Front page

A hint of assent on debt ceiling

The first cracks seemed to appear in House Republican resolve to use the federal debt limit as a bargaining chip over President Obama’s health care law and other GOP priorities.

$54m later, state fired computer contractor

State Department of Revenue fired Deloitte, the firm tied to snarls at the Labor Department, as defects became obvious.

David Koch funds day care at MIT

The billionaire philanthropist’s donation shows a move toward supporting work-life balance for MIT employees.

Red Sox skill and spirit were on display when Mike Napoli’s 11th-inning walkoff homer sank the Yankees in July.

Oct. 3, 2013

Red Sox are Boston’s redeemed team

The 2013 Red Sox understood that they had to be better than the previous edition, which went off the rails like an errant Riverside trolley.

Nineteen Dunkin’ Donuts have been robbed in the state since March.

Dunkin’ Donuts stores suffer rash of nighttime robberies

Since March, there have been at least 19 robberies of Dunkin’ locations in Mass., the latest at a Newton that was also robbed in July.

The Nation

Police shoot, kill Conn. woman at Capitol

US Capitol Police surrounded a black sedan with guns drawn at the corner of Pennsylvania Avenue and First Street NW in Washington on Thursday.

By Peter Hermann, Ed O’Keefe and David A. Fahrenthold

The driver was fatally shot after leading police on a chase through Washington that brought a new jolt of fear to a city already rattled.

Congressional pay, health care benefits under scrutiny

A protester’s mouth was covered with a dollar bill during a demonstration in front of the US Capitol.

By Tracy Jan

Paychecks for lawmakers, which continue to flow amid the government shutdown, have been the subject of political criticism and mockery all week.

political notebook

Obama cancels rest of trip to Asia

Lieutenant governor John Walsh will run for Senate in Montana, giving Democrats hope they can hold the seat.

President Obama canceled a trip to Asia next week because of the government shutdown, the White House said Thursday.

The World

Trawler packed with migrants capsizes near Sicilian island

Bodies of migrants were lined up in the port of Lampedusa, Sicily, on Thursday. About 250 people are still missing.

By Jim Yardley and Elisabetta Povoledo

The accident, which occurred before dawn Thursday off the island of Lampedusa, is one of the worst in recent memory in the Mediterranean.

Agreement allows US to fly drones from base in Japan

By Craig Whitlock and Anne Gearan

The US military will deploy long-range Global Hawk surveillance drones from Japan next year, American and Japanese officials announced.

India kills law allowing convicts in Congress

By Abhijit Roy Chowdhury and Bibhudatta Pradhan

Prime Minister Manmohan Singh of India withdrew an order that allowed convicted lawmakers to retain office after a public rebuke from the Gandhi family.

Editorial & Opinion

JOAN WICKERSHAM

Boston’s inanity trail

By Joan Wickersham

Sightseeing may be inherently superficial, but tours can do better than a jumble of table scraps and the musical theme from a defunct TV show.

LAWRENCE HARMON

A nicely packaged gift from Menino

By Lawrence Harmon

Mayor Menino’s transition blog will leave his successor with what should be the best practical guide to municipal government.

opinion | Linda J. Bilmes

No day at the national parks

Acadia National Park in Maine is now closed.

By Linda J. Bilmes

Normally some 700,000 visitors visit the parks every day, and the National Park Service also plays a vital role in education.

Metro

T, union feud over arbitrator’s award

By Martine Powers

The award, the subject of dueling lawsuits from the MBTA and Boston Carmen’s Union Local 589, calls for workers’ salaries to increase by an average of 10.4 percent.

kevin cullen

Still inspiring others

BECCA ROSENTHAL

By Kevin Cullen

Becca Rosenthal is the antithesis of the Philistines in Washington. She’s dead and buried a year, and she still makes more sense than they ever will.

Peace activist’s nephew slain in Roxbury

Isaura Mendes was comforted by friend James Hills 
Thursday after the death of her nephew Leroy Carvalho the day before. In years past, she lost two of her sons to street violence.

By Travis Andersen and Jeremy C. Fox

Isaura Mendes, who previously saw two of her sons killed in street violence, issued an emotional plea after the death of Leroy Carvalho.

More Stories

Oct. 3, 2013

Red Sox are Boston’s redeemed team

By John Powers

David Koch funds day care at MIT

By Carolyn Y. Johnson

Business

Athenahealth steps up to track influenza

Athenahealth offers cloud-based electronic health record, practice management, and care coordination services.

By Robert Weisman

With the CDC sidelined by the government shutdown, the company said it will track and post flu information on its own website.

Shirley Leung

The Seaport’s Silver Line solution

By Shirley Leung

So when the Silver Line is overcrowded, the T can just add buses, right? Well, no.

Banks offer assistance to furloughed workers

By Emily Overholt

With thousands of federal employees going without pay during the government shutdown, some banks are offering ways to give the furloughed workers a break.

Obituaries

Marie ‘Missy’ Cousy, devoted wife of Celtics legendary guard

Missie and Bob Cousy, shown with daughters Ticia and Marie, were married for 63 years.

By Dianne Williamson

“Our marriage was somewhat contrary to tradition,” said her husband, Bob. “We had the best and most romantic part of our marriage at the end.”

Harold Agnew, helped build early atomic bombs; at 92

Dr. Agnew helped perfect more portable H-bombs.

By William J. Broad

Dr. Agnew was the last surviving major figure present at the birth of the nuclear age.

A.C. Lyles, 95; was veteran Hollywood producer

A.C. Lyles reached toward a portrait of Ann Miller during a funeral for the dancer and actress in 2004.

By John Rogers

Mr. Lyles rose from mail boy to producer at Paramount Pictures and became the studio’s longest-serving employee.

Sports

Bruins 3, Lightning 1

Shorthanded goals help Bruins prevail in opener

Torey Krug (right) celebrated with Patrice Bergeron (left) and Adam McQuaid after Bergeron’s goal in the third period.

By Amalie Benjamin

The Bruins generated some of their best offensive chances when down a man, starting with Chris Kelly drawing a penalty shot.

This could be the start of something big for Bruins

Bruins captain  Zdeno Chara is greeted by fans as the team comes down the runway for pregame warm-ups.

By Kevin Paul Dupont

Thursday was a night made for scoring, fighting, winning and wiping out the memory of a lost chance to win a Cup just over three months earlier, writes Kevin Paul Dupont.

Starting pitchers feel fully armed

A multiple exposure photo of Red Sox starting pitcher Jon Lester pitching against the Toronto Blue Jays.

By John Powers

With a staff that is rested and ready, manager John Farrell can spin his rotation any way he wants to in the playoffs.

More Stories

Dan Shaughnessy

Do not take the Red Sox’ success for granted

By Dan Shaughnessy

Christopher L. Gasper

Red Sox couldn’t rise without last year’s crash

By Christopher L. Gasper

on hockey

Jordan Caron emerges in Bruins’ 3-1 win

By Fluto Shinzawa

Bruins Notebook

Bruins pen Dennis Seidenberg to four-year, $16m deal

By Amalie Benjamin

Dodgers 6, Braves 1

NLDS: Clayton Kershaw pitches Dodgers over Braves

By Paul Newberry

Cardinals 9, Pirates 1

NLDS: Cardinals rout Pirates in Game 1

By R.B. Fallstrom

Downs & Distance

Coast Guard coach dodges furlough penalty

By Jim McBride

PATRIOTS NOTEBOOK

Kenbrell Thompkins putting it together for Patriots

By Michael Whitmer

CELTICS NOTEBOOK

Kelly Olynyk wants to be more defensive

By Baxter Holmes

BC-Army game will go ahead

By Michael Vega

Schools

Football: Holliston, Westwood square off

By Stephen Sellner

G: Arts & Movies

Movie Review

Strap in for the astonishing ride that is ‘Gravity’

Sandra Bullock as Ryan Stone in “Gravity.”

By Ty Burr

Director Alfonso Cuarón’s movie is a visually painstaking state-of-the-art production that advances what the cinema can show us.

Book Review

‘Radio Free Boston’ by Carter Alan

Charles Laquidarain 1972.

By Sarah Rodman

In this captivating chronicle, former deejay/music director Carter Alan recalls WBCN’s crazy days — and its eventual demise.

Miranda July isn’t done until the audience speaks

“When I’m doing something live in front of an audience. . .  I’m trying to get at what is live about it — what is the sort of present moment that particular night, those particular people, us in a room together,” Miranda July said.

By Laura Collins-Hughes

The performance artist will bring a brand-new participatory piece to the Institute of Contemporary Art with her e-mail address in the program.

More Stories

Photography review

Panopticon shows focus on the fundamentals

By Mark Feeney

Classical notes

Cappella Clausura opens programming — to men

By David Weininger

Movie Review

Paternity is tested in ‘Mother’

By Peter Keough

Television Review

‘Witches’ a bland stew

By Matthew Gilbert

Television Review

Muhammad Ali and the Supreme Court on HBO

By Matthew Gilbert

Television Review

‘The Paradise’ takes on class and commerce

By Matthew Gilbert

Noisy Neighbors

Meg Hutchinson, ‘Beyond That’

By James Reed

High Five

Tony Trischka and unique players

By James Reed

events

Boston-area to do list

By June Wulff

Love Letters

Keeping it casual

Names

Ann Romney, promoting new book, opens up

By Peggy Hernandez

Names

Andris Nelsons subject of new DVD

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

MFA is pretty in pink

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

The Toledos make appearance at Boston Fashion Week

By Mark shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

‘Chicks Dig Bigs’ party at Blue Inc.

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

Mark Wahlberg sued for sampling song way back when

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

Ang Lee will screen ‘The Wedding Banquet’ in Boston

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein