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Pat Greenhouse/Globe Staff

The minister goes where the need is

From church to shelter to jail to graveside, the Rev. Laura Buchanan Ahart of United Baptist Church follows her midlife calling.

Matthew Barrett, right, and his husband Ed Suplee.

Gay married man says Catholic school rescinded job offer

Matthew Barrett of Dorchester said Fontbonne Academy in Milton withdrew a job offer within two days after he listed his husband as emergency contact.

In N.H., GOP weary of waiting for Scott Brown

Republicans across New Hampshire have a message for Brown: if he’s running for US Senate, he should get his truck in gear.

In preliminary research, Brigham and Women’s scientists believe they have reprogrammed human cells to become stem cells, seen here through the microscope.

Scientists discover a new, simpler way to make stem cells

The discovery of an unexpected way to create the cells is being called “shocking” and “revolutionary.”

Boston Athletic Association officials consulted with Adidas on the colors and design of the 2014 Celebration Jacket for this year’s Boston Marathon participants.

’14 Marathon apparel draws mixed early reviews

The fluorescent orange 2014 Celebration Jacket includes an embroidered BAA logo with the words “Boston Runs as One.”

The Nation

Snow, ice send Atlanta reeling

A teacher covered children at E. Rivers Elementary School’s  gym in Atlanta. Thousands of students were stranded.

By David Crary and Ray Henry

Icy weather wreaked similar havoc across much of the South, closing schools and highways, grounding flights, and contributing to at least a dozen deaths.

Cruise ship passengers recall days of misery

By Samantha Henry

Passengers aboard a cruise ship on which hundreds fell ill recalled being holed up in their rooms before the journey was cut short and it returned to its home port.

Farm measure OK’d by House

By Ron Nixon

The bill, which authorizes spending on farm subsidies and nutrition programs, has been stalled for two years.

The World

Syrian official says vote may be postponed

By Zeina Karam

The comments by an adviser to President Assad came as a UN mediator said the gap in talks between the government and the opposition is ‘‘quite large.’’

Ukraine lawmakers offer protester amnesty

Both opposition leaders and protesters in Kiev’s central Independence Square rejected the measure. “Parliament has just passed a law on hostages,” one leader said.

By Yuras Karmanau

Ukraine’s parliament offered amnesty to those arrested, but only if demonstrators vacate most of the buildings they occupy.

Pakistani leader urges peace talks with Taliban

By Munir Ahmed

Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif also called on the militants to observe a cease-fire and condemned them for targeting security forces and civilians.

Editorial & Opinion

NICHOLAS BURNS

The new American isolationism

By Nicholas Burns

Many Americans say the US should focus on domestic affairs, but that’s a recipe for foreign policy failure in today’s highly integrated world.

JOAN VENNOCHI

Patrick’s charisma hides real issues

Governor Patrick delivered his eighth State of the Commonwealth speech Tuesday.

By Joan Vennochi

Deval Patrick is eloquent and persuasive, but the details of government require more than verbal finery.

alex Beam

Did Mormons want Romney to win?

Mitt Romney on election night, in “Mitt.”

By Alex Beam

Mitt Romney’s emergence onto the national scene may have been too much too fast for the Mormon Church.

Metro

Scientists discover a new, simpler way to make stem cells

In preliminary research, Brigham and Women’s scientists believe they have reprogrammed human cells to become stem cells, seen here through the microscope.

By Carolyn Y. Johnson

The discovery of an unexpected way to create the cells is being called “shocking” and “revolutionary.”

In N.H., GOP weary of waiting for Scott Brown

Scott Brown (left) moved to Rye, N.H., a year after losing his US Senate seat. Many suspected he would seek office there.

By Joshua Miller

Republicans across New Hampshire have a message for Brown: if he’s running for US Senate, he should get his truck in gear.

Gay married man says Catholic school rescinded job offer

Matthew Barrett, right, and his husband Ed Suplee.

By Milton J. Valencia

Matthew Barrett of Dorchester said Fontbonne Academy in Milton withdrew a job offer within two days after he listed his husband as emergency contact.

More Stories

RMV fees may rise 10 percent

By Martine Powers

YVONNE ABRAHAM

Public and private grief

By Yvonne Abraham

Google selling its mobility unit to Lenovo for about $3 billion

By DAVID GELLES, CLAIRE CAIN MILLER and QUENTIN HARDY

Business

Fenway Center developer asks for $7.8m tax break

A westside view of the $500 million, mixed-use Fenway Center development.

By Casey Ross

Though his previous request was rebuffed by former mayor Menino, the developer’s new application to Mayor Walsh is getting a warmer reception.

Walsh eyes regional approach on biotech

Mayor  Walsh spoke at a MassBio event.

By Robert Weisman

Boston Mayor Martin Walsh’s tone contrasted with that of his predecessor, Thomas Menino, known for his aggressive Boston-first posture.

Where are Mass. home sales going in 2014?

The condominium market also had a good year in 2013, particularly luxury condos in downtown Boston.

By Deirdre Fernandes

Higher mortgage rates and lower numbers of homes up for sale could put a damper on sales.

Obituaries

Elaine Espindle, 65; superintendent in Peabody, Dracut

Elaine Espindle was school superintendent in Peabody and Dracut.

By Laurie D. Willis

Colleagues described Mrs. Espindle as passionate about education, tenacious, and focused on what was best for the students.

Sports

76ers 95, celtics 94

Celtics lose to 76ers on buzzer-beater

Jared Sullinger, Jerryd Bayless, and Chris Johnson were dejected after the buzzer-beater.

By Baxter Holmes

The Celtics lost their 19th game in the past 22 and fell to the bottom of the Atlantic Division.

Dan Shaughnessy

Why does Bill Belichick hate Wes Welker?

Wes Welker is headed to his third Super Bowl, this time with the Broncos.

By Dan Shaughnessy

“That’s a question for him,” said Welker, who declined to comment on Belichick’s harsh criticism of him last week.

On basketball

Celtics-76ers rivalry not what it used to be

Larry Bird kept the ball away from 76ers guard Lionel Hollins during a 1980 game.

By Gary Washburn

The old rivalry is on hiatus as both organizations hopes to land a franchise-changing first-round pick in June.

G: Style

How Andrew Ritzer became concierge to the city’s concierges

Andrew Ritzer improves the Boston hospitality experience one relationship at a time.

By James H. Burnett III

In the city's hospitality world, the one-man operation behind International Concierge Associates helps concierges and businesses keep guests happy.

stage review

‘The Whipping Man’ explores legacy of slavery

From left: Jesse Hinson plays a wounded Confederate soldier; Johnny Lee Davenport and Keith Mascoll play his former slaves.

By Don Aucoin

The New Repertory Theatre production touches on the parallels between the enslavement of the Israelites in Egypt and that of African-Americans in the US.

Nelsons and BSO on Carnegie Hall schedule

Andris Nelsons and the BSO (pictured in 2011) will play three Carnegie Hall programs in April 2015.

By Jeremy Eichler

The Boston Symphony Orchestra will perform three programs next season at Carnegie Hall under the baton of its incoming music director, Andris Nelsons.

More Stories

book review

‘Before We Met’ by Lucie Whitehouse

By Daneet Steffens

Bargain Bin

Coolidge CrossFit offers a deal

By Ami Albernaz

Ask Martha

Matching grout color with white tiles

By Martha Stewar

Mark your calendar

By June Wulff

events

Boston-area to do list

By Milva DiDomizio

Handyman on Call

Roof ridge vs. side vents

By Peter Hotton

An Australia Day celebration at the Boston Harbor Hotel

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

‘Whitey’ director wants more answers about FBI involvement

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

The Bath Magazine will reprint cover

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

Seth Meyers gets his pickle

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

Newton’s Sam Donovan impresses on ‘Project Runway’

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

Billy Joel to play Fenway Park?

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Globe North

More housing needed to spur growth, study says

By Matt Carroll

Competing visions of Greater Boston’s future growth were laid out in a report released this month by the Metropolitan Area Planning Council.

Students at Acera School in Winchester tackle world issues

Students at Winchester’s Acera School study the issues of their assigned countries to prepare for this weekend’s Model UN Conference.

By Taryn Plumb

Students will get the opportunity to display their knowledge of civics, diplomacy, and debate at the Boston University Academy Model UN Conference.

Winchester students ask the world: ‘Show me your school’

Olivia Valcourt  photographs (from left) Lila Griffin, Mya Salyards, Mia Legere, and Isabella Greene, while Brady (bottom photo, left) and Ryan Martin play soccer.

By Taryn Plumb

“Show me your school” encourages students to document their day-to-day activities and share it with other children through photography.

Globe South

More housing needed to spur growth, study says

By Matt Carroll

Competing visions of Greater Boston’s future growth were laid out in a report released this month by the Metropolitan Area Planning Council.

At Bridgewater-Raynham, students tackle a brewing trash dilemma

Bridgewater-Raynham Regional High seniors Alyssa Battles and Andrew Zucker are part of a team work-ing to perfect a prototype (below) that separates a K-Cup coffee pod into its recyclable components.

By Jennette Barnes

A group of high school students are competing for a grant to come up with a solution to the waste produced by single-serving coffee pods.

Local officials scramble to write bylaws on pot dispensaries

A researcher said a common town  strategy on zoning is “wait and see who blinks first.”

By Cara Bayles

With the one-year moratorium on medical marijuana dispensaries set to expire in many south suburbs, communities are scrambling to zone for sites.

Globe West

Arlington

Arlington organizations protest new town fees

By Emily Cataneo

A number of groups are protesting a new town policy to charge fees for meeting in town-owned buildings.

Six decades later, Beanpot memories still served up

Bud Purcell, 83, Walt Greeley, 82, Joe Morgan, 83, Jim Campion, 82, and Dick Rodenhiser, 81, (left to right) gather regularly to share memories of their days as pioneers in the first Beanpot Tournament.

By Lenny Megliola

Several players who took part in the first Beanpot Tournament in 1952 have an annual tradition to meet up and rehash the good old days.

Through art, daughter confronts family’s past demons

Works on display in “Blood Memory” by artist Lisa Rosowsky include a hand-stitched garment the artist made to fit herself.

By Steve Maas

In an exhibition at Brandeis University in Waltham, Lisa Rosowsky explores family and loss from the viewpoint of a child of the Holocaust generation.