see it, now you don’t

By Scot Lehigh

After four long years as Chicken Little, can the GOP conclude that the sky actually hasn’t fallen and remake itself?

Richard W. Murray and Daniel P. Schrag

The coming storm

Homes on Turner Road in Scituate were circled by water from the ocean during last week’s blizzard.

By Richard W. Murray and Daniel P. Schrag

The best chance of success in minimizing the effects of climate change will involve industry, government, and citizens making challenging decisions.

Elissa Ely

The luxury of clean clothes

By Elissa Ely

MassHealth covered the cost of the cream to rid a patient of scabies, but not the cost of a load of laundry.

Metro

Kevin Cullen

Whitey-washed disinformation

By Kevin Cullen

Whitey Bulger needs to summon all his considerable powers of persuasion to convince anybody except the dangerously naïve that he wasn’t an informant.

Cyclists say their rights are going unrecognized

Wellesley police spent months investigating a fatal truck-bike crash. A grand jury declined to indict the truck driver.

By Martine Powers

In Boston’s growing cycling community, a perceived lack of criminal prosecution of motorists involved in fatal bike crashes has been a source of outrage.

At University of Vermont, no admission for bottled water

Jay Corbet of Coca-Cola can stock soft drinks but not water on campus.

By Brian MacQuarrie

UVM is the first public university in New England to ban bottled water, which activists say is environmentally unfriendly from the factory to the landfill.

More Stories

Former US attorney Sullivan eyes Senate bid

By Frank Phillips and Noah Bierman

MARSHFIELD

Storm damage leads to 3-alarm electrical fire

By Lauren Dezenski

Business

Insurers set off a fight on replacement parts

Some repair shop owners and consumer advocates argue that alternative parts don’t always fit correctly or match the performance of new licensed parts.

By Todd Wallack

Repair shops in Mass. are considering lobbying state regulators to prevent insurers from insisting on using only used or generic parts to fix cars.

Bonds, once a safe haven, may be next big risk

By Beth Healy

The 30-year bull market in bonds, with prices rising as interest rates plunged, is ending, market strategists said.

Few local changes likely as airlines merge

The American Airlines-US Airways union is the fourth major airline merger in five years.

By Katie Johnston

The $11 billion merger agreement between American Airlines and US Airways is not expected to have a major impact at Logan.

More Stories

Buffett joins $23b deal for Heinz

By Candice Choi and Josh Funk

Dangerous drug found in European horse meat

By Dan Bilefsky and Stephen Castle

Eurozone hurt as Germany falters

By Pan Pylas and David Rising

Personal Finance

Realtors, bankers warn against a strict down-payment rule

By Clea Benson and Cheyenne Hopkins

Obituaries

Joe Morgan, 67; newsman finished career in traffic copter

Joe Morgan began delivering traffic reports in 1997. “I flew every morning, every afternoon, had the time of my life.”

By Bryan Marquard

Mr. Morgan spent the end of his career high above Greater Boston reporting on traffic for WBZ Radio from a helicopter.

Jake McNiece, rabble-rousing, bridge-razing paratrooper

Jake McNiece (right) applied war paint to another paratrooper from the Filthy 13 during World War II.

By William Yardley

Mr. McNiece, 93, was a paratrooper from the Filthy 13 during World War II.

Ronald Dworkin, 81; legal philosopher and scholar was expert on UK law

By Gregory Katz

Mr. Dworkin was a liberal scholar who argued that the law should be founded on moral integrity.

Sports

Celtics still seen as dangerous team

Paul Pierce, Kevin Garnett and the Celtics went into the All-Star break four games over .500.

By Baxter Holmes

NBA insiders say the depleted Celtics could make a second-half surge because of their veteran guile and leadership from Doc Rivers.

Dan Shaughnessy

Why we love Larry Lucchino

“Maybe to everybody we have something to prove,” said Sox president Larry Lucchino.

By Dan Shaughnessy

The man who runs the Red Sox may not be happy with Dan Shaughnessy, but the Globe columnist offers abundant praise for him.

Christopher L. Gasper

NBA’s age limit doesn’t need repeal

Nerlens Noel’s knee injury should not hurt his prospective career in the NBA, but staying in school may make it better.

By Christopher L. Gasper

The knee injury of Nerlens Noel, the likely No. 1 pick, is unfortunate, but the bigger tragedy would be repealing the NBA’s age limit because of it.

G: Arts & Movies

Shakespeare’s marriage is at center of ‘The Last Will’

Above: The cast of “The Last Will” (from left): Stacy Fischer, Brooke Adams, Allyn Burrows, Billy Meleady, and Merritt Janson. Opposite page (from left): Robert Brustein with Adams and Burrows.

By Jeffrey Gantz

Shakespeare’s final puzzling years are addressed in Robert Brustein’s “The Last Will,” now having its world premiere at the Modern Theatre.

Television review

‘Beyoncé’: In search of charisma

By Matthew Gilbert

The HBO documentary is a vanity production from top to bottom with very little that feels genuinely candid.

Names

New tune arrives just in time for Timberfakes

The Timberfakes — Boston’s own Justin Timberlake cover band — were elated when the pop star announced that he’d be making new music.

More Stories

Television Review

Eagles fly high in new Showtime documentary

By Sarah Rodman

Classical Notes

Jazz trio Bad Plus takes on Stravinsky at the ICA

By David Weininger

Art Review

Ed Ruscha’s icons speak of the everyday

By Cate McQuaid

Scene & Heard

Monktec sheds new light on a classic sound

By Luke O’Neil

Noisy Neighbors

Doctor Jeep, ‘Sphinx’

By Luke O’Neil

High Five

Kacey Musgraves’s merry go ’round

By Sarah Rodman

Night Watch

Eric Prydz at Prime

By Katy Rushlau

Book Review

‘Schroder’ by Amity Gaige

By Michael Patrick Brady

events

Boston-area to do list

By June Wulff

Annie's Mailbox

Ask Amy column