Front page

Egypt’s generals oust Morsi, create interim government

Morsi’s opponents celebrated his ouster in Cairo’s Tahrir Square.

Suhaib Salem/REUTERS

Egypt’s military officers removed the country’s first democratically elected president, suspended the constitution, and installed an interim government.

Lobsterman Bernie Feeney prepared to go out in Boston Harbor on his boat the Sandra Jean.

With warming seas, lobsters become an abundant bargain

Massachusetts lobstermen were paid about $3.74 per pound last week, just four cents more than a year ago when prices hit a record low.

Marathon victim payout method faulted

The Massachusetts Bar Association Wednesday called on Attorney General Martha Coakley to intervene in the awarding of One Fund compensation to Boston Marathon victims, contending that Ken Feinberg’s “rough justice” methodology has resulted in injustice for victims who have suffered long-term or permanent injuries that may leave them unable to work but who did not spend the requisite number of nights in the hospital to qualify for substantial compensation under Feinberg’s by-the-numbers system. Specifically, they cite a Boston woman who previously worked as an international development consultant and whose brain injury may leave her unable to hold down all but a menial job, and an Alabama primary-care physician whose hearing loss means he can no longer hear a patient’s heartbeat, each of whom was awarded $8,000, among a handful of mostly behind-the-scenes complainants. Feinberg says he did his best while putting a premium on time. “Solomon himself wouldn’t get consensus on this,” he said.

Bullets found in Hernandez apartment

In a search of former New England Patriot Aaron Hernandez’s Franklin apartment, State Police found numerous boxes of firearm ammunition and a hooded white sweatshirt possibly worn by Hernandez on the night prosecutors allege he orchestrated the killing of an acquaintance, Odin Lloyd, according to documents on file at Wrentham District Court. Hernandez has been charged with murder in Lloyd’s slaying, and two associates, Ernest Wallace and Carlos Ortiz, face charges in connection with the investigation.

John and Debbie Benedetto of Wakefield searched for 17 years to return medals.

Mark Lorenz for the Boston Globe (left) and Yoon S. Byun/Globe staff

Fallen soldier’s lost medals returned to his family

After finding four medals in 1996, a Wakefield couple took on a quest of bringing them back to the survivors of John F. Fitzgibbons.

The Nation

Postponing health rules emboldens Republicans

By Jackie Calmes and Robert Pear

The Obama administration’s decision to delay enforcing a pillar of the health care law raised new questions about the government’s preparedness to carry out the reform.

Cleveland kidnap suspect competent for trial

By John Coyne

A man charged with holding three women captive in his home for about decade is competent to stand trial, a judge ruled.

Yacht that capsized in N.Y. called overcrowded

By Frank Eltman

A yacht that capsized last year while leaving a July 4 fireworks show, killing three children, tipped over because it was overcrowded, a prosecutor said.

The World

Egypt’s generals oust Morsi, create interim government

Morsi’s opponents celebrated his ouster in Cairo’s Tahrir Square.

By David D. Kirkpatrick

Egypt’s military officers removed the country’s first democratically elected president, suspended the constitution, and installed an interim government.

Plane diversion causes uproar

Supporters of Bolivian President Evo Morales protested in front of the French Embassy in La Paz, Bolivia, on Wednesday.

By William Neuman, Rick Gladstone and Melissa Eddy

Latin American leaders condemned the refusal to let Bolivia’s president fly over Europe over suspicions that NSA leaker Edward Snowden was on board the plane.

UN notes decade of faster warming

Climate experts said global warming broke more countries’ temperature records than ever before in the first decade of the new millennium.

Editorial & Opinion

JOAN VENNOCHI

The last First Night?

Steve Rose and David Patterson of Ice Effects created this sculpture in 2004.

By Joan Vennochi

The celebration was a vital part of Boston’s renaissance, and it still brings value — especially after the Marathon attack.

alex beam

Talk about death, hold the sugar

By Alex Beam

The Death Café gatherings resemble the slightly better-known Philosophy Cafés, except participants discuss death.

NICHOLAS BURNS

Celebrate our commitment to liberty

By Nicholas Burns

In our time, the battle for liberty in the United States means extending full equality to African-Americans, women, and the gay and lesbian community.

More Stories

The Declaration of Independence

In Congress, July 4, 1776

letters | keeping our rights unalienable

Require clearance in all states

letters | should Massachusetts let its colors burst?

In Maine, allowing fireworks fizzled

letters | should Massachusetts let its colors burst?

Keep nuisances out of Bay State

letters | should Massachusetts let its colors burst?

Leave explosives to the professionals

Metro

Marathon victim payout method faulted

By Eric Moskowitz

The Massachusetts Bar Association called on Attorney General Martha Coakley to intervene in the awarding of One Fund compensation.

Bullets found in Hernandez apartment

By Mark Arsenault and Wesley Lowery

The discoveries from Aaron Hernandez’s Franklin apartment provide a window into the investigation as authorities build their case.

Holiday brings echoes of Marathon terror

Joanna Leigh: “It sounds like someone’s trying to kill you, and at this point, I have already had that happen. I don’t need more reminders of that.”

By David Abel

Nearly three months after the Marathon bombings, some are struggling with the sound from fireworks.

More Stories

Veteran, 27, fatally shot in Stoneham

By Brian Ballou and Brian MacQuarrie

Yvonne Abraham

Bill Walczak flying below the radar

By Yvonne Abraham

Pawtucket, R.I.

R.I. man charged with drunk driving in Attleboro

By Melissa Hanson

Boston

Madison Park High headmaster selected

By James Vaznis

Markey may get sworn in Wednesday

By Michael Levenson

Business

With warming seas, lobsters become an abundant bargain

Lobsterman Bernie Feeney prepared to go out in Boston Harbor on his boat the Sandra Jean.

By Taryn Luna

Massachusetts lobstermen were paid about $3.74 per pound last week, just four cents more than a year ago when prices hit a record low.

Water Wizz in Wareham rides Hollywood wave

Nine-year-old Chase Barrington, of Bourne, descended the Devil’s Peak slide at Water Wizz in East Wareham.

By Gail Waterhouse

The eight-acre water park in Wareham acts as the background for much Steve Carell’s independent comedy, “The Way, Way Back.”

Car rental options at Logan expand; debate likely to grow

FlightCar chief executive Rujul Zaparde is facing a lawsuit over the firm’s operations at San Francisco’s airport.

By Katie Johnston

The airport has become a hot spot in the car sharing world, with two companies offering the service.

Obituaries

Ted Hood, 86; skippered Courageous to 1974 America’s Cup victory

Ted Hood guided Courageous through Boston Harbor in 1988. He was inducted into the America’s Cup Hall of Fame in 1993 and 
into the National Sailing Hall of Fame in 2011.

By Kathleen McKenna

Mr. Hood became one of highest-regarded people in the sailing world over the past 60 years by virtue of being one the most versatile.

Charles Carr, 79, driver on the night Hank Williams died

Charles Carr in 2007 at the Williams family graves in Montgomery, Ala. Below, an undated  publicity photo of Hank Williams. Mr. Carr directed the Hank Williams Museum.

By Bob Johnson

Mr. Carr was just a college freshman when he drove country music legend Hank Williams on his final, lonesome journey six decades ago.

Douglas Engelbart, 88; changed computers with mouse

Mr. Engelbart’s 1968 mouse introduction was called “the mother of all demos.”

By John Markoff

Mr. Engelbart led a host of inventions.

Sports

on basketball

Celtics’ hire of Brad Stevens a great one

Brad Stevens has been the head coach at Butler University for six seasons.

By Gary Washburn

In basketball circles, the coach from Butler University is considered one of the bright young minds in the game.

Christopher L. Gasper

Celtics job a big leap for Brad Stevens

Way before coaching the Celtics, Bill Fitch jumped from college to the NBA in 1970.

By Christopher L. Gasper

The Celtics’ new coach has never worked in the NBA, and the recent history of college coaches going pro is littered with failure.

Celtics name Brad Stevens head coach

Brad Stevens was hired by the Celtics as the franchise’s 17th head coach.

By Baxter Holmes

Butler University’s Brad Stevens, one of college basketball’s brightest young stars, has been named the 17th head coach in Celtics history.

G: Style

The man bun finds an audience

Chris Hemsworth (above) wears the mun well, as do David Beckham and Gavin Rossdale (top center, right), but Joakim Noah (top left) . . . not so much.

By Christopher Muther

The coiffure informally known as “the mun” — or man bun — has arrived in Boston, but it’s definitely not for every man.

Fallen soldier’s lost medals returned to his family

John and Debbie Benedetto of Wakefield searched for 17 years to return medals.

By Joseph P. Kahn

After finding four medals in 1996, a Wakefield couple took on a quest of bringing them back to the survivors of John F. Fitzgibbons.

Ask Martha

Beekeeping is fun and healthy hobby

There are many delicious uses — and decorative containers — for your own hive-produced honey.

By Martha Stewart

There are many delicious uses — and decorative containers — for your own hive-produced honey.