Front page

Medical marijuana shops could open by summer

The state’s first dispensaries are spread across 10 of the state’s 14 counties, located from Boston to Dennis.

In response to disenchanted restaurant chefs and owners, the Greater Boston Convention & Visitors Bureau — which runs the event — said there will be a range of prices for Dine Out Boston.

Globe staff/file 2005

A different course for struggling Restaurant Week

Organizers hope to whet appetites by rebranding it as Dine Out Boston and addressing the one-price-fits-all rule.

State Representative Carlos Henriquez (right) was led into an elevator after appearing Tuesday before the House Committe on Ethics at the State House.

Images of Carlos Henriquez stir Boston’s black community

Henriquez’s conviction by an all-white jury, his immediate imprisonment, and the push by mostly white House leaders are feeding a deep distrust in his district.

Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev.

Tsarnaev defense team may favor Boston trial

Strong opposition to the death penalty here could benefit Dzhokhar Tsarnaev when his case goes before a jury.

Esther Earl, who needed oxygen as she grew sicker, has inspired another book, this one  told through her own words.

Esther Earl, Quincy teen, is inspiration for two books

Esther became an Internet celebrity as she blogged about life with pediatric thyroid cancer before dying in 2010.

The Nation

Keystone XL pipeline clears significant hurdle

Crews worked in 2012 on construction of the Keystone XL pipeline near Winona, Texas.

By Coral Davenport

The State Department released a report that could pave the way toward President Obama’s approval.

Lawyer implies Christie knew more

David Wildstein, who oversaw the lane closings, testified at the State House last month.

By Kate Zernike

A lawyer for a former official wrote that “evidence exists” that Gov. Chris Christie knew of the New Jersey lane closures when they happened.

Obama says he may accept immigration deal with GOP

By Peter Baker

President Obama signaled in an interview that he might accept a deal that does not include a special path to citizenship.

The World

Peace talks on Syria end with no headway

“The gaps between the sides remain wide; there is no use pretending otherwise,” said the UN mediator, Lakhdar Brahimi.

By Nick Cumming-Bruce

“We haven’t made any progress to speak of,” the UN mediator, Lakhdar Brahimi, said after a final round of talks.

Ukraine protest leader says he was tortured

By Maria Danilova

The bloody images of Dmytro Bulatov have fueled fears that extrajudicial squads are being deployed to intimidate the protest movement.

Amanda Knox codefendant went to Austria briefly

“I will never go willingly back to the place. . . .  It’s not right,” Amanda Knox said of Italy.

By Colleen Barry and Nicole Winfield

Raffaele Sollecito’s travels were revealed on the same day that Knox made clear she would never voluntarily return to Italy.

Editorial & Opinion

RENÉE LOTH

A flood of trouble

Turner Road in Scituate flooded after a February 2013 storm.

By Renée Loth

Having the government underwrite the status quo obscures the real costs of climate change.

Derrick Z. Jackson

Cheer for an NCAA athletes’ union

By Derrick Z. Jackson

Northwestern University’s football team, aided by the United Steelworkers, have filed for union recognition.

opinion | Daniel S. Medwed

Tsarnaev decision increases incentive for plea deal

Prosecutors will seek the death penalty for Dzhokhar Tsarnaev.

By Daniel S. Medwed

Seeking the death penalty against Dzhokhar Tsarnaev may produce an outcome that advances the strategic interests of both sides.

Metro

Tsarnaev defense team may favor Boston trial

Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev.

By Milton J. Valencia and Anush Elbakyan

Strong opposition to the death penalty here could benefit Dzhokhar Tsarnaev when his case goes before a jury.

Images of Carlos Henriquez stir Boston’s black community

State Representative Carlos Henriquez (right) was led into an elevator after appearing Tuesday before the House Committe on Ethics at the State House.

By Meghan E. Irons

Henriquez’s conviction by an all-white jury, his immediate imprisonment, and the push by mostly white House leaders are feeding a deep distrust in his district.

Esther Earl, Quincy teen, is inspiration for two books

Esther Earl, who needed oxygen as she grew sicker, has inspired another book, this one  told through her own words.

By Meredith Goldstein

Esther became an Internet celebrity as she blogged about life with pediatric thyroid cancer before dying in 2010.

More Stories

Medical marijuana shops could open by summer

By Kay Lazar and and Jaclyn Reiss

Hernandez phone call tapes sought by DA

By Wesley Lowery and John Ellement

star watch

Students stumble on a supernova

By Alan M. MacRobert

NEW HAVEN

Conn. prisoner wins jury verdict over mattress

By JOHN CHRISTOFFERSEN

BOSTON

Man found stabbed at Roslindale complex

By Jacqueline Tempera

Business

Insuring a vehicle costs more during winter

Joseph Murphy is the state insurance commissioner.

By Deirdre Fernandes

A yearlong study found that drivers can spend as much as 20 percent more if they purchase policies in March instead of in the summer.

Private jet business soars for the Super Bowl

Greg Raiff, CEO of Private Jet Services, has a business boom as riders head to NFL’s big game.

By Katie Johnston

Wealthy individuals and corporate heavy hitters are pulling out the stops to see and be seen at the year’s most buzzed-about sporting event.

Mass. residents losing jobless benefits

By Sean Lavery

Nearly 3,000 living here have exhausted unemployment benefits since the end of the year, and hundreds more are losing them each week.

Obituaries

John R. Huizenga, 92; physicist at fore of nuclear era

Mr. Huizenga in the early 1940s, in Oak Ridge, Tenn., where teams analyzed the purity of enriched uranium.

By William J. Broad

Mr. Huizenga helped build the world’s first atom bomb and solve dozens of atomic riddles.

Anna Gordy Gaye, 92; sister of Berry Gordy, ex-wife of Marvin Gaye

Ms. Gordy Gaye co-wrote two songs on “What’s Going On.”

By Jeff Karoub

Ms. Gordy Gaye helped write some of her then-husband’s songs and had a Motown Records subsidiary named after her.

Morrie Turner, 90; pioneering ‘Wee Pals’ cartoonist

Morrie Turner, shown at work in his studio, was one of the first mainstream black cartoonists. He died a week ago.

By Adam Bernstein

Mr. Turner, one of the first mainstream black cartoonists, created the strip in 1965.

Sports

Roger Goodell talks Dolphins scandal, Super Bowl weather

A pleased Roger Goodell warmed right up talking about the Super Bowl. “We will kick off at 6:30 Sunday night,’’ he said.

By Ben Volin

The NFL commissioner addressed several topics at his annual “State of the League” press conference.

Dan Shaughnessy

Pete Carroll was always up to the NFL challenge

Pete Carroll, at 62, is in his first Super Bowl in his third stop as an NFL head coach.

By Dan Shaughnessy

Fifteen years after he was fired by Bob Kraft and unfairly labeled an NFL failure, Carroll took the Seahawks to the Super Bowl.

Super Bowl XLVIII

Broncos coach John Fox is happy and healthy again

Linebacker Wesley Woodyard (52) and the Broncos are in good condition with coach John Fox recovering fully — and quickly — from his heart procedure in November.

By Shalise Manza Young

Fox minimizes the severity of his situation now, even though aortic valve replacement surgery caused him to miss four games on the sidelines.

G: Family

Fighting for a comeback

Six-year-old Andrew Honohan tries out the speed bag at one of Peter Welch’s gyms in South Boston.

By James Sullivan

With his South Boston gym featured in a new TV series, Peter Welch sees an opening to pay it forward by introducing kids to the sport.

From the Archives

New England ice harvesting

By Thea Breite and Lisa Tuite

Ice harvesting, once a thriving business, is now recreated at winter ice festivals around New England.

Stage Review

Bread & Puppet walks the audience through a shattered world

One of the imaginative papier mâché puppets in Bread & Puppet Theater’s “The Shatterer of Worlds.”

By Terry Byrne

In “The Shatterer of Worlds,” Peter Schumann takes on humanity’s obsession with death and destruction.