Front page

Sequester’s long-term effects still unclear

Therein lies the paradox of the sequester: For some, the sky is falling. But for many others, the budget cuts will hardly register.

David “Duffy” Dodge, 86, (left), Paul Rich, 84, and George MacNeil, 82, suited up for the Hochgebirge Challenge Cup at Cannon Mountain on Saturday.

Jackie Ricciardi for The Boston Globe

Racing past the stereotypes about age

These five octogenarians have skied against one another for years, challenging assumptions about competitive sports and aging.

“I was crying, crying, crying,” said Daphne Alce of her time spent in a Boston jail following her arrest.

Bill Greene/Globe Staff

Release of immigrants brings debate on freeing many more

Daphne Alce fled political upheaval and an abusive husband in Haiti. Then she ran from a boyfriend who beat her in Canada and tried to make her way to Philadelphia, where she had sent her children to live with a sister. When Alce tried to cross the US border with a fraudulent passport in October, she was caught and arrested.

Chief justice blasted over Mass. voting ‘cheap shot’

Chief Justice John Roberts said the state has “the worst ratio of white voter turnout to African-American voter turnout,” a claim Secretary of State William F. Galvin called woefully wrong.

Andrew Dreyfus, president and chief executive officer for Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts at the annual Boston College's Chief Executives' Club of Boston annual luncheon at the Boston Harbor Hotel's Wharf Room in June 2012.

Blue Cross to pay board again, though at reduced level

Two years after bowing to outside pressure and suspending its five-figure annual pay for directors, the health insurer is reinstating the payments.

The Nation

Sequester’s long-term effects still unclear

Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid Nevada (at the podium) held a news conference on the eve of the sequester with fellow Democrats Charles Schumer of New York (center) and Senate Majority Whip Richard Durbin of Illinois.

By David Uberti

Therein lies the paradox of the sequester: For some, the sky is falling. But for many others, the budget cuts will hardly register.

White House urges justices to end ban on gay marriage

By Robert Barnes

The Obama administration’s argument against California’s ban could also cast doubt on prohibitions in other states.

Soldier pleads guilty in Wikileaks case

Army Pfc. Bradley Manning faces up to 20 years in prison for his paticipation in the Wikileaks case.

By Charlie Savage

The 25-year-old faces a maximum of 20 years in prison. He said in court he leaked the information “to make the world a better place.”

The World

Jailed Palestinians end hunger strike

By Ian Deitch

Two Palestinian prisoners held by Israel have ended their hunger strike of nearly three months and two other hunger strikers have been hospitalized.

30 Afghan police killed in two days

By Azam Ahmed

Afghan officials said at least 10 policemen had died in two attacks Thursday, bringing the number of killed officers to at least 30 in just the past two days.

Chavez fights for his life, official says

Venezuela’s vice president said President Hugo Chavez continues to undergo treatment more than two months after his latest cancer surgery.

Editorial & Opinion

CARLO ROTELLA

The shuffle done right

Magic Slim was a contemporary of blues greats Muddy Waters and Howlin' Wolf who helped shape the sound of the Chicago blues.

By Carlo Rotella

Magic Slim raised a journeyman’s fidelity to his trade to an order of accomplishment so advanced that it became a kind of virtuosity.

Mary Battenfeld

Neighborhood over quality in school plan?

By Mary Battenfeld

Cities, and city schools, become stronger when we stride across boundaries.

SCOT LEHIGH

Baby boomers are the economy’s ‘oh, no!’

By Scot Lehigh

A substantial amount of the longer-term reduction will have to be done, one way or another, on the spending side as health care costs are projected to increase.

Metro

Gabriel E. Gomez makes debut on trail for Senate seat

Republican Gabriel Gomez, shown at Brody’s Diner in Shrewsbury, made his debut on the campaign trail on Thursday.

By Stephanie Ebbert

Gomez introduced himself to voters as a “new kind of ­Republican” and made his first public appearances in Quincy, Shrewsbury, and Springfield.

Kevin Cullen

‘Silver Linings Playbook’ a good take on a tough subject

By Kevin Cullen

That a film based on struggles of people with mental illness would ­receive such acclaim is what makes a Massachusetts author’s achievement a turning point.

Release of immigrants brings debate on freeing many more

“I was crying, crying, crying,” said Daphne Alce of her time spent in a Boston jail following her arrest.

By Maria Sacchetti

Despite the release of hundreds of immigrants this week, groups say thousands who have no criminal record remain jailed.

More Stories

Wastewater treatment plant in Hull floods

By Travis Andersen and Lauren Dezenski

STONEHAM

Missing Maine child found with woman in Stoneham

By Haven Orecchio-Egresitz

BOSTON

Man is shot in Egleston Square in Roxbury, police say

By Haven Orecchio-Egresitz

Business

Blue Cross to pay board again, though at reduced level

Andrew Dreyfus, president and chief executive officer for Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts at the annual Boston College's Chief Executives' Club of Boston annual luncheon at the Boston Harbor Hotel's Wharf Room in June 2012.

By Robert Weisman

Two years after bowing to outside pressure and suspending its five-figure annual pay for directors, the health insurer is reinstating the payments.

Overstock threatens to cut ties with affiliates

By Jenn Abelson

The e-commerce giant is threatening to cut ties with marketing affiliates in the state because of proposed legislation that would force the company to collect sales tax.

Local burger chain b.good ready to grow

The b.good all-natural burger and food chain will see its first franchise location open in Shrewsbury later this month.

By Taryn Luna

The founders of b.good, a Boston chain of nine farm-to-table burger and fry joints, are launching an ambitious campaign to spread their feel-good fast food.

Obituaries

Randolph Bromery, 87, pioneer in higher education

Dr. Bromery rose to become chancellor at UMass.

By Bryan Marquard

Dr. Bromery served as chancellor of the University of Massachusetts Amherst, led the state Board of Regents of Higher Education, and blazed a trail for African-Americans in academia.

Denis Forman; spearheaded ‘Brideshead Revisited’; 95

Denis Forman (left) and producer Christopher Morahan in India for “The Jewel in the Crown,” a miniseries from 1984.

By Paul Vitello

Mr. Forman was a television executive who served as steward to some of the most ambitious and popular British programs ever made.

Tom Griffin, 96; navigated daring Doolittle Raid on Japan in WWII

Major Tom Griffin in his Ohio home with a Time cover with James Doolittle on its cover.

By Dan Sewell

Mr. Griffin was a B-25 navigator in the audacious Doolittle’s Raid on mainland Japan during World War II.

Sports

Bruins 2, Senators 1 (OT)

Bruins’ win streak continues back at home

The Bruins celebrated the game-winning goal in overtime.

By Fluto Shinzawa

Patrice Bergeron tipped a shot just past Ottawa’s Robin Lehner in overtime, giving the Bruins their 5th straight win.

Christopher L. Gasper

Hard to believe in these Celtics

At some point, the Celtics will have to face the facts that the Paul Pierce and Kevin Garnett era will run out of time.

By Christopher L. Gasper

After losing Rajon Rondo, the Celtics have been a delight to watch. But it’s a mirage, because this team’s long-term future is still murky.

For Smith College, an unlikely trip to NCAA Tournament

The Smith College women's basketball team is headed to the NCAA Tournament.

By Amalie Benjamin

With a reputation based far more on its academics than its athletics, the birthplace of women’s basketball finally has a team to cheer.

G: Arts & Movies

Boston Ballet embraces a choreographer in ‘All Kylián’

Boston Ballet’s Kathleen Breen Combes rehearsing “Tar and Feathers,” a dance by choreographer Jirí Kylián.

By Karen Campbell

With the three ballets by Jiří Kylián to be showcased in its upcoming program, Boston Ballet now has nine of the Czech choreographer’s works in its repertoire.

Ballet Flamenco de Andalucía brings ‘Metáfora’ to Boston

The dancers of Ballet Flamenco de Andalucía are making their Boston debut.

By Janine Parker

Flamenco dancer and choreographer Rubén Olmo’s two-part work pays homage to a dance tradition steeped in the imagery of blood, sweat, and fire.

At 22, Matthew Aucoin is a composer with composure

Matthew Aucoin has been recently commissioned to write an opera for The National Civil War Project.

By James Sullivan

The American Repertory Theater announced that Aucoin has been commissioned to write an opera as part of the National Civil War Project.

More Stories

Television review

‘The Bible’ translates into a bad series

By Sarah Rodman

Television review

‘Vikings’: History casts a spell

By Matthew Gilbert

Classical Notes

Evan Ziporyn continues his musical experimentation

By David Weininger

Noisy Neighbors

Ashley Paul, ‘Line the Clouds’

By Matt Parish

Book Review

‘98% Funky Stuff’ by Maceo Parker

By Siddhartha Mitter

Night Watch

I Heart Fridays at Club Café

By Katy Rushlau

Movie Review

‘Table’ focuses too much on presentation

By Mark Feeney

events

Boston-area to do list

By June Wulff

Annie's Mailbox

Ask Amy column