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Tips pour in on Gardner Museum art theft

The FBI and the Gardner Museum received a flood of tips, as new details emerged about the turning point in the investigation of the heist 23 years ago.

Inocencia Perez (right) and Gerardo Romero said landlord City Realty has raised their monthly rent by $300. They are fighting an eviction from their Chelsea apartment.

Tenants, buyers of foreclosed units tangle over rents

A growing group of Boston-area tenants are fighting rent increases from real estate investors who are looking to make a profit.

Air files on Internet activist’s case, father asks

The father of Aaron Swartz said MIT should make public all internal documents related to the federal case against his son.

Deadly blasts rocked Baghdad Tuesday on the eve of the 10th anniversary of the US-led invasion that toppled the Saddam Hussein regime.

HADI MIZBAN/ASSOCIATED PRESS

10 years after US-led invasion, peace evades Iraq

Iraq closed a painful decade just as it began: with explosions reverberating around the capital.

Derek Thach, 9, of Dorchester’s Pack 11, at the Mather School.

Boy Scouts a surprise success in Boston

After a campaign by the local division of the Boy Scouts, there are more than 700 boys in roughly 25 Cub Scout packs in Dorchester, Mattapan, and Roxbury.

Mashpee tribe, Mass. agree on new terms for casino

The Mashpee Wampanoag would pay the state 17 percent of gambling revenue from a Taunton tribal casino under a new deal with Governor Patrick.

The Nation

7 Marines die in explosion at Nevada base

A flag flew at half staff in Hawthorne.

By Scott Sonner and Ted Bridis

A mortar shell explosion killed seven Marines and injured a half-dozen more during mountain warfare training in Nevada’s high desert.

Defiant teen gets 3 life sentences in Ohio shooting

After entering an Ohio courthouse Tuesday, T. J. Lane, 18, displayed his T-shirt emblazoned with the word “killer.”

By Thomas J. Sheeran

T.J. Lane, 18, cursed and gestured obscenely as he was given three life sentences for shooting to death three students in an Ohio high school.

Court backs student in textbook copyright case

By Mark Sherman

The Supreme Court ruled Tuesday that textbooks and other goods made and sold abroad can be resold online and in discount stores without violating US copyright law.

The World

10 years after US-led invasion, peace evades Iraq

Deadly blasts rocked Baghdad Tuesday on the eve of the 10th anniversary of the US-led invasion that toppled the Saddam Hussein regime.

By Tim Arango

Iraq closed a painful decade just as it began: with explosions reverberating around the capital.

Philippine birth-control law is on hold

By Floyd Whaley

The Philippine Supreme Court on Tuesday temporarily halted a landmark law that would provide free contraception to poor women.

Top aide of Libya’s Khadafy arrested in Egypt

By Amir Makar

Ahmed Qaddaf al-Dam surrendered to Egyptian security forces after shots were fired following a seige at his Cairo home, an official and witnesses said.

Editorial & Opinion

JEFF JACOBY

On balance, the Iraq war was worth it

The scene at Iraq’s crossed swords monument has changed since US soldiers were photographed at the site in 2008. Iraqi officials had started tearing down the archway in 2007 but quickly halted those plans and began restoring the monument tw o years ago.

By Jeff Jacoby

The invasion 10 years ago ended the reign of a genocidal tyrant, struck a shaft of fear into other dictators, and led to democratic self-government in Iraq.

JOANNA WEISS

The green movement’s green tactic

By Joanna Weiss

A deep-pocketed environmentalist is threatening to use his money to forward his beliefs. Could this signal a new tack for the environmental movement?

editorial

EU, IMF should reverse course on Cyprus bailout

The rescue package, which includes a tax on the bank deposits of ordinary Cypriots, risks destabilizing banks across Europe and should be revised.

Metro

Tips pour in on Gardner Museum art theft

Richard DesLauriers, the FBI special agent in charge of the Boston office, said his agency is seeking the public’s help in recovering the stolen Gardner works, valued at $500 million.

By Milton J. Valencia, Shelley Murphy and Stephen Kurkjian

The FBI and the Gardner Museum received a flood of tips, as new details emerged about the turning point in the investigation of the heist 23 years ago.

Mashpee tribe, Mass. agree on new terms for casino

Governor Patrick’s administration is confident the new compact will pass the federal review.

By Mark Arsenault

The Mashpee Wampanoag would pay the state 17 percent of gambling revenue from a Taunton tribal casino under a new deal with Governor Patrick.

Boy Scouts a surprise success in Boston

Derek Thach, 9, of Dorchester’s Pack 11, at the Mather School.

By Meghan E. Irons

After a campaign by the local division of the Boy Scouts, there are more than 700 boys in roughly 25 Cub Scout packs in Dorchester, Mattapan, and Roxbury.

More Stories

Adrian Walker

Gerard Leone steps away from government

By Adrian Walker

Another snow victim? School calendars

By Lauren Dezenski and John R. Ellement

Business

Tenants, buyers of foreclosed units tangle over rents

Inocencia Perez (right) and Gerardo Romero said landlord City Realty has raised their monthly rent by $300. They are fighting an eviction from their Chelsea apartment.

By Jenifer B. McKim

A growing group of Boston-area tenants are fighting rent increases from real estate investors who are looking to make a profit.

Nurses OK strike at Quincy hospital

By Robert Weisman and Jessica Bartlett

The nurses’ union said its members authorized a one-day strike at Quincy Medical Center after the Steward-owned hospital closed a 40-bed medical surgical floor.

Mullen lands $200m Acura advertising account

By Taryn Luna

The Boston advertising firm solidified its position as an industry leader when it landed the account of the luxury auto brand, analysts said.

Obituaries

Booth Gardner, 76; ex-governor backed assisted suicide law

By William Yardley

Mr. Gardner, a two-term governor of Washington, died Friday at his home in Tacoma.

Henry Bromell, 66; produced hit TV series

Henry Bromell won an Emmy for “Homeland.”

Mr. Bromell, an executive producer for the television series ‘‘Homeland,’’ has died, according to his agent.

Sports

Jets 3, Bruins 1

Bruins give in to Jets, blow another late lead

Winnipeg’s Zach Bogosian sent Bruins’ forward Milan Lucic flying after this first-period collision.

By Fluto Shinzawa

The Bruins gave up a third-period lead for the fourth time this month in a loss to the Jets in Winnipeg.

Christopher L. Gasper

Why isn’t WBC a hit in the US?

The Dominican Republic’s Carlos Santana (left) and Fernando Rodney celebrated after beating Puerto Rico in the championship game of the World Baseball Classic.

By Christopher L. Gasper

The World Baseball Classic ended Tuesday, but many fans barely noticed because in the US it has just been background noise.

Tommy Amaker, Steve Alford meet again in tournament

Harvard coach Tommy Amaker and NewMexico coach Steve Alford have competed once as players and nine times as head coaches in the Big Ten.

By Michael Vega

The last time Harvard coach Tommy Amaker and New Mexico coach Steve Alford faced each in the NCAA Tournament was as players in 1987.

G: Food

Munch Madness 2013

It’s time once again to pick Boston’s restaurant champ

By Glenn Yoder

This year, the three restaurants that were in the final round of previous editions of Munch Madness are all on the same side of the bracket, ensuring some fresh blood in the championship.

dining out

Puritan & Company: inventive takes on traditional dishes

Above: Swordfish and pastrami at Puritan & Company. Right: Cauliflower soup served with a crouton and savory granola.

By Katie Johnston

Dinner guests normally don’t expect to be served mustard gelato or swordfish pastrami in a New England farmhouse, but that’s what you get at Puritan & Company in Cambridge.

Let the Seder plate determine the menu

Luke Pyenson prepared the braised brisket with red wine, spices, prunes, carrots, onions, and leeks.

By Luke Pyenson

Jewish specialties can be heavy, and for the upcoming holiday, which begins on March 25, there are many restrictions about grains and other foods.

More Stories

Cheap Eats

Bobby Flay puts a palace in Burlington

By Glenn Yoder

Sunday supper

Vegetarians mix Mideast with Europe at Passover

By Karoline Boehm Goodnick

GALLERIES

What’s up at Boston-area art galleries

By Cate McQuaid

Book Review

‘Salt Sugar Fat’ by Michael Moss

By Laura Collins-Hughes

A tank away

It’s all downhill and chill in Warren, Vt.

By Diane Bair and Pamela Wright

events

Boston-area to do list

By Milva DiDomizio

Annie's Mailbox

Ask Amy column

Music Review

Disclosure brings dance fever to the Sinclair

By Michael Andor Brodeur

Names

Tom and Gisele have fun in Costa Rica

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

Bradley Cooper, British model go for stroll

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

‘Drinking Buddies’ picked up for distribution

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

Needham’s Aly Raisman is pretty in pink

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

Mass. Production Coalition hosts film industry expo

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

Mary Badham is a scholar at Suffolk University

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

Institute of Contemporary Art gala takes shape

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

Annie Lennox to give Berklee commencement address

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

Locals out to support Justin Timberlake in LA

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein