Front page

Obama yields on below-par insurance

Bowing to pressure from allies, President Obama issued a one-year reprieve for coverage that falls short of the new standards.

Mayor James Diossa (left) and planning director Steve Larrick are trying to return a sense of pride to Central Falls, R.I.

Glenn Osmundson For the Boston Globe

R.I. town looks to crowdfunding to deal with finance woes

A group of energetic city leaders has set an unlikely goal: to give Central Falls an identity as a model of modern government.

Digitized footage includes a 1991 Barack Obama speech.

WGBH helps digitize history

WGBH and the Library of Congress are creating the first comprehensive digital archive of content from the nation’s public broadcasters.

In this courtroom sketch, James

Jane Flavell Collins/AP

Bulger sentenced, escorted from sight

James “Whitey” Bulger was sentenced to two consecutive terms of life in prison by a judge who lamented his misplaced mythology.

kevin cullen

//c.o0bg.com/rf/image_90x90/Boston/2011-2020/2013/11/14/BostonGlobe.com/Metro/Images/Kevin_Cullen_150px-9402.jpg Judge supplies full picture of Bulger’s empty existence

“The scope, the callousness, the depravity of your crimes are almost unfathomable,” Judge Denise Casper told Whitey Bulger at his sentencing.

Police seek link between burned human remains

Surveillance footage from Hyde Park shows a person throwing something on the ground and setting it on fire. Burned remains were also found in Bridgewater.

The Nation

US mobility for young adults falls to 50-year low

By Hope Yen

The new 2013 figures from the Census Bureau, which reversed earlier signs of recovery, underscore the impact of the sluggish economy on young people.

Texas county makes major policy shift to protect LGBT inmates

By Ramit Plushnick-Masti

The Harris County sheriff adopted a policy that outlines how gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender inmates will be searched, booked, and housed.

Obama yields on below-par insurance

The president bowed to party pressure.

By Tracy Jan and Noah Bierman

Bowing to pressure from allies, President Obama issued a one-year reprieve for coverage that falls short of the new standards.

The World

In hard-hit region, a grim process begins

Burials began Thursday in Tacloban, six days after the typhoon. The mayor blamed the national government for the delay.

By Austin Ramzy and Keith Bradsher

Pausing occasionally to dodge driving rains, a group of firefighters lowered unidentified bodies into a mass grave in the Philippines.

Toronto mayor denies harassing aide

With his wife, Renata, Mayor Rob Ford spoke at a news conference at Toronto City Hall.

By Rob Gillies

In an obscenity-laced statement on live television, Mayor Rob Ford said he did not harass a female employee.

Hezbollah forces to remain in Syria

Hezbollah chief Hassan Nasrallah made a rare public appearance at a Shi’ite holiday event Thursday in southern Beirut. His fighters have been assisting Syrian forces.

By Alan Cowell and Anne Barnard

The head of the militant group, whose armed followers are fighting on the side of President Bashar Assad, pledged that his forces would stay.

Editorial & Opinion

SCOT LEHIGH

Is Obama up to saving his health law?

President Obama.

By Scot Lehigh

President Obama needs to do something this administration has failed to do: Explain why this law should be a good thing.

opinion | JOSHUA GREEN

The GOP’s opportunity

Dark clouds loomed over the US Capitol in Washington on Sept. 28, 2013.

By Joshua Green

Though polls show that the health care debacle has given the Republican Party a boost, its members are busy demonstrating that they have no idea how to govern.

editorial

Fourth grade test scores sound a warning bell

In grade four reading, the average score for Massachusetts students fell by five points, one of just a few statistically significant declines seen across the nation.

More Stories

letters | Olympics in Boston: Golden opportunity or five-ring circus?

Hosting Games is a mixed bag, which too many are left holding

letters | Olympics in Boston: Golden opportunity or five-ring circus?

We should welcome bold bid to envision Hub as host

letters | Olympics in Boston: Golden opportunity or five-ring circus?

Proposal raises questions, if not hackles

letters | Olympics in Boston: Golden opportunity or five-ring circus?

For a world-class event, we’ll need public toilets

letters | Olympics in Boston: Golden opportunity or five-ring circus?

Ego, legacy are no basis for pushing this agenda

Metro

Brigham and Women’s doctor could be next US surgeon general

Dr. Vivek Hallegere Murthy

By Jeremy C. Fox and Nicholas Jacques

Dr. Vivek Hallegere Murthy, 36, will be nominated by President Obama to become the nation’s 19th surgeon general.

Ivory crushed to highlight slaughter of elephants

US Fish and Wildlife Service officers carried ivory tusks to a crusher to be pulverized at a facility in Colorado Thursday.

By Beth Daley

A 6-ton ivory stockpile was destroyed Thursday as part of a massive US government effort to highlight the increased killing of the animals for their tusks.

kevin cullen

Judge supplies full picture of Bulger’s empty existence

US District Court Judge Denise Casper (center) spoke Thursday at the sentencing hearing for convicted crime boss James “Whitey” Bulger (right). At left was Bulger’s attorney, J.W. Carney Jr.

By Kevin Cullen

“The scope, the callousness, the depravity of your crimes are almost unfathomable,” Judge Denise Casper told Whitey Bulger at his sentencing.

More Stories

Police seek link between burned human remains

By Maria Cramer and Brian MacQuarrie

Bulger sentenced, escorted from sight

By Shelley Murphy and Milton J. Valencia

US attorney will not appeal ruling in Sampson case

By Milton J. Valencia and John R. Ellement

REVERE

Man is struck and killed by train in Revere

By Nicholas Jacques

Business

More woes for jobless system

By Beth Healy

The state’s troubled unemployment claim system is generating new problems: threatening to garnish tax refunds to cover alleged overpayments.

Shirley Leung

After Fidelity, Peter Lynch turns to schools

“You cannot go anywhere in the education of children and not find the fingerprints of Carolyn and Peter,” said Jack Connors, a close friend.

By Shirley Leung

Peter Lynch, the legendary Fidelity investor, and his wife Carolyn have donated more than $100 million to powerfully shape education in Boston.

Government Center redevelopment approved

By Casey Ross

The plan is to demolish one of the city’s most enduring eyesores to make way for a towering complex of offices, residences, and stores.

Obituaries

Robert L. Kierstead, 85; longtime Globe ombudsman

Robert L. Kierstead said he fielded about 30,000 calls and letters from readers.

By Bryan Marquard

In nine years as the Globe’s “readers’ representative and advocate,” Mr. Kierstead estimated he fielded more than 30,000 calls and letters from readers.

Todd Christensen, 57; former NFL tight end

Todd Christensen made a catch against Seattle in 1983. A running back in college, he was selected for five Pro Bowls.

By Paul Foy

Mr. Christensen, a five-time Pro Bowl selection and two-time Super Bowl winner, died of complications during liver transplant surgery.

Leonard Herzenberg, 81; immunologist who revolutionized research

By Douglas Martin

Dr. Herzenberg created a machine that counted cells under a microscope, which helped facilitate stem cell research.

Sports

on baseball

Like it or not, replay will be part of baseball

Video replay determined this hit by Ryan Lavarnway during a September game against the Tigers was, in fact, a home run. MLB plans to expand its use of video replay in 2014.

By Nick Cafardo

Change is always tough in a game based so much on tradition. Those of us who have resisted change will just have to adapt.

Bruins 3, Blue Jackets 2 | OT

Lucic’s breakaway goal brings Bruins victory

Milan Lucic scored the game-winning goal in overtime.

By Fluto Shinzawa

The Bruins won their fourth straight game after Milan Lucic slipped the puck past the Blue Jackets’ Sergei Bobrovsky in overtime.

Patriots may get back Vereen and Talib

Talib suffered a hip injury in the second half of the Week 6 win over the Saints.

By Shalise Manza Young

Signs point to Shane Vereen and Aqib Talib returning in time for the stretch against the Panthers and Broncos.

More Stories

red sox notebook

Bullpen depth offseason priority

By Peter Abraham

the bettor’s edge

The Patriots will be a good pick this week

By Ed Ryan

patriots notebook

Carolina Panthers pose running threat

By Michael Whitmer

Colts 30, Titans 27

Indianapolis rallies again in 2d half for another victory

By Teresa M. Walker

Akron at UMass | 1 p.m. Saturday

UMass seniors helping to shape football program

By Nancy Marrapese-Burrell

Downs & Distance

Another familiar foe for Mark Richt, Georgia

By Jim McBride

bruins notebook

Jim Benning being considered for Sabres GM

By Fluto Shinzawa

Names

Philanthropist Joan Parker celebrated at BU

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

celtics notebook

Jared Sullinger ‘shocked’ by his back improvement

By Baxter Holmes

Men’s basketball: Toledo 95, Boston College 92

Eagles fall to 0-3 after being surprised by Toledo

By Michael Vega

COLLEGE HOCKEY

For New Hampshire, hard work is paying off

By Nancy Marrapese-Burrell

fantasy football

Time to manage your fantasy roster

By Ed Ryan

G: Arts & Movies

The icy relationship that inspired ‘The Cocktail Hour’

Richard Poe and Maureen Anderman are father and mother in A. R. Gurney’s play about his parents, “The Cocktail Hour,” at the BU Theatre.

By Joel Brown

Huntington Theatre Company presents A. R. Gurney’s unabashedly autobiographical 1988 play about his parents at the Boston University Theatre through Dec. 15.

Photography review

Blue and Gray in black and white at Bowdoin College

Martin Johnson Heade’s “Newburyport Marshes, a Passing Storm” is one of 25 items in “ ‘This Mighty Scourge of War’: Art of the American Civil War.”

By Mark Feeney

The photographs and paintings in “ ‘This Mighty Scourge of War’: Art of the American Civil War” are examples of how wide-ranging the exhibit is, despite its small scale.

Classical Notes

‘Written on Skin’ recorded, Britten celebrated live

From left: Augustine Mercante, Evan Hughes, Lauren Snouffer, and George Benjamin at Tanglewood in August.

By David Weininger

Where to find recordings and performances of George Benjamin’s opera “Written on Skin” and Benjamin Britten’s music.

More Stories

Book Review

‘Dark Lies the Island’ by Kevin Barry

By Laura Collins-Hughes

Noisy Neighbors

New Dog, ‘Lost Weekend’

By Luke O'Neil

High Five

Tim Hoey’s music training

By Steph Hiltz

Night Watch

FOOTBALLZ Live commentary

By Vanessa Fernandes

events

Boston-area to do list

By June Wulff

music review

Rick Ross heats up after low-key start

By Marc Hirsh

Music Review

Greek violinist Kavakos takes to conducting

By David Weininger

names

Bill Maher to Boston: ‘Your city was not leveled by Godzilla’

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

Denis Leary unhappy with Bill Maher’s ‘ill-advised’ barb

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

Larry David tells Emerson kids to carry a notebook

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

Fallon’s head monologue writer comes back to Boston

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

Chez Henri will close Sunday

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

Elizabeth Banks brings ‘Catching Fire’ to Germany

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

Around town: Rob Gronkowski, Jody Adams, Vince Vaughn

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein