Front page

Andris Nelsons named new director of BSO

Andris Nelsons leads the BSO in Mahler’s Ninth Symphony at Carnegie Hall.

The Boston Symphony Orchestra announced Thursday the 34-year-old Nelsons would become the 15th music director.

Nelsons arrives with a reputation, earned mostly in Europe, for a rare combination of youthful dynamism and artistic substance.

Critic’s notebook

Andris Nelsons brings promise to the BSO

The new musical director opens an exciting and hopeful new chapter at the Boston Symphony Orchestra.

Edward Markey was first elected to Congress in 1976.

Longevity is Markey’s calling card, Gomez’s weapon

Newcomer Gabriel Gomez argues that Edward Markey has been in office too long, and is out of touch.

Note may offer details on bomb motive

Dzhokhar Tsarnaev left a note in the boat where he was captured calling bombing victims “collateral damage,” officials said.

Commuters boarded the Fairmount line train at the Talbot Avenue stop that opened last year.
City, state, and neighborhood planners hope the Fairmount line’s new stations will boost businesses, jobs, and development near the stops. Ridership on the line is poor.

Wendy Maeda/Globe Staff Wendy Maeda/Globe Staff

MBTA to open two new stations on Fairmount Line

The MBTA has spent more than $200 million on improvements to the commuter line, but ridership is low.

Big names coalesce around Charlotte Golar Richie

A small group of lawmakers and activists with ties to Mayor Thomas M. Menino is rallying around mayoral candidate Golar Richie.

The Nation

Justice Dept. lost track of 2 ex-terrorists, report says

Senator Charles Grassley said that Justice officials were being unduly secretive about the full classified report.

By Charlie Savage

The department briefly lost track of two former terrorists participating in its witness protection program, a new report disclosed.

Political notebook

Senate Republicans drop bid to stall EPA nominee

The Massachusetts native was approved by the Senate Committee on the Environment and Public Works by a party-line vote of 10-8.

Obama dodges question on Nixon comparisons

President Obama faced another day of tough questioning about the IRS, the Justice Department, and the Benghazi attack.

By Matt Viser

“I’ll let you guys engage in those comparisons,” President Obama said in reference to the president who resigned in disgrace in 1974.

The World

Bomber strikes US convoy, killing at least 16

The suicide car bomber destroyed several vehicles, including two armored SUVs carrying Americans.

By Matthew Rosenberg and Sangar Rahimi

A Toyota Corolla packed with explosives rammed a pair of US military vehicles in Kabul, setting off a blast that killed six Americans, ­Afghan officials said.

US, Turkey project unity in call for Assad to step aside

By Josh Lederman

The US president and the Turkish prime minister kept stark differences about how much the United States should intervene in Syria behind closed doors.

7 security agents abducted in Egypt

By Sarah El Deeb

Suspected militants in Egypt’s Sinai abducted seven security personnel as they headed to Cairo for holidays early Thursday, security officials said.

Editorial & Opinion

Lawrence Harmon

FBI too quiet on Quincy planes

Quincy resident Jennifer Azevedo-Andre photographed one of the planes.

By Lawrence Harmon

Withholding basic information is unfair to Quincy residents who have expressed numerous concerns to aviation officials and local police about the constant buzzing of aircraft overhead.

SCOT LEHIGH

Nixon all over again? Not even close.

By Scot Lehigh

Comparisons to Nixon are idiotic, and it’s the height of partisan absurdity to suggest that anything we’ve seen in these so-called scandals could justify impeachment.

JOAN WICKERSHAM

‘Scenes From a Marriage,’ as seen from a marriage

By Joan Wickersham

The movie reminds us how much trust and vulnerability there is in a marriage, how much power married people put into each other’s hands.

Metro

The Boston Marathon Wounded

Through pain, injured N.H. couple seeks joy

Alvaro Galvis said he was drawn by his wife Martha’s raven-haired beauty and her down-to-earth warmth. The Nashua couple met in 1974.

By Eric Moskowitz

Despite injuries sustained at the Marathon, Alvaro and Martha Galvis are concentrating on the happier moments of their lives.

Kevin Cullen

Praising Boston’s firefighters — because their bosses won’t

By Kevin Cullen

Instead of praising brave firefighters, the Boston fire commissioner called them “dinosaurs” so he and others can dismantle the department.

Harvard researchers grow nano-landscape

A new study details the process by which minerals can be made to assemble themselves into controlled, complex structures.

By Carolyn Y. Johnson

The lush garden of petals, twisting stems, and finely wrought leaves is invisible to the naked eye and best seen with an electron microscope.

More Stories

Note may offer details on bomb motive

By Maria Cramer and Peter Schworm

VERNON, CONN.

No threat to Quabbin ­Reservoir, State Police say

By Travis Andersen and Maria Cramer

Business

Two towers proposed at TD Garden

A rendering depicts the exterior view of the complex and towers that Delaware North Cos. and Boston Properties propose to build in front of TD Garden.

By Casey Ross

The two towers, which could reach 600 feet in height, would be occupied by restaurants, residences, offices, and a 200-room hotel.

Hotels approved for convention center area

By Casey Ross

The two hotels will be across from the Boston Convention & Exhibition Center, the first part of a proposed $2 billion expansion.

Boston Fed chief says budgets cuts, tax hikes hurting economy

Eric S. Rosengren, president of the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.

By Robert Gavin

Eric S. Rosengren called on Congress and President Obama to delay efforts to lower the deficit.

Obituaries

Vincent Dowling, 83; Irish director cofounded Chester Theatre Co.

Vincent Dowling, in 1994. “I love North Chester,” he said.

By Bryan Marquard

In 1990, Mr. Dowling cofounded what is now the Chester Theatre Company in a Western Massachusetts town of about 1,300 residents.

Al Fritz, 88; designed iconic Sting-Ray bikes in 1960s

A classic 1968 Schwinn (left), next to an updated model.

By Daniel E. Slotnik

Mr. Fritz created stylish roadsters yearned for by young hot-rodders in the 1960s and ’70s.

Robert Lindgren; dancer taught many in North Carolina

Mr. Lindgren, shown in New York, believed in training dancers in several dance idioms and styles.

By Anna Kisselgoff

Mr. Lindgren, 89, appeared with major American ballet companies before becoming the founding dean of the influential dance program at the North Carolina School of the Arts.

Sports

Bruins 3, Rangers 2

Bruins claim Game 1 vs. Rangers in OT

Brad Marchand was the (little) man in the middle, surrounded by Zdeno Chara and Dougie Hamilton, after Marchand scored in overtime of Game 1, his first of the postseason.

By Fluto Shinzawa

The Bruins came from behind to force overtime and won when Brad Marchand beat the Rangers’ Henrik Lundqvist at 15:40 into the extra period.

Christopher L. Gasper

Bruins just a little better than Rangers

Brad Marchand celebrated his game-winning goal in overtime.

By Christopher L. Gasper

Game 1 showed us that this will likely be a very tight series, and the Bruins are going to need all the goal-scoring they can get.

Red Sox 4, Rays 3

Red Sox rally past Rays in 9th inning

Pedro Ciriaco, left,  and Daniel Nava celebrated after they scored with Dustin Pedroia on a three-run double by Will Middlebrooks in the ninth inning.

By Peter Abraham

With two outs, Will Middlebrooks hit a three-run double to give the Sox a surprising come-from-behind win in Florida.

G: Arts & Movies

Movie Review

‘The Iceman’ inside the family man

Winona Ryder and Michael Shannon (also below) in “The Iceman,” based on the story of hit man Richard Kuklinski.

By Ty Burr

The true story of Richard “The Iceman” Kuklinski is a fascinating subject but director/co-writer Ariel Vromen blows it.

With new album, Paisley broadens his ‘Wheelhouse’

By Sarah Rodman

The country star hoped to make a statement on his new album by producing himself for the first time and writing about topics that mean something to him.

Classical Notes

Given time to write at BMOP, Norman produces ‘Play’

Composer Andrew Norman (right) demonstrates some of the unorthodox techniques called for when conductor Gil Rose (left) and the Boston Modern Orchestra Project play his music.

By David Weininger

Andrew Norman, who was a Pulitzer Prize finalist in 2012, has spent the past season and a half as the Boston Modern Orchestra Project’s composer in residence.

More Stories

Critic’s notebook

Andris Nelsons brings promise to the BSO

By Jeremy Eichler

Book Review

‘In the Body of the World’ by Eve Ensler

By Judy Bolton-Fasman

Stages

Icarus alights in the Dust Bowl

By Joel Brown

Movie Review

Camping trip gone awry in ‘Black Rock’

By Tom Russo

Movie Review

‘Bergdorf’: A great store, not a documentary

By Christopher Muther

Scene & Heard

Boston rapper H.W. dumps his demons

By Martín Caballero

Noisy Neighbors

Notoriety, ‘Well Rested’

By Martín Caballero

High Five

Joan Wasser on the future

By James Reed

Night Watch

Dancing on the Charles presents Crew Love BBQ

By Andrew Doerfler

Stage Review

ART’s ‘Pirates of Penzance’ is a fun trip

By Jeffrey Gantz

Names

Bradley Cooper’s strong show of support

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

Springsteen lends vocal to Dropkick Murphys song

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

Seth Meyers returning to ‘SNL’ for first half of fall season

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

Globe photographer in CNN doc about bombings

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

The Hawthorne hosts after party

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

Brandon Bass posts up at fundraiser for hospital

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

Century Bank’s Sloanes honored by Catholic Charities

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein