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Front page

Boston judge got $550,000 in free legal help

Judge Raymond Dougan received more than $550,000 in free legal services from a top Boston law firm to defend him against bias charges.

City transportation officials hope to introduce cycle tracks, bike lanes separated from the street by a barrier, on a few sections of busy roads.

With crash data, Boston tries to make bicycling safer

A report with a slew of statistics on crash locations and times, helmet use, and bicyclist and motorist behavior compiles years of ­data on bike collisions in the city.

An independent report said the IRS developed “inappropriate criteria” that gave more scrutiny to conservative groups.

Obama tries to control damage on three fronts

The White House is seeking to insulate itself from the fallout over Benghazi, IRS scrutiny of conservative groups, and the monitoring of phone records at the AP.

Angelina Jolie shown with her mother, Marcheline Bertrand, who died of cancer.

Fred Prouser/Reuters/file 2001

Angelina Jolie’s preventive surgery shows harsh choices

The actress made the decision to have a double mastectomy after a blood test detected a genetic defect that made breast cancer all but certain in her lifetime.

Just when Boston fans needed a big lift, the struggling Bruins rose and provided a stunning win over the Leafs.

Dan Shaughnessy

Thank you, Bruins, we needed that win

We needed something fun to take our minds off the tragic events of last month, and the Bruins’ miracle comeback against Toronto provided that.

The Nation

Report blames IRS managers for lax oversight

Attorney General Eric Holder said that he had ordered an investigation into whether IRS officials broke any laws.

By Jonathan Weisman

An inspector general’s report blamed management for failing to stop the scrutiny of conservative groups.

Minnesota men sentenced in Somali terror case

By Amy Forliti

Two men who left Minnesota to join the terrorist group Al Shabab in Somalia were sentenced to three years in federal prison.

Demolition begins on iconic NJ coaster wrecked by Sandy

The claw of a crane tore through the structure of the Jet Star Roller Coaster Tuesday off the New Jersey coast. When Superstorm Sandy hit, the roller coaster plunged into the waves from an amusement pier where it had stood for decades.

By Wayne Parry

When Superstorm Sandy hit last October, the Jet Star roller coaster plunged into the waves off the pier. On Tuesday, crews began tearing down the remains.

The World

Russia bans alleged CIA operative in espionage flap

Russia identified the American as Ryan C. Fogle, who had an official post at the US Embassy.

By David M. Herszenhorn and Ellen Barry

Russia expelled an American it said was a CIA operative who tried to recruit a Russian security officer as a spy.

Italian ship captain is denied plea deal

By Paolo Santalucia and Frances D’Emilio

Italian prosecutors rejected a plea-bargain bid by the captain of the Costa Concordia cruise ship that ran aground off Italy last year, killing 32 people, defense lawyers said.

India will offer low-cost vaccine

By Ravi Nessman

The vaccine has proved effective against a diarrhea-causing virus that is one of the leading causes of childhood deaths across the developing world.

Editorial & Opinion

derrick z. jackson

It’s Nixon Week at the White House

President Barack Obama spoke Monday during a joint news conference with British Prime Minister David Cameron.

By Derrick Z. Jackson

In fretting about the Tea Party and leaks to the press, the Obama administration is showing an unprecedented display of paranoia and abridgement of freedom.

SCOT LEHIGH

The good and the bad of Gabriel Gomez

Gabriel Gomez greeted voters at the Broadway MBTA station in South Boston on May 1, the day after he won the GOP primary in the race for the US Senate.

By Scot Lehigh

Gomez seems to be an affable person, but given that his campaign is built on his supposed business knowledge, shouldn’t he have something more substantive to offer?

JEFF JACOBY

Terrorism is never justified

By Jeff Jacoby

It is not part of constructive self-criticism to make excuses for those who commit acts of terrorism, or to explain why their victims, as citizens of the United States, had it coming.

Metro

Deputies criticize Boston fire chief in letter

Chief Steve Abraira replied that he had acted appropriately.

By Travis Andersen

Thirteen deputy Boston fire chiefs said Chief Steve Abraira failed to show leadership at the scene of the Marathon bombings.

Worcester bishop pleads guilty to refusing breathalyzer test

McManus told police he had a glass of wine and a drink with dinner, a report says.

By Peter Schworm

Bishop Robert McManus must lose his driver’s license for six months, pay fines and court costs, do community service, and undergo alcohol education.

Act dropped from Markey event over Confederate flag

Ben Jones (left) was supposed to perform at a fund-raiser for former colleague Edward Markey.

By Jim O’Sullivan

Rep. Edward Markey disinvited a Confederate flag defender and former TV star from playing music at a Washington, D.C., fund-raiser.

More Stories

Adrian Walker

Krystal Edwards found hope and a future

By Adrian Walker

PORTLAND, Maine

Canadian lobster protests revive memories of 2012

By Clarke Canfield

Business

$25 million loan aimed at saving homes

By Taryn Luna

Boston Community Capital plans to use the mortgage-backed loan from East Boston Savings Bank to buy properties and sell them back to owners.

A costly lesson at for-profit training schools

Lenny Holtzman, hairstylist to the Kennedys, worked on Paige Leavitt’s hair while assistant Genevieve Bothwell waited to color it.

By Megan Woolhouse

As graduates leave for-profit trade schools with plenty of debt but not enough skills to get hired, attorneys general are taking a closer look.

New York Times ‘pleased’ with Boston Globe interest

Times Co. chief executive Mark Thompson said the Globe is a “very distinct business from The New York Times.”

By Beth Healy

New York Times Co. chief executive Mark Thompson declined to discuss more concrete details of the sale process.

Obituaries

Richard Clayman, 65; lawyer proud of Chelsea roots

Richard Clayman discussed the Charles Stuart murder case and what the siblings — from left, Shelley Yandoli, Michael Stuart, Neysa Porter, and Mark Stuart — knew of the plot.

By Bryan Marquard

A memorable presence in court, Mr. Clayman also was a real estate developer with his brother, Steven, and a former Chelsea elected official.

Chuck Muncie, NFL Pro Bowl running back, dies at 60

Chuck Muncie played half of his nine seasons in San Diego.

By Erik Matuszewski

Mr. Muncie was a three-time Pro Bowl running back who once held the National Football League record for rushing touchdowns in a season.

Billie Sol Estes, 88; built Texas­-sized legacy of scandals

Billie Sol Estes arrived at court in El Paso, Texas, to face myriad federal charges.

By Robert D. McFadden

Mr. Estes became one of the most notorious men in America in 1962 when he was accused of looting a federal crop subsidy program.

Sports

rays 5, red sox 3

Red Sox can’t catch a break in latest loss

At 22-17, the Red Sox are now three games behind the Yankees.

By Peter Abraham

A would-be infield popup was lost in the roof at Tropicana Field, fell to the ground, and led to two game-winning runs for the Rays.

on baseball

David Ortiz reveals left oblique ailment

David Ortiz blasted a three-run homer off Tampa Bay lefthander Matt Moore in the first inning.

By Nick Cafardo

Ortiz said he’s been dealing with the injury for several weeks, and laughed at the suggestion his recent slump was caused by a Globe column.

Bruins fans’ emotions ran wild in game for the ages

Fans celebrated outside of TD Garden after the Bruins’ win on Monday.

By Bob Hohler

Across Boston - and beyond - Bruins fans bonded late Monday as the team pulled off an unexpected and historic comeback.

G: Food

Sampling the new sandwiches in town

The Chicken Katsu sandwich with Tonkatsu sauce, sweet potato fries, carrot laces, green leaf lettuce, a soft bun, and a free range chicken tempura breast at Wichit on Newbury Street.

By Matt Barber

Despite the recent surge of national chains, Boston has plenty of homegrown options for lunch.

Sandwich spots open after dark

Despite the proliferation of sandwich shops in our area, it’s still surprisingly hard to find places open after 5 p.m. Here are a few more open after dark.

dining out

Boston Chops is more than your typical steakhouse

An 8-ounce filet mignon with fries and arugula from Boston Chops.

By James Reed

From the portion sizes to the attention to detail to your bill, this is not a place for understatement.

More Stories

Taste Kitchen

Hummus tasting is a study in neutrals

By Debra Samuels

Sunday supper

Vegetarian paella one day, stuffed peppers the next

By Sally Pasley Vargas

Letter From Farm School

Dug in and flat out: planting time

By Erik Jacobs

travel | food

In Los Angeles, tacos from traditional to pho

By Luke Pyenson

Book Review

‘The Whispering Muse’ by Sjón

By Clea Simon

Galleries

What’s up at Boston-area art galleries

By Cate McQuaid

A tank away

Quaint meets contemporary in village of Woodstock, Vt.

By Diane Bair and and Pamela Wright

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Gisele Bundchen strikes a pose on yoga mat

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

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Scholz’s suit vs. Delp’s ex-wife is revived

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

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Jason Collins jersey to be auctioned by PFLAG

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

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Danny Amendola starts to fill Wes Welker’s shoes

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

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Trailer out for Tom Hanks’s ‘Captain Phillips’

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

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Boston Marathon benefit in Washington, D.C.

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

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Ari Seth Cohen says age is in your mind

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

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Audrey Hepburn’s son at UNICEF luncheon

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

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Celebrities spotted in and around town

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein