Front page

Senate leaders close to deal to open government, avert default

Senate leaders said they were on the verge of a deal that would re-open normal government functions and stave off a calamitous debt default.

Mayoral candidate Martin J. Walsh campaigned at Viet Aid Gala at the IBEW union Local 103 in Dorchester earlier this month.

Union voter effort in full swing in mayor’s race

Labor unions are ramping up their efforts to sway voters and encourage them to vote as the Boston mayoral contest enters its home stretch.

Eugene Fama received the Nobel Prize for his work showing the randomness and undpredictability of the stock market.

An economics Nobel with roots in Mass.

Before Eugene Fama set his sights on economics, he was studying romance languages at Tufts University and planned to become a high school teacher.

Nicole Fluet McGerald (right) assisted at a race in Hampton, N.H., Oct. 6 in which colleague Amanda McCann ran.

First responders still in grip of Marathon’s horror

Six months after the Marathon bombings, the terror of that long, frantic afternoon on Boylston Street still haunts many of those who treated the wounded.

Reenactors portraying German and US troops collided in a scene that was eerily real.

Critic’s Notebook

WWII reenactment explores the theater of war

Welcome back to World War II and to the world of historical reenactments, which just might be one of the hottest forms of theater around.

The Nation

Senate leaders close to deal to open government, avert default

The Senate’s majority leader Harry Reid (pictured) and minority leader Mitch McConnell said they were near a resolution.

By Noah Bierman and Mattias Gugel

Senate leaders said they were on the verge of a deal that would re-open normal government functions and stave off a calamitous debt default.

Calif. transit strike averted for now

San Francisco-area transit lines ran Monday after a deadline was extended.

San Francisco Bay Area commuters faced another day of uncertainty as a major regional transit agency held talks under the ever-present threat of a strike.

Care, CEO pay not linked, study says

Chief executive officers at nonprofit hospitals earned an average of $600,000 a year, but there was no correlation between high pay and good outcomes for patients.

The World

Syrian rebels told to let inspectors visit chemical sites

By Alan Cowell

Pressure mounted on Syrian rebels Monday to permit access to chemical weapons sites in areas under their control.

What lies ahead for weapons inspectors

A look at the work of the international team charged with destroying Syria’s chemical weapons stockpile.

Malaysia court rules non-Muslims can’t use ‘Allah’

A Malaysian appeals court on Monday upheld a government ban against the use of the word ‘‘Allah’’ to refer to God in non-Muslim faiths.

Editorial & Opinion

Betsy Nabel

Measured in human terms

By Betsy Nabel

The federal shutdown’s impact on biomedical research has had a negative effect on real people.

TOM KEANE

Columbus Day — a holiday without a hero

By Tom Keane

Christopher Columbus was an enormously brutal and cruel man who enslaved and subjugated the natives he encountered.

PAUL MCMORROW

A Boston of rich and poor, with no middle class

The Kensington in Downtown Crossing.

By Paul McMorrow

Boston has had a difficult time lately building anything but luxury residential complexes, and it’s threatening to choke the life out of the city.

Metro

First responders still in grip of Marathon’s horror

Nicole Fluet McGerald (right) assisted at a race in Hampton, N.H., Oct. 6 in which colleague Amanda McCann ran.

By David Abel

Six months after the Marathon bombings, the terror of that long, frantic afternoon on Boylston Street still haunts many of those who treated the wounded.

TV debate offers new test for mayoral hopefuls

Mayoral candidates Martin Walsh and John Connolly shook hands as they crossed paths in between visits to a group of sixth graders.

By Wesley Lowery

Observers say the one-on-one debates will be less forgiving for John Connolly and Martin Walsh than the crowded forums during the preliminary race.

Bronze thoroughbred draws admirers to Newton yard

Robert Gaynor has always loved horses, and his sculpture Flashy Bull is a reflection of that.

By Joel Brown

Flashy Bull, a handsome thoroughbred, stands eight feet high and 11 feet long from nose to tail. And, despite the raised hoof and flared tail, it never moves.

Business

An economics Nobel with roots in Mass.

Eugene Fama received the Nobel Prize for his work showing the randomness and undpredictability of the stock market.

By Katie Johnston

Before Eugene Fama set his sights on economics, he was studying romance languages at Tufts University and planned to become a high school teacher.

Worcester’s revival proving elusive

A photo from December 2012 shows a 21-acre swath of Worcester targeted for renewal as part of the CitySquare project.

By Lonnie Shekhtman

Ten years ago, Worcester’s downtown was going to hum. But today, the $565 million CitySquare project is still a far-off promise.

Union voter effort in full swing in mayor’s race

Mayoral candidate Martin J. Walsh campaigned at Viet Aid Gala at the IBEW union Local 103 in Dorchester earlier this month.

By Beth Healy

Labor unions are ramping up their efforts to sway voters and encourage them to vote as the Boston mayoral contest enters its home stretch.

Obituaries

Katharine D. Kane, 78; Boston’s first female deputy mayor

At the Office of Cultural Affairs, Mrs. Kane helped launch a program that brought the arts to Boston neighborhoods.

By Emma Stickgold

Though slight and soft-spoken, Mrs. Kane was known and respected for her deft, fearless approach to dealing with City Hall’s power brokers.

Maxine Powell, 98; ran Motown ‘finishing school’

Ms. Powell was honored at the Motown Historical Museum on Aug. 26.

By Mike Householder

Ms. Powell, was responsible for developing the charm, grace, and style of Motown Records’ artists during the Detroit label’s 1960s heyday.

Sports

DAN SHAUGHNESSY

Red Sox’ comeback now has iconic image

The picture that says it all.

By Dan Shaughnessy

The picture of Torii Hunter tumbling over the fence and a Boston police officer celebrating David Ortiz’s home run is now part of Red Sox lore.

ON BASEBALL

What we’ve learned about the Red Sox and Tigers

Prince Fielder evaded a tag by Boston Red Sox second baseman Dustin Pedroia during Game 2 of the ALCS.

By Nick Cafardo

The Tigers are slow collection of base-cloggers with terrific starting pitching. The Red Sox have a stellar bullpen, with much still to be decided.

RED WINGS 3, BRUINS 2

Bruins work hard, but fall short

Bruins winger Brad Marchand jousts with Detroit’s Luke Glendening during second-period action. (Matthew J. Lee/Globe staff)

By Amalie Benjamin

The Bruins’ attempt at a comeback fell short as they lost to the Red Wings, 3-2, in a holiday matinee at TD Garden.

G: Living

Pocket guide to the Boston Book Festival

A selection of the more than 60 panels, readings, and appearances at this year’s Boston Book Festival.

Q&A

Boston Book Festival has its own plot

By Eugenia Williamson

Deborah Porter, executive director of the Boston Book Festival, founded the BBF in 2009 and Boston’s One Story, One City program the following year. Today she oversees a staff of three and a corps of about 200 volunteers. In the past five years, as the festival has expanded to multiple days, attendance has risen to 25,000.

Stage Review

‘Exit’ crackles but doesn’t set the issue afire

From left: Mary-Liz Murray, Tim Hoover, and Cameron Beaty Gosselin in Lauren Gunderson’s play “Exit, Pursued by a Bear.”

By Terry Byrne

With “Exit, Pursued by a Bear,” playwright Lauren Gunderson employs humorous theatrical devices to tackle the serious subject of domestic abuse.