Front page

Donor’s death shatters family, stuns surgeons

Generosity drove Paul Hawks to donate part of his liver to his brother-in-law. Then disaster struck, and transplant medicine has had to rethink its rules.

Martin J. Walsh says his condo could fit into the second-floor parlor of the city-owned Parkman House on Beacon Hill.

LANE TURNER/GLOBE STAFF

Boston is now Martin Walsh’s neighborhood

Walsh is finding that being mayor is a blur of decisions, distractions, and demands, but also a chance to put his mark on this old town.

Russian President Vladimir Putin has put much of his personal prestige on the line with the Sochi games.

At Putin’s Olympics, turmoil outruns the torch

Instead of basking in appreciation for achieving his Olympic goals, Russian President Vladimir Putin is on the defensive.

Savage toll of abuse for children in DCF care

State records show that children under the watch of the Department of Children and Families die with alarming regularity.

Dr. Charles Vacanti was an outsider to the world of stem cells.

YOON S. BYUN/GLOBE STAFF

Ignorance led to invention of stem cell technique

Dr. Charles Vacanti’s discovery is a reminder that as specialized as science is, sometimes, a little ignorance may be a virtue.

The Nation

Fla. state chemist faces inquiry over evidence thefts

By Brendan Farrington

In dozens of drug cases, prescription pain pills were swapped out with over-the-counter pills.

Drought in the West emptying reservoirs

By Adam Nagourney

Authorities are dealing with the worst water shortage the region has faced in more than a century.

More states granting in-state tuition to immigrants

New Jersey Governor Chris Christie shakes students’ hands after a ceremonial signing of the DREAM Act last month.

By Kimberly Hefling

The statutes allow students who came to the US when they were minors to pay in-state tuition.

More Stories

Fraternity deaths put scrutiny on safety

By David Glovin and John Hechinger

The World

Trial of Egypt’s ousted leader resumes amid protests

A vehicle transporting a lawyer in the Morsi case was surrounded Saturday in Cairo by both protesters and journalists.

By Hamza Hendawi

A lawyer for Egypt’s ousted president told a Cairo court that it lacked jurisdiction to try Mohammed Morsi.

14 die as Indonesian volcano erupts again

By Binsar Bakkara

A volcano that has been rumbling for months unleashed a major eruption Saturday.

Syrian forces renew strikes in Aleppo

Fighters with the Free Syrian Army watched from the frontline in the Karam Tarrad neighborhood of Aleppo as smoke rose during an attack on Saturday.

By Diaa Hadid

Military helicopters dropped barrels packed with explosives in the government’s latest air raids on rebel-held areas of Aleppo.

Editorial & Opinion

JEFF JACOBY

‘Leading from behind’ eventually leads nowhere

US Secretary of State John Kerry looked out at the Swiss Alps during a helicopter ride from Davos to Zurich Jan. 25.

By Jeff Jacoby

A more modest and deferential America has become a less respected America.

JOAN VENNOCHI

Release full report on Jared Remy case

By Joan Vennochi

The Middlesex district attorney’s office has released only the executive summary of an independent review in the case.

TOM KEANE

The political benefit of minimum wage hike

By Tom Keane

Economists endlessly debate the point, but much data suggest past rises haven’t significantly hurt jobs.

More Stories

opinion | Jay Atkinson

The invisible professor

By Jay Atkinson

opinion | Phillip Niemeyer

Charting the 48 Super Bowls

letters | verdicts on health care reform

At last, a positive take on health care reform

letters | verdicts on health care reform

Rosy view can’t hide Obamacare’s flaws

letters | two Boston schools face staff exodus

Clean sweep of staff will raise stress, not test scores

letters | two Boston schools face staff exodus

Disruption at Dever would fly in the face of school community’s wishes

Metro

Savage toll of abuse for children in DCF care

Top, from left: Dontel Jeffers, 4, died in 2005; Rebecca Riley, 4, of Hull died in 2006. Bottom, from left: Jeremiah Oliver, 5, has been missing since Sept. 14 and is now feared dead; Acia Johnson, 14, and her sister Sophia, 3, died in 2008. Their cases were overseen by state workers.

By Jenifer McKim

State records show that children under the watch of the Department of Children and Families die with alarming regularity.

Ignorance led to invention of stem cell technique

Dr. Charles Vacanti was an outsider to the world of stem cells.

By Carolyn Y. Johnson

Dr. Charles Vacanti’s discovery is a reminder that as specialized as science is, sometimes, a little ignorance may be a virtue.

Donor’s death shatters family, stuns surgeons

Tim Wilson (left) had both end-stage liver disease and liver cancer. Paul Hawks (right) was 56 at the time of the liver transplant at Lahey Clinic.

By Liz Kowalczyk

Generosity drove Paul Hawks to donate part of his liver to his brother-in-law. Then disaster struck, and transplant medicine has had to rethink its rules.

Money & Careers

Innovation Economy

Making better use of parcel in Kendall Square

In December, a City of Cambridge planning study proposed several possibilities for future development of the Volpe Center site.

By Scott Kirsner

As Kendall Square has grown, it has become obvious that the sprawling Volpe Center campus is a void at the heart of it.

Mutual Funds

Unconstrained bond funds have been a hit

By Stan Choe

Analysts say conditions will remain tough for bonds, but the industry says these funds can better withstand the challenges.

What to do with 15 acres in Kendall Square?

From left: Dennis Frenchman, an architect and city planner; Dan Nowiszewski (a.k.a. Nova)  a general partner with Highland Capital Partners;  Bill Jacobson, the chief executive of Workbar; and Abby Fichtner, hacker-in-residence at Harvard Innovation Lab.

What could you do with the land? The Globe asked a city planner, a venture capitalist, an entrepreneur, and a hacker for their ideas.

More Stories

Home of the week

Stoneham ranch reinvented as a Colonial

By John R. Ellement

HANDYMAN ON CALL | Peter Hotton

Can a do-it-yourselfer replaster a ceiling?

By Peter Hotton

Real Estate now | SCOTT VAN VOORHIS

Will millennials kill home ownership?

By Scott Van Voorhis

On the Job

Photo conservator sees the big picture

By Cindy Atoji Keene

Etiquette at Work

Applicants must pay attention to the details

By Peter Post

Job Doc

Finding a tech job without a recruiter’s help

By Patricia Hunt Sinacole

Mass. Movers

EMC will cut more jobs in restructuring

By Michael B. Farrell

Sports

Bruins 4, Oilers 0

Bruins top Oilers, get back on track

As a reward, goalie Chad Johnson is greeted by a line of happy Bruins.

By Amalie Benjamin

The 4-0 win was a nice way for the Bruins to bounce back after a difficult loss to the Canadiens on Thursday.

At Putin’s Olympics, turmoil outruns the torch

Russian President Vladimir Putin has put much of his personal prestige on the line with the Sochi games.

By David Filipov

Instead of basking in appreciation for achieving his Olympic goals, Russian President Vladimir Putin is on the defensive.

Dan Shaughnessy

Hype weathered, now it’s game time

By Dan Shaughnessy

This is the Super Bowl in which Al Roker has been more important than Al Michaels or Terry Bradshaw.

More Stories

Leigh Montville

Tier pricing doesn’t go far enough

By Leigh Montville

On Second Thought

Pinball is enjoying a revival in the US

By Kevin Paul Dupont

Sunday Baseball Notes

Catching up on hot topics with David Ross

By Nick Cafardo

Sunday Football Notes

Broncos’ John Elway still driven by competition

By Ben Volin

Sunday Hockey Notes

John Madden jumps from ice to bench

By Fluto Shinzawa

Sunday Basketball Notes

Antoine Walker believes it’s time to share his experiences

By Gary Washburn

Super Bowl XLVIII

Keys to victory for Broncos, Seahawks

By Jim McBride

BRUINS NOTEBOOK

Oilers’ Andrew Ference honored in return

By Amalie Benjamin

Notre Dame 76, BC 73 | OT

BC sunk by Notre Dame

By Michael Vega

St. Joseph’s 73, UMass 68

UMass comes up short

By Michael Whitmer

Harvard 80, Penn 50

Harvard blasts Penn, holds down Ivy lead

By Julian Benbow

Ideas

Boston’s black-market cigarette problem

By Kevin Hartnett

A new report suggests smuggling is rampant — and we may have well-intentioned policies to blame.

Sorry, dolphins aren’t uniquely intelligent

By Emily Anthes

The trouble with believing in the special smarts of one charming animal.

A mob initiation, in secret code

-

By Diego Gambetta

An insider’s guide to the mysterious document found in Rome.

More Stories

Why Russians love biathlon

By William D. Frank

Uncommon Knowledge

A cure for nuclear proliferation backfires

By Kevin Lewis

Brainiac

An expert’s guide to bar fights

By Kevin Hartnett

Obituaries

Boris Magasanik, 94; pioneer in molecular biology at MIT

Leaders at MIT credited Dr. Magasanik with helping establish the institute as top-notch in biology.

By J.M. Lawrence

Mr. Magasanik made key discoveries and spent 50 years teaching generations of students about the secrets of tiny cells.

Maximilian Schell, 83; won Oscar for ‘Judgment at Nuremberg’

Maximilian Schellwon an Oscar for his role as a defense lawyer in ‘‘Judgment at Nuremberg,’’ Below, the actor posed in 2002 in front of Gluecksburg Castle in Germany.

The Austrian-born actor was a fugitive from Adolf Hitler who later became a Hollywood favorite.

Richard L. Grossman, 92; publisher of Ralph Nader’s ‘Unsafe at Any Speed’

Mr. Grossman rushed Ralph Nader’s ‘‘Unsafe at Any Speed’’ to publication within two months.

By Adam Bernstein

Mr. Grossman, an independent New York publisher of political affairs and photography books, put out Nader’s book when no one else would.

Sunday Arts

art

MFA set to open its first crowdsourced exhibit

Two paintings in the finals of the “Boston Loves Impressionism” contest: Vincent van Gogh’s “Houses at Auvers” (far left) and Claude Monet’s “Water Lilies.”

By James H. Burnett III

At the Museum of Fine Arts Boston, curators for the impressionist gallery invited members of the public to go online and vote for their favorite paintings.

classical music

Nelsons going all in with ‘Salome’ in BSO return

On March 6, in his first time conducting opera in Symphony Hall, Andris Nelsons will lead the BSO in a concert performance of “Salome.”

By David Weininger

One of the most highly anticipated concerts in the coming months will be the return of Andris Nelsons to the Boston Symphony podium.

On new album, cellist McCalla echoes Langston Hughes

By James Reed

Leyla McCalla, a folk musician with a keen prowess on cello, salutes Hughes’s legacy on her thoughtful debut, “Vari-Colored Songs.”

More Stories

Critic’s pick: Visual art

By Sebastian Smee

Critic’s picks: Dance

By Karen Campbell

History Repeating

Boston Symphony Chamber Players celebrate 50 years

By David Weininger

Boston-area arts letters

By June Wulff

My Instagram: Kaitlyn Galvin

By Christopher Muther

The one thing

Ame & Lulu introduces men’s collection

By Marni Elyse Katz

The ticket: Visual art

By Sebastian Smee

The ticket: Classical music

By Jeremy Eichler

The ticket: Dance

By Karen Campbell

The ticket: Pop music

By James Reed

The ticket: Television

By Sarah Rodman

Names

Strong opinions, salty language at ‘Whitey’ screening

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

Mini-Fenway Park project in Quincy stalled

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

Actor Matt Damon to talk about ‘Monuments Men’

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

Wynton Marsalis wraps up series at Harvard

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

book review

‘American Fun’ by John Beckman

By Buzzy Jackson

Reading a big part of her life

Dr. Ruth K. Westheimer: Reading a big part of her life

By Amy Sutherland

book review

‘Priscilla’ by Nicholas Shakespeare

By Matthew Price

book review

‘The Guts’ by Roddy Doyle

By Priscilla Gilman

story behind the book

Jenny Offill wrote her book one index card at a time

By Kate Tuttle

new england literary news

‘She Who Tells a Story’ exhibit on book shelves

By Jan Gardner

Seven books about

Creating a social atmosphere

By Katharine Whittemore

Local bestsellers

By Alex Stills

Travel

Cities in the States

Three days in Orlando, Fla.

Epcot Center.

By Diane Bair and Pamela Wright

It’s said that it would take about 67 days to visit all of the entertainment options in Orlando. Here’s a start.

Find paradise at a park in Florida’s Panhandle

T. H. Stone Memorial St. Joseph Peninsula State Park has 10 miles of untamed coast, 35-foot-high dunes, and a variety of camping sites and cabins.

By Diane Daniel

T. H. Stone Memorial St. Joseph Peninsula State Park is on Florida’s so-called “Forgotten Coast.”

If you go to Port St. Joe, Fla. . .

If you go to Port St. Joe, Fla. . .

Magazine

Your Home: Makeovers

Escape from the city

There’s a bit of urban chic in Sarah and Jonathan rapaport’s home, with its cerused oak floors and painted tongue-and-groove ceilings, while its quiet location is ideal for raising their young son.

By Marni Elyse Katz

Jonathan and Sarah Rapaport traded New York City for a life in Lincoln and a 4,000-square-foot mid-century-modern home in the Deck House style.

Your Home: Makeovers

Cool changes

By Christie Matheson

Update any space easily with these designer tips — and fresh products from New England companies. No contractor required.

Your Home: The Guide

What you need to know about mortgages

By Elizabeth Gehrman

The rules that kicked in last month should better protect home buyers, but be prepared for a tangle of paperwork and potentially higher costs.

More Stories

Your Home: Makeovers

Cambridge colorful

By Marni Elyse Katz

Your Home: Makeovers

With a little help from a friend

By Marni Elyse Katz

Your Home: Makeovers

A lighter touch

By Jaci Conry

Perspective

One race we don’t want to win

By Shira Springer

First Person

1,800 miles to go

Miss Conduct

Give to the giver

By Robin Abrahams

Cooking

Stand-up soups

By Adam Ried

Dinner With Cupid

The cold shoulder

Connections

Protective instincts

By Melissa Schorr

Tales From the City

Blue and red friends

Globe North

The changing faces of Medford

Medford’s black population has grown by more than 7 percent in the last 50 years.

Medford

Where do we go from here?

Juanita Payne of Medford (center) joins in a guided discussion at the West Medford Community Center on Martin Luther King Jr. Day.

By Clennon L. King

Medford residents marked Martin Luther King Jr. Day by breaking bread and broaching the delicate subject of race.

Reclaimed old timber can tell timeless stories

Arnie Jarmak with reclaimed white oak in the lobby of a Boston building, at 745 Atlantic Ave.

By Steven A. Rosenberg

In a world where decades-old buildings are regularly torn down, Arnie Jarmak sees himself a preservationist.

More Stories

Who taught YOU to drive?

Letters from readers’ mailbag: message boards

By Peter DeMarco

Winthrop, Nahant

Beach improvements are underway

By John Laidler

High School Basketball

Winthrop High girls’ off to an impressive start

By Joseph Saade

Sports Notebook

Winthrop’s Dale sizing up well

By Anthony Gulizia

North Andover

Police warn residents of phone scam

By Brenda J. Buote

Marblehead

Festival of Arts to display winning logo on Feb. 5

By Steven A. Rosenberg

Swampscott

Gymnasium to be named for Richard Lynch

By David Rattigan

Beverly

Beverly Cultural Council announces grant winners

By Steven A. Rosenberg

Winchester

Mahoney’s to hold annual tropical event

By Brenda J. Buote

Lowell

Meryl Streep to visit UMass Lowell

By Karen Sackowitz

Everett

Recent grants to fund housing plan

By John Laidler

Methuen

Rescued birds to be treated, adopted

By Karen Sackowitz

Medford

New cable committee meets Monday

By Kathy McCabe

Melrose

Family math night Thursday

By Kathy McCabe

Regional

North Shore YMCA collects tons of food

By David Rattigan

danvers

Housing plight has grim forecast

By Kathy McCabe

Tewksbury

Library to host series of talks on hobbies

By John Laidler

Globe South

A picture worth 1,000 words

Cambridge artist David Fichter was commissioned to help the students paint the 50-foot mural that now adorns a wall at Butler Elementary School in Avon. The theme the students wanted to illustrate is “Five Principles of Learning.”

By Johanna Seltz

Last summer the principal of Avon’s Butler Elementary School began thinking of how to turn a nuisance wall into something more constructive.

Butler school’s ‘Five Principles of Learning’

The Five Principles of Learning, the theme of the mural being painted at Avon’s Butler Elementary School.

Marshfield

Schools revisit plans to reassign

By Jennette Barnes

A committee working on redistricting Marshfield’s elementary schools is considering new alternatives, school officials said last week.

More Stories

Randolph

Residents worry about housing plan

By Elaine Cushman Carroll

Beverly Beckham

After ‘liberation,’ women still trapped

By Beverly Beckham

Dining Out

Neighborhood ‘upscale casual’

By Johanna Seltz

In Uniform

Globe South military notes

By Alice C. Elwell

High School Basketball

Fritzson and Mukasa maturing into dynamic duo

By Jacob Feldman

Cohasset

Nomination papers available Feb. 10

By Johanna Seltz

Duxbury

Selectmen focus on March meetings

By Jean Lang

Holbrook

Town Meeting rescheduled

By Jennette Barnes

Kingston

School district completes new plan

By Robert Knox

Hull

Cause of broken water main studied

By Johanna Seltz

Marshfield

New municipal phone system

By Jennette Barnes

Milton

Women’s struggle for equality exhibit

By Jessica Bartlett

Pembroke

New restaurants in planning stage

By John Laidler

Quincy

Police force expanded

By Jessica Bartlett

Randolph

Town seeks project managers

By Elaine Cushman Carroll

Rockland

SouthField exec at Feb. 11 breakfast

By Cara Bayles

Scituate

Tobacco regulations reviewed

By Jessica Bartlett

Weymouth

Food pantry seeks partners, new home

By Johanna Seltz

Bridgewater

School to host SAT practice

By Jennette Barnes

Brockton

Bank renews scholarship program

By Michele Morgan Bolton

Lakeville

Deadline for nomination papers approaching

By Paul Kandarian

Freetown

Town already over budget on snow removal

By Juliet Pennington

Canton

School Committee to fill interim seat

By Dave Eisenstadter

Hanson

Local Democrats plan Feb. 22 caucus

By John Laidler

Dedham

Would-be food thief stopped in his tracks

By Dave Eisenstadter

Foxborough

Board to decide on new town manager

By Michele Morgan Bolton

Norton

Openings on town building committee

By John Laidler

East Bridgewater

Officials foresee no cuts to budgets

By Rich Fahey

Mansfield

Teachers speechless at meeting

By Elaine Cushman Carroll

Plympton

Board may propose fine for littering

By Juliet Pennington

Raynham

Clerk awaiting return of census forms

By John Laidler

Middleborough

Meeting to cover plans for police station

By Michele Morgan Bolton

Sharon

Selectman may apply for administrator job

By Jennette Barnes

Mattapoisett

Sparling to discuss photos at library

By Paul Kandarian

Stoughton

Share thoughts on theater’s future

By Rich Fahey

Walpole

Aggie teacher put on leave after arrest

By Johanna Seltz

Easton

Team to evaluate police force

By Michele Morgan Bolton

Whitman

Unattended bag puts town on alert

By Elaine Cushman Carroll

Westwood

Local Democrats to elect delegates Saturday

By Michele Morgan Bolton

West Bridgewater

Police searching for bank robbery suspects

By Rich Fahey

Globe West

Digging out of the downturn

Noanet Group president Jordan Warshaw at the site of his 30-unit condominium project, which is taking the place of the Wellesley Inn.

By Scott Van Voorhis

A local developer is making a $35 million bet the western suburbs are ready for Boston-style condos slated to sell for nearly $2 million each.

Lexington

Board criticized for negotiating new pact

Superintendent Paul Ash

By Emily Cataneo

Last week, Lexington residents spoke out against the committee’s decision to enter into contract negotiations with Superintendent Paul Ash.

18th-century house offers historical time travel

The restored Durant-Kenrick House is painted in an authentic 1700s color, and its kitchen has period herbs and its grounds, heritage trees.

By Ellen Ishkanian

After eight years of determination and a fund-raising effort by Historic Newton that raised a total of $4.9 million.

More Stories

Regional districts get new leaders

By Jennifer Fenn Lefferts

Natick

Schools seeking boost in staffing

By Justin A. Rice

People

The most dangerous four-letter word

By Cindy Cantrell

In Uniform

Globe South military notes

By Alice C. Elwell

high School basketball

Wellesley boys tap deep bench

By Phil Perry

Weston

Students to perform Elvis musical

By Andrew Clark

Arlington

School staffer announces run for treasurer

By Emily Cataneo

Waltham

Join coffee chats to discuss downtown

By Jaclyn Reiss

Newton

Art exhibitions opening at library

By Ellen Ishkanian

Wellesley

Free flu vaccination clinic Wednesday

By Jaclyn Reiss

Newton

Program offers help to quit smoking

By Ellen Ishkanian

Brookline

Democrats to elect convention delegates

By Brock Parker

Brookline

Chocolate gala to take bite out of hunger

By Brock Parker

Watertown

Seniors can get help filing taxes

By Jaclyn Reiss

Needham

Needham High grad in Super Bowl

By Jaclyn Reiss

Lexington

Forum to discuss politics of food

By Emily Cataneo

Lexington

Interfaith choral festival on Feb. 9

By Emily Cataneo

Wellesley

Free home thermo-imaging reports

By Jaclyn Reiss

Lexington

Annual French festival on Feb. 9

By Emily Cataneo

Berlin

All-clear report on fire scare

By Matt Gunderson

Acton

Benson plans local office hours

By Jennifer Fenn Lefferts

Littleton

Chat with town’s new wellness coordinator

By Nancy Shohet West

Lincoln

Joint session on school renovations

By Jennifer Fenn Lefferts

Sudbury

Forum on plans for community center

By Jennifer Fenn Lefferts

Carlisle

Sign up for special-needs screening

By Nancy Shohet West

Pepperell

Learn about kindergarten on Feb. 25

By Jennifer Fenn Lefferts

Shirley

Weigh in on updates to Town Meeting

By Rachel Lebeaux

Bedford

Free flu vaccinations on Friday

By Nancy Shohet West

Harvard

Cutbacks at village post office

By Davis Bushnell

Maynard

Education group plans gala fund-raiser

By Calvin Hennick

Groton

Opening on Conservation Commission

By Jennifer Fenn Lefferts

Ayer

Officials finishing annual report

By Davis Bushnell

Marlborough

Fire chief to retire at end of year

By Calvin Hennick

Bolton

Beekeeper shared insights

By Matt Gunderson

Stow

Nashoba principal shares Top 10 list

By Matt Gunderson

Wayland

Share thoughts on administrator search

By Jennifer Fenn Lefferts

Concord

Housing position needs candidates

By Jennifer Fenn Lefferts

Shrewsbury

Nomination papers available

By Abby Jordan

Hudson

Online survey for parents

By Calvin Hennick

Northborough

Emergency-shelter volunteers needed

By Jennifer Roach

Southborough

A Valentine’s night out for parents

By Jennifer Roach

Westborough

Council awards record number of grants

By Jennifer Roach

Ashland

Democrats plan ‘tasty’ fund-raiser

By Rachel Lebeaux

Bellingham

Hearing on bridge replacement project

By Rachel Lebeaux

Franklin

Deadline to apply for O’Regan center

By Rachel Lebeaux

Medway

Registration packets for kindergarten

By Rachel Lebeaux

Plainville

Police vs. students in fund-raising game

By Rachel Lebeaux

Upton

Committee plans Stefan’s Farm hikes

By Rachel Lebeaux

Millis

Outdoor fun at Cedariver next Sunday

By Rebecca Kagle

Medfield

Turn used books into art at library

By Abby Jordan

Wrentham

Take out papers for election

By Abby Jordan

Norfolk

Council seeks entries for art show

By Abby Jordan

Milford

Tax-filing assistance at library

By Ellen Ishkanian

Sherborn

Hook up with knitting group at library

By Ellen Ishkanian