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Ivan Vaclavik, who came to the US in 1974 for a three-week visit and never left, was present in Brighton District Court in December 2012 for a restraining order hearing.

Criminal without a country finally deported

After decades of failed attempts, US officials have sent the mysterious emigre Ivan Vaclavik to the Czech Republic.

State Representative Carlos Henriquez has defied calls to step down following his conviction for assault.

Wendy Maeda/Globe Staff

Carlos Henriquez returns to the State House in handcuffs

The appearance was required to expel Henriquez, a newly minted inmate in the Middlesex County House of Correction, from the state House.

Curb on seniors’ drugs protested

Proposed Obama administration limits to the array of antidepressants and other drugs available to seniors set off an intense round of lobbying.

Evaluations reveal skepticism of rail incumbent’s improvements

The MBTA wanted a fresh start by giving the commuter rail contract to Keolis Commuter Services, not Massachusetts Bay Commuter Railroad.

Dedicated fitness buffs powered through a spin class at Flywheel Sports, which is among the specialized studios thundering into Boston.

Indoor cycling studios are spinning exercise into gold

Years after the spinning craze took hold in New York and Los Angeles, the two biggest spinning chains in the country are here.

The Nation

Curb on seniors’ drugs protested

Representative Tim Murphy sponsored a bill that would ensure patients continue to have full access.

By Tracy Jan

Proposed Obama administration limits to the array of antidepressants and other drugs available to seniors set off an intense round of lobbying.

GOP shortens timeframe for nomination

RNC chief Reince Priebus said the changes wouldn’t allow Republicans to ‘‘slice and dice’’ each other for six months.

By Steve Peoples

Republican leaders overwhelmingly voted to shorten their presidential selection process to minimize damage from GOP candidates attacking each other.

Judge orders life support for pregnant woman removed

 Erick Munoz left court Friday with his lawyer and his mother-in-law after a judge ordered a Fort Worth hospital to remove life support for his pregnant, brain-dead wife, Marlise Munoz.

By Nomaan Merchant

A judge ordered a Texas hospital to remove life support for a pregnant, brain-dead woman whose family said she would not want to be kept in that condition.

The World

Bombings, clashes leave 10 more dead in Egypt

The Islamic Art Museum was damaged by a bomb attack in downtown Cairo Friday.

By Abigail Hauslohner and Erin Cunningham

A string of explosions struck several security targets in the Egyptian capital.

Breakdown averted in Syrian talks as sides agree to meet

Activists protested at the United Nations office in Geneva where meetings were being held.

By Anne Barnard

The participants in the Syrian peace conference averted a collapse in the talks, agreeing to meet in the same room Saturday for the first time.

US committed to engagement in Middle East, Kerry says

By Matthew Lee

Secretary of State John Kerry hit back at criticism that the Obama administration’s Middle East policy is in disarray.

Editorial & Opinion

Opinion | Linda Bilmes

UN funding is a small price for peace

Malian soldiers react to an explosion in the city of Gao in February. The UN has deployed 6,000 peacekeepers to Mali.

By Linda Bilmes

US appetite for foreign interventions is low, but there is one thing we can do to help restore some of our battered moral leadership in world affairs.

Derrick Z. Jackson

Investors see green in clean energy

In the last two years, Bank of America, Goldman Sachs, Wells Fargo, and Morgan Stanley have announced goals to finance and invest in renewable energy projects.

By Derrick Z. Jackson

Big bankers and insurance companies are calling for massive investments in clean energy lest they pay in massive damages from climate change.

Opinion | Stephen E. Sallan

Sick kids need faster drug testing

By Stephen E. Sallan

The way we bring new pediatric drugs to market does not always serve the best interests of children with life-threatening illness.

Metro

Evaluations reveal skepticism of rail incumbent’s improvements

MBTA General Manager Beverly Scott said the appeal of Keolis Commuter Services’s lower bid was bolstered by the good rating evaluators awarded its proposal, versus the merely acceptable rating garnered by MBCR.

By Martine Powers

The MBTA wanted a fresh start by giving the commuter rail contract to Keolis Commuter Services, not Massachusetts Bay Commuter Railroad.

Criminal without a country finally deported

Ivan Vaclavik, who came to the US in 1974 for a three-week visit and never left, was present in Brighton District Court in December 2012 for a restraining order hearing.

By Maria Sacchetti

After decades of failed attempts, US officials have sent the mysterious emigre Ivan Vaclavik to the Czech Republic.

Indoor cycling studios are spinning exercise into gold

Dedicated fitness buffs powered through a spin class at Flywheel Sports, which is among the specialized studios thundering into Boston.

By Christopher Muther

Years after the spinning craze took hold in New York and Los Angeles, the two biggest spinning chains in the country are here.

More Stories

Carlos Henriquez returns to the State House in handcuffs

By Michael Levenson and Jim O’Sullivan

Tufts graduate, 24, dies in Thailand

By Matt Rocheleau and Jennifer Smith

Business

Care.com soars in first day of trading

Care.com CEO Sheila Lirio Marcelo embraced a colleague at the firm’s initial public offering on the New York Stock Exchange.

By Hiawatha Bray

The online marketplace for personal care services rose nearly 43 percent to close at $24.30 on the NYSE.

Bankrupt Building 19 reinvents itself as a rug store

Bill Elovitz said he began buying rugs because it let him “deal with beautiful things.”

By Colman M. Herman

The Rug Department will hold a soft opening Saturday at a former Building 19 location in Norwood.

MBTA retirement fund sues auditor over $25m loss

By Beth Healy

The MBTA lost $25 million it invested in a fund recommended by a former director, who who worked at the firm.

Obituaries

Douglas Davis, 80; critic and Internet artist

By Daniel E. Slotnik

Mr. Davis’s art work explored the possibilities of video and the Internet as creative and interactive mediums.

John Dobson, 98; inspired stargazing, built telescopes

By Douglas Martin

Mr. Dobson is credited with developing the first, high-powered, portable telescope that amateur astronomers could build inexpensively.

Leslie Lee, playwright of black life; at 83

By Bruce Weber

Mr. Lee’s award-winning work focused on stretching the boundaries of the African-American experience as it was portrayed on the stage.

Sports

Thunder 101, Celtics 83

Minus Kevin Durant, Thunder roll

Celtics forward Jeff Green threw down a dunk during the second quarter.

By Baxter Holmes

The league’s leading scorer (31 points per game) sat out with an injury, nonetheless the Celtics fell short.

Australian Open

Bostonian Eric Butorac rises up in doubles down under

Eric Butorac (left), who lives in Boston and coaches at Harvard, reached the doubles final with partner Raven Klaasen.

By Howard Axelrod

The 32-year-old journeyman, a volunteer coach for the Harvard men’s tennis team, reached the men’s doubles finals at the year’s first Grand Slam.

Patriots’ Nick Caserio interviews for Dolphins’ GM job

Nick Caserio has been with the Patriots since 2001.

By Shalise Manza Young

Caserio, 38, who has been the Patriots’ director of player personnel for six years, is the eighth candidate to interview with Miami.

G: Family

A Falmouth veteran battles wind turbines — and health woes

Barry Funfar on the deck of his home, near the turbines.

By Bella English

A Vietnam veteran says the Falmouth turbines have worsened his PTSD and brought other ills, adding to the dispute over the technology.

From the Archives

Skating in New England

By Leanne Burden

With the Winter Olympics just two weeks away, looking back at one of New England’s favorite pastimes seemed appropriate.

Grit and grace with the band Sleepy Kitty

“There’s something fascinating about a two-piece, because there really just aren’t enough people to do all the parts,” says drummer Evan Sult (above right, with guitarist and vocalist Paige Brubeck).

By Jeremy D. Goodwin

The duo’s chugging drums and crunchy guitars are sweetened by catchy melodies and vocal harmonies that summon memories of 1960s-era girl groups.