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Two Franklin children die in hope chest

Lexi and Sean Munroe “were the most wonderful, loving children,’’ their uncle Eric Munroe said Monday.

FAMILY PHOTO VIA FACEBOOK

Lexi Munroe, 8, and her brother, Sean, 7, were playing in a chest that could not be opened from the inside, leaving them to suffocate.

The MBTA has a long history of discrimination complaints filed against it by both minority and women employees.

MBTA nears antibias agreement with US regulators

The MBTA has a long history of discrimination complaints filed against it by both minority and women employees.

Mass. to give $50m for storm, flood protection

Most of the money will be distributed help cities and towns install backup power systems using clean technologies.

Harvard’s Farish Jenkins died in 2012, before research he helped conduct was published.

SUZANNE KREITER/GLOBE STAFF/FILE 2006

From ancient fish, insight into origin of limbs

New research suggests that we can trace our arms — and our legs — to the fins of a 375-million-year-old fish.

“It may be a little more interesting and a little more dynamic than elsewhere because the government has intervened for an extended period of time,” said Partners CEO Gary Gottlieb on the Massachusetts market.

Partners promises a new model for health care

Partners HealthCare System’s top executives said further expansion in Eastern Mass. will lower costs and improve medical care.

The Nation

Justices voice doubts on Obama recess appointments

By Adam Liptak

Supreme Court justices appeared skeptical of the Obama administration’s contention that it could appoint officials while the Senate was on a short break.

Safe water running again in parts of W. Virginia

Al Jones of the West Virginia department of General Services tested the water as he flushed the faucet and opened a restroom on the first floor of the State Capitol in Charleston, West Virginia.

By Jonathan Mattise

It could still be days before everyone in the Charleston metropolitan area is cleared to use the water.

Chris Christie’s use of US ad dollars probed

New Jersey lawmakers on Monday outlined a legislative investigation of the George Washington Bridge gridlock.

By Marc Santora

Federal investigators are scrutinizing the Christie administration’s spending of relief funds in New Jersey after Hurricane Sandy.

The World

Syria may allow aid to reach besieged cities

Buildings in Daraya, southwest of Damascus, burned as opposition forces fought Syrian government troops on Sunday.

By Michael R. Gordon

The Syrian government has told Russia it may be prepared to allow the delivery of aid to certain besieged areas.

Israel bids farewell to defiant defender

Shimon Peres, Israel’s president, called Ariel Sharon “the shoulder on whom Israel’s security rested.”

By Jodi Rudoren

Ariel Sharon, who became a prime minister both revered and reviled, was buried Monday.

Protesters flood Bangkok commercial district

Opposition leader Suthep Thaugsuban spoke during Monday’s demonstration in Bangkok.

By Thomas Fuller

The largely peaceful demonstration cut most traffic to Thailand’s costliest real estate and most prestigious addresses.

Editorial & Opinion

Opinion | TOM KEANE

How to manage a crisis

New Jersey Governor Chris Christie spoke during a news conference Thursday.

By Tom Keane

Chris Christie’s political obituary may need to wait, thanks to his two-hour remarks in the wake of the George Washington Bridge scandal.

Steven M. Rothstein

A school built by abolitionists — and a slaver

By Steven M. Rothstein

The Perkins School for the Blind was named for a Boston merchant who donated his home to the school, and who profited from the slave trade.

PAUL MCMORROW

Allston rail yard is ripe for growth

Beacon Park Yard in Allston.

By Paul McMorrow

The desolate, 140-acre Beacon Park Yard has the potential to be the site of Boston’s next great building boom.

Metro

Two Franklin children die in hope chest

Lexi and Sean Munroe “were the most wonderful, loving children,’’ their uncle Eric Munroe said Monday.

By David Abel, Peter Schworm and John R. Ellement

Lexi Munroe, 8, and her brother, Sean, 7, were playing in a chest that could not be opened from the inside, leaving them to suffocate.

MBTA nears antibias agreement with US regulators

The MBTA has a long history of discrimination complaints filed against it by both minority and women employees.

By Todd Wallack

The MBTA has a long history of discrimination complaints filed against it by both minority and women employees.

From ancient fish, insight into origin of limbs

Harvard’s Farish Jenkins died in 2012, before research he helped conduct was published.

By Carolyn Y. Johnson

New research suggests that we can trace our arms — and our legs — to the fins of a 375-million-year-old fish.

More Stories

Patrick backs DCF in custody case

By Travis Andersen and Michael Levenson

Crash on Pike leaves 5 injured

By Catalina Gaitan

Business

Mass. to give $50m for storm, flood protection

By Erin Ailworth

Most of the money will be distributed help cities and towns install backup power systems using clean technologies.

Partners promises a new model for health care

“It may be a little more interesting and a little more dynamic than elsewhere because the government has intervened for an extended period of time,” said Partners CEO Gary Gottlieb on the Massachusetts market.

By Robert Weisman

Partners HealthCare System’s top executives said further expansion in Eastern Mass. will lower costs and improve medical care.

Venture capital firms booming in Mass.

By Michael B. Farrell

The state’s venture capital firms raised $5.4 billion for new investments last year, more than triple the 2012 figure.

Obituaries

Robert H. Quinn, 85, former attorney general, legislator

Mr. Quinn testified in 1973.

By J.M. Lawrence

Mr. Quinn’s name is synonymous with the program that offers bigger paychecks to Mass. police officers who earn college degrees.

Madeline Arakawa Gins, 72; visionary architect sought eternal living

The Bioscleave House (Lifespan Extending Villa) on Long Island was designed by Ms. Gins and her husband.

By Margalit Fox

Ms. Gins, a poet-turned-painter-turned-architect, designed buildings which, by her own account, were designed to preempt death for those living in them.

Sports

Rockets 104, Celtics 92

Celtics’ losing streak hits 9 games

The frustration shows on the face of Jared Sullinger as the Celtics are about to lose for the ninth straight time.

By Baxter Holmes

The Celtics were flat in their return home, and the Rockets sent them into their longest losing streak since the 2006-07 season.

Syracuse 69, BC 59

BC can’t take down No. 2 Syracuse

Syracuse’s Baye Moussa Keita (right) and Jerami Grant put the squeeze on BC’s Olivier Hanlan during a second-half run.

By Michael Vega

The Eagles came up short in their attempt to stack another solid effort on top of last Saturday’s first conference win of the season at Virginia Tech.

Patriots OK with being underdogs against Broncos

While it may be a stretch to say other teams have counted Bill Belichick and the Patriots out, they certainly have had their share of doubters.

By Shalise Manza Young

The early buzz — and the early line in Vegas — has the Broncos favored in the AFC Championship game, for a variety of reasons.

G: Living

bookish | matthew gilbert

Self-help books and the promise of change

Interest in self-help books, like the titles above, typically spikes around January, as people make New Year’s resolutions and want motivation to keep them.

By Matthew Gilbert

Plenty of books can help you with your January resolution, but it’s still up to you to make the change you envision.

Stage Review

Stirring ‘Color Purple’ from SpeakEasy Stage Company

Lovely Hoffman (left) as Celie and Crystin Gilmore as Shug Avery in “The Color Purple.”

By Don Aucoin

“The Color Purple’’ taps into the enduring power of Alice Walker’s story, and adds up to a strong production.

Book Review

‘The Death Class’ by Erika Hayasaki

By Nick Romeo

A former reporter at the Los Angeles Times, Hayasaki became interested in responses to death after covering the fatal mass shootings at Virginia Tech.

More Stories

Music Review

With Denk, disparate ideas find common ground

By Matthew Guerrieri

ALBUM REVIEW | AMERICANA

Rosanne Cash, ‘The River and the Thread’

By James Reed

Album review | COUNTRY

Jennifer Nettles, ‘That Girl’

By Sarah Rodman

ALBUM REVIEW | ROCK

Bruce Springsteen, ‘High Hopes’

By Steve Morse

ALBUM REVIEW | HIP-HOP

Kid Ink, ‘My Own Lane’

By Ken Capobianco

Movie Stars

Movie capsules

Events

Boston-area to do list

By June Wulff

Names

Globe reporters are book award finalists

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

Stars of ‘Wicked Tuna’ surprised by their fans

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

After Subway Ride, a party without pants

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

Boston well represented at Golden Globes

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

Abby Chin talks off-limit relationships

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

Nicholas Martin replaced as ‘Seagull’ director

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

Joyce Linehan’s ‘Soup’ party draws (bigger) crowd

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein