Front page

UN panel assails Vatican on priest abuse

A human rights committee said the church placed its reputation over the protection of children.

Analysis | John L. Allen Jr.

By wading into culture wars, UN may muddy its message

The UN coupled the advice about child protection with a critique on abortion and contraception.

Jay Leno performed for the Mass Dental Society at the Westin Hotel in Boston on Jan. 24, 1999.

Jay Leno’s long goodbye to ‘The Tonight Show’

After more than 20 years at the helm of “Tonight,” Jay Leno signs off Thursday.

As snow again blanketed the region, Post Office Square looked like a ghost town during the lunch hour Wednesday.

John Tlumacki/Globe Staff

A city turned desolate, all because of 10 inches of snow

For some, the sight of a routine February storm slowing the city to a crawl spoke to changing times.

CVS takes a stand, halts tobacco sales

The R.I.-based chain, which will stop selling tobacco products Oct. 1, expects to lose billions annually from the move.

A screen shot of the e-mail sent from Scott Brown’s e-mail address.

Scott Brown rents out e-mail list to spammer

Brown has cut ties with the marketer after it sent spam e-mails from his address to thousands of supporters.

The Nation

Obama admits some in party would like distance

By David Nakamura

President Obama conceded in private remarks Wednesday that some fellow Democrats might not want his help in this fall’s elections.

US rests case vs. ex-mayor Nagin

Ray Nagin is charged with corruption when he led New Orleans.

By Kevin McGill

Prosecutors allege that corruption spanned the two terms of former New Orleans Mayor Ray Nagin.

Lab analyst held in drug thefts

Joseph Graves, 32, stole and sold drugs he was supposed to be testing, prosecutors said.

By Melissa Nelson-Gabriel

Joseph Graves, a former crime lab analyst, was arrested late Tuesday on charges of stealing and selling drugs he was supposed to be testing.

The World

Bombing wave kills 34 across Iraqi capital

Smoke billowed from the first floor of a building damaged by a car bomb in central Baghdad on Wednesday.

By Sameer N. Yacoub

The attacks come as militants led by Al Qaeda are battling for control of Sunni areas to the west.

Strike disrupts commute in London

Commuters waited for a bus at Victoria Station in London as unions went on a 48-hour strike over plans to cut 950 jobs.

By Stephen Castle

The 48-hour strike, which began Tuesday, was called by unions to protest plans to cut about 950 jobs and close all ticket offices.

Dispute stops work on Panama Canal project

By Juan Zamorano and Joshua Goodman

Talks broke down on how to settle a dispute over $1.6 billion in cost overruns on the project to widen the canal.

Editorial & Opinion

alex beam

That diet book won’t work

By Alex Beam

Authors of diet books may be thinking more about the size of their bank accounts than the size of your waist.

EDWARD L. GLAESER

Tax land, not buildings, to help cities thrive

By Edward L. Glaeser

Taxing land more and buildings less would encourage the construction that many cities — including Boston — need to become more affordable and more inclusive.

JOAN VENNOCHI

Don’t dismiss Scott Brown’s chance in N.H.

Scott Brown addresses the crowd at a dinner in Nashua in April.

By Joan Vennochi

If Brown runs for the US Senate against Jeanne Shaheen, he will be a formidable candidate.

Metro

Plow operators say state owes them millions

A plow cleared snow on Route 20 in Marlborough early Wednesday. Some plow contractors said they’re frustrated by lengthy waits for payments from the state Department of Transportation, and will no longer work for it.

By Martine Powers

Some contractors said they will no longer work with the state’s transportation department because of lengthy waits for payment.

A city turned desolate, all because of 10 inches of snow

As snow again blanketed the region, Post Office Square looked like a ghost town during the lunch hour Wednesday.

By Peter Schworm and Akilah Johnson

For some, the sight of a routine February storm slowing the city to a crawl spoke to changing times.

UN panel assails Vatican on priest abuse

Members of the United Nations’ human rights committee said Vatican policies enabled child sex abuse to go on for decades.

By Michael Rezendes and Lisa Wangsness

A human rights committee said the church placed its reputation over the protection of children.

More Stories

Analysis | John L. Allen Jr.

By wading into culture wars, UN may muddy its message

By John L. Allen Jr.

Election 2014

Democratic gubernatorial candidates face off in debate

By Stephanie Ebbert

North Attleborough

Woman is rescued from burning car

By Catalina Gaitan

Business

CVS takes a stand, halts tobacco sales

Cigarettes on display at a CVS store in Pittsburgh.

By Deirdre Fernandes and Deborah Kotz

The R.I.-based chain, which will stop selling tobacco products Oct. 1, expects to lose billions annually from the move.

Report urges state to fire T’s pension directors

By Beth Healy

The new report also urges state leaders to raise the retirement age for T works from 55 to 60.

Restaurants mix batches of bourbon

Jim Carmody (right), the Seaport Hotel’s vice president and general manager, reacted to the unique taste of a bourbon sample.

By Taryn Luna

Restaurants and bars looking to stand out to bourbon fans can purchase individual barrels or create blends all their own.

Obituaries

Ralph Horne, 84; South End resident had many talents

The home of Ralph Horne in the South End was parts august museum, whimsy, and dust.

By Bryan Marquard

Dr. Horne was a chemist and an artist, earned a law degree, and also was an ordained minister.

James J. Gallagher, child development expert; at 87

By Margalit Fox

Mr. Gallagher’s work expanded educational opportunities for disabled and gifted children nationwide.

Sports

celtics 114, 76ers 108

Celtics defeat 76ers behind Jeff Green’s big game

Jeff Green went for a dunk in the first half.

By Gary Washburn

Green scored 36 points as the Celtics won in Philadelphia, exacting a measure of revenge for a last-second defeat in Boston last week.

Mikaela Shiffrin poised to be next US Olympic star

Mikaela Shiffrin is poised to step to the forefront of the American ski team with Lindsey Vonn not on this year’s Olympic team.

By Shira Springer

Shiffrin, at 18 a gold-medal skiing contender, is set to step forward as Lindsey Vonn’s heir apparent and the next superstar of US skiing.

Christopher L. Gasper

In defense of David Ortiz

 David Ortiz asking for a one-year contract extension is just good business.

By Christopher L. Gasper

It’s not an affront to good taste for Ortiz to seek a contract extension from the Red Sox. It’s just good business.

G: Style

Jay Leno’s long goodbye to ‘The Tonight Show’

Jay Leno performed for the Mass Dental Society at the Westin Hotel in Boston on Jan. 24, 1999.

By Sarah Rodman

After more than 20 years at the helm of “Tonight,” Jay Leno signs off Thursday.

Mike Toth and the art of branding

Mike Toth at his South Boston office.

By Bella English

The branding expert, who has worked with companies from J. Crew to L.L. Bean, is putting his photography on display for a good cause.

Movie Review

In ‘Monuments Men,’ battling Adolf Hitler, art thief

From left: John Goodman, Matt Damon, George Clooney, Bob Balaban, and Bill Murray in “Monuments Men.”

By Ty Burr

The WWII drama about a ragtag team of curators in uniform searching for Nazi troves of stolen paintings is a labored mishmash of tones.

More Stories

Bargain Bin

Sara Campbell holds winter warehouse sale

By Ami Albernaz

A prized pooch

By Kevin Paul Dupont

events

The week ahead: Music

By James Reed

events

Boston-area to do list

By June Wulff

The week ahead: Nightlife

By Milva DiDomizio

Mark your calendar

By June Wulff

Handyman on Call

Her door is warped, but does she need a new one?

By Peter Hotton

Music Review

2 Chainz, Pusha T get the party started

By Julian Benbow

Names

‘Frozen’ producer Peter Del Vecho has South Shore roots

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

Tom Brady, Bill Belichick hit the links in Cali

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

Stephen King issues mea culpa on Woody Allen comment

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

ICA fetes Nick Cave for his birthday, exhibit

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

Starz picks up sitcom produced by Red Sox chairman

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

Locally made ‘God Only Knows’ to screen in Berlin

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Globe North

Most host communities OK with marijuana dispensaries

Peter Hayashi of Newton said he is relieved that he will be able to buy medical marijuana legally near his home.

By Steven A. Rosenberg

With the state’s announcement of the 20 dispensary locations, opposition seems limited.

Somerville

Fashion show helps ease in dress code at Somerville school

Seventh-grader Oskervens Lenues tossed his hat at the fashion show.

By Kathy Shiels Tully

Starting this fall, the school’s 400 students must wear specific-colored polo tops and pants or skirts in either navy blue or khaki.

Stoneham

Stoneham to take over rail bed to connect bike path to Winchester, Woburn

By Christian M. Wade

Town officials want to convert the property, valued at more than $4 million, into a bike trail that would connect with surrounding communities.

Globe South

Suburban theatergoers get edgier fare

Cast members in “Spring Awakening,” a play with a controversial theme that opens at the Company Theatre in Norwell on Feb. 21.

By Katheleen Conti

Theatergoers have shown a willingness to give edgier, and even controversial, material a chance in suburbs south of Boston.

Medical marijuana decision disappoints Norwell

By Cara Bayles

Norwell was left behind when the state last week granted the first 20 licenses to open the dispensaries.

Norwell

Norwell’s police station could become affordable housing

By Juliet Pennington

While the idea is in the early stages of development, some town officials think such a use could help meet the town’s target for lower-cost housing.

Globe West

Some school systems outsourcing search for substitute teachers

At an orientation for substitute teachers at Kelly Services in Burlington, (from left) area manager Faith Burke helps Divya Lalwani and Kavita Deshmukh, both of Chelmsford, fill out forms, along with Linda Harden, supervisor of educational staffing at Kelly.

By John Dyer

Chelmsford, Danvers, Marblehead, and Stoneham use an outside contractor to accomplish the time-consuming job of finding temporary replacements for teachers.

NORTHBOROUGH

Wegmans seeks changes in state liquor law

By John Dyer

Supermarket chain Wegmans wants to sell alcohol to customers at the café in its Northborough store.

College bound

Applying to college, student with autism changes perceptions

Gianna Hitsos has auditioned for several college music programs and is close to making a decision on where she wants to attend this fall.

By Gianna Hitsos

An 18-year-old senior in high school with high functioning autism decided to apply to college as a music major.