Front page

Pope softening tone, not stance, O’Malley says

Cardinal Sean P. O’Malley is widely considered to be Pope Francis’ closest American adviser.

ESSDRAS M SUAREZ/GLOBE STAFF

Cardinal Sean O’Malley cautions that those expecting major changes in church teachings are likely to be disappointed.

Marathon security balances new rules, old ways

With two months to go before the Boston Marathon, officials are working at a feverish pace to lock in a comprehensive safety plan.

Mohegan Sun, which wants to build a Massachusetts casino, uses liens as a collection tactic.

TROY WAYRYNEN/THE COLUMBIAN VIA AP

Conn. casinos employ hardball tactic to collect debts

Foxwoods and Mohegan Sun have placed dozens of liens on homes across Mass. since the early 2000s, according to a Globe review.

Sebastien Toutant of Canada

Some Sochi venues unnerve even daredevils

While Olympic athletes pride themselves on pushing limits, some competitions, like the slopestyle event, may be getting too dangerous.

The Nation

US to provide wide legal protections to same-sex couples

Attorney General Eric Holder was to announce the new policy in New York.

By Sari Horwitz

In a new policy memo, the Justice Department will spell out the rights of same-sex couples.

Edward Snowden made use of simple software

By David E. Sanger and Eric Schmitt

Intelligence officials say Snowden used inexpensive and widely available software to “scrape” the National Security Agency’s networks.

French love triangle complicates White House dinner

President Francois Hollande of France will attend the state dinner in Washington without his companion Valérie Trierweiler, after his affair with a French actress was discovered.

By Peter Baker

President Francois Hollande will attend the state dinner in Washington without his companion Valérie Trierweiler.

The World

Sochi hijacking bid linked to Ukraine strife

By Suzan Fraser

A Ukrainian man allegedly tried to hijack a Turkey-bound commercial flight and divert it to Sochi on the day of the Olympics’ opening ceremony.

Syrian cease-fire falters; aid is held up

UN officials on Saturday were in Homs, which has been hard hit by the Syrian war, to help supply humanitarian aid.

By Diaa Hadid and Bassem Mroue

Two trucks carrying supplies into rebel-held neighborhoods in the central Syrian city of Homs turned back under heavy fire.

Iran sends signal to visiting UN team

By George Jahn

Iran is signaling that it will cooperate with UN experts visiting the country to investigate alleged nuclear weapons activity it has steadfastly denied.

Editorial & Opinion

TOM KEANE

Gold medal for US in hypocrisy

Matthew Barrett (right) says Fontbonne Academy rescinded its job offer after he listed his husband as his emergency contact.

By Tom Keane

Vladimir Putin can probably point to Fontbonne Academy and wonder about the criticism directed at Russia.

JOAN VENNOCHI

On DCF, it’s Martha Coakley vs. Martha Coakley

Martha Coakley spoke at the Globe’s media lab debate last week.

By Joan Vennochi

It’s hard to understand how Coakley the gubernatorial candidate can criticize the agency while Coakley the attorney general defends it in court.

JEFF JACOBY

Of politics, families, and skin color

General Mills’s 2014 Super Bowl ad for Cheerios brought back its famous interracial family, featuring the “Gracie” character (pictured).

By Jeff Jacoby

If you’re looking for the answers to today’s political questions in the color of your skin, you’re definitely doing it wrong.

More Stories

editorial | 50 years later . . .

The Beatles: Yesterday, but also today

editorial | 50 years later . . .

G.I. Joe: A regular guy, after all

editorial | 50 years later . . .

Sam Cooke: A change finally came

letters | Mensa members of the seas?

Smart or not, respect all animals

letters | Mensa members of the seas?

People not that bright either

letters | Will we learn to stop worrying and love slots?

State must have no mercy on R.I., Conn.

letters | Will we learn to stop worrying and love slots?

Commission must heed Legislature’s intent

letters | Will we learn to stop worrying and love slots?

Slot revenue can revitalize Mass. racing

letters | Will we learn to stop worrying and love slots?

Globe opposes slots, so it picks the worst plan?

letters | Will we learn to stop worrying and love slots?

Gambling hurts poor; voters must repeal law

Metro

Pope softening tone, not stance, O’Malley says

Cardinal Sean P. O’Malley is widely considered to be Pope Francis’ closest American adviser.

By John L. Allen Jr. and Lisa Wangsness

Cardinal Sean O’Malley cautions that those expecting major changes in church teachings are likely to be disappointed.

Conn. casinos employ hardball tactic to collect debts

Mohegan Sun, which wants to build a Massachusetts casino, uses liens as a collection tactic.

By Mark Arsenault

Foxwoods and Mohegan Sun have placed dozens of liens on homes across Mass. since the early 2000s, according to a Globe review.

Marathon security balances new rules, old ways

Officials said that more barriers will be set up along the Marathon route to separate the runners from the crowds.

By Maria Cramer and Shelley Murphy

With two months to go before the Boston Marathon, officials are working at a feverish pace to lock in a comprehensive safety plan.

Money & Careers

Paper mills find new ways to survive

Serafim Casanova worked with paper used in gaskets, at Hollingsworth & Vose in Walpole.

By Jay Fitzgerald

An old-line industry is hanging on in the digital era by finding specialized uses for its products.

Innovation economy

Startups offer tech to change the way you pay

Boston’s LevelUp is one of several payment startups that have recently attracted investment. It secured $7.5 million in September.

By Scott Kirsner

While other technologies attract more media attention, transforming retail transactions is a truly massive opportunity.

Product Reviews

Consumer Reports’ most reliable cars

Subaru’s Forrester scored high marks.

Consumer Reports’ Annual Auto Survey shows that the Japanese dominance in reliability is showing cracks.

Sports

Some Sochi venues unnerve even daredevils

Sebastien Toutant of Canada

By Shira Springer

While Olympic athletes pride themselves on pushing limits, some competitions, like the slopestyle event, may be getting too dangerous.

Bob Ryan

Peyton Manning’s place in history is secure

Peyton Manning’s place in history is secure even with a loss in last week’s Super Bowl.

By Bob Ryan

Anyone who makes a definitive judgment regarding Manning based on the Super Bowl is foolish and misguided.

on second thought

Speedskates race back in time

The author’s Donoghue Racing Skates, crude by today’s standards, could attach to the bottom of any shoe.

By Kevin Paul Dupont

These century-old speedskates, handed down from his grandfather, bring back lots of memories for Kevin Paul Dupont.

More Stories

On the Olympics

Early to rise, US women pounce on Finland

By John Powers

Christopher L. Gasper

For players and coaches, there is life after Boston

By Christopher L. Gasper

Sunday Baseball Notes

Brad Ausmus excited to begin as Tigers manager

By Nick Cafardo

Sunday Football Notes

After NFL, ex-players deal with weight issue

By Ben Volin

Sunday Hockey Notes

Mask outfitter broke mold for NHL goalies

By Fluto Shinzawa

Sunday Basketball Notes

Cavaliers get wake-up call with GM’s firing

By Gary Washburn

Bruins 7, Senators 2

Patrice Bergeron, Bruins roll over Senators

By Amalie Benjamin

on hockey

Bruins looking to deal in tight trade market

By Fluto Shinzawa

Bruins notebook

Bruins GM Peter Chiarelli looking for defensive depth

By Amalie Benjamin

Celtics Notebook

Rajon Rondo, Avery Bradley remain in limbo

By Baxter Holmes

Schools

Marie Chamberlain, Nauset wear swimming sectional crowns well

By Jake Fischer and Brandan Blom

new balance indoor grand prix

Mary Cain takes care of business in 1,000 meters

By Michael Whitmer

Duke 89, BC 68

BC overpowered by Duke’s Jabari Parker

By Michael Vega

62d Beanpot Tournament

BC goalie Thatcher Demko now part of tradition

By Tim Healey

Yale 74, Harvard 67

Harvard suffers first Ivy League defeat

By Julian Benbow

Ideas

Should the government pay you to be alive?

By Leon Neyfakh

It sounds radical, but the “guaranteed basic income” almost became law in the United States — and it’s having a revival now, with some surprising supporters.

The ‘hot hand’ might be real after all

By Keith O’Brien

Is that ballplayer ‘in the zone,’ or just lucky? A new challenge to statisticians’ skepticism.

Faces of hidden violence

Leonidas works at one of the many scallop processing plants in the city. He was attacked in his apartment just before Christmas, 2011.

By Mary Beth Meehan

Inside the mysterious crime wave challenging New Bedford.

More Stories

Uncommon Knowledge

How to stress out your baby

By Kevin Lewis

Brainiac

Um, what are ‘butter notes’?

By Kevin Hartnett

Obituaries

Robert Raiche, 85; gave teens from war-torn areas hope

Mr. Raiche helped create Friends Forever, which brings teenagers from Ireland, Israel, and Uganda to the United States.

By Kathleen McKenna

Mr. Raiche, of Danvers, launched Friends Forever, which brings teenagers from Northern Ireland, Israel, and Uganda to the United States.

Anne Heyman, 52; lawyer sheltered Rwandan orphans

Ms. Heyman gave up a legal career to pursue philanthropy.

By Douglas Martin

Ms. Heyman gave up her legal career in New York to devote herself to philanthropy.

Robert A. Dahl, defined politics and power; at 98

Mr. Dahl taught at Yale University for 40 years, staying until 1986.

By Douglas Martin

Mr. Dahl, a political scientist, was widely regarded as his profession’s most distinguished student of democratic government.

More Stories

Sunday Arts

50 years after Beatlemania, a look at a year of change

By James Reed

On Feb. 9, 1964, the Beatles sent shock waves through America’s popular culture when they debuted on “The Ed Sullivan Show.”

movies

Big-screen attempts to capture Olympic glory

Will Ferrell and Jon Heder in “Blades of Glory.”

By Mark Feeney

Relations between the Winter Olympics and film have been markedly fewer than to their warmer-season sibling, but tend to be slightly ridiculous.

books

Transgender ‘Revolutionary’

Alex Myers, author of “Revolutionary.”

By James Sullivan

Alex Myers is using the historical tale of a distant ancestor, the Revolutionary War figure Deborah Sampson, as a literary parallel to his own determination to live as a man.

More Stories

SCORE

Film composer has story of his own

By Matthew Guerrieri

Art Review

Play time for Kentridge at the ICA

By Sebastian Smee

classical CD review

Pierre Boulez Conducts Mahler, ‘Deutsche Grammophon’

By David Weininger

critic’s notebook

A mother lode of the role in Oscar nominations

By Peter Keough

My Instagram: Tianna Gallinaro

By Christopher Muther

the one thing

Hand-blown vases are gems

By Marni Elyse Katz

fashion

Is Lincoln Center falling out of fashion?

By Christopher Muther

history repeating

You can still ‘Surrender’ to Cheap Trick

By Geoff Edgers

feedback

Boston-area arts letters

By June Wulff

Critic’s picks: Visual art

By Sebastian Smee

Movie Review

‘Vampire Academy’ doesn’t cut it

By Peter Keough

Dance Review

Compagnie Käfig blazes across the stage

By Karen Campbell

Names

John Kerry sends off Olympic-bound stars

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

Johnny Depp back in ‘Whitey’ Bulger movie

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

US ambassador to the UN going punk?

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

New literary journal launched at BU

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

Local designers at New York Fashion Week

By Christopher Muther

Names

With Neil Patrick Harris, Hasty gets its man

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

Woody Allen responds in an open letter

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

ICA director a frequent visitor to museum’s bookstore

Jill Medvedow , director of The Institute of Contemporary Art

By Amy Sutherland

book review

‘The Race Underground’ by Doug Most

By Stephen Puleo

book review

‘Dancing Fish and Ammonites’ by Penelope Lively

By Priscilla Gilman

book review

‘The Human Comedy’ by Honore de Balzac

By John Freeman

the story behind the book

Ann Hood: Knitting more yarns together

By Kate Tuttle

New England literary news

Liza F. Carter’s portraits of Mongolia

By Jan Gardner

Local bestsellers

By Alex Stills

new england writers at work

Whether needing to think or write, Alan Lightman has a place to go

By Eugenia Williamson

FOR CHILDREN

Animals, boys, cars, and historic women

By Liz Rosenberg

Travel

Travel | Cities in the states

Three days in Savannah, Ga.

The Jepson Center, a Telfair museum.

By Necee Regis

Savannah is an easy city to love with its tree-filled squares and parks, well-preserved architecture, historic sites, and residents oozing Southern charm.

Travel

Dog sledding and more at Montana resort

Guests at Triple Creek Ranch near the town of Darby in western Montana can go mushing in the Bitterroot Mountains.

By Kari Bodnarchuk

Guests can experience fine cuisine, cozy log cabins, and plenty of outdoor activities with a Western twist.

If you go

If you go to Savannah, Ga.

More Stories

Stroll the wintery woods of Woodstock, Vt.

By Diane Bair and Pamela Wright

Know & Go

How to avoid visa woes

By Randy B. Hecht

In the Know

The key to getting a better hotel room

By Stephen Jermanok

Check In

Hotel Bel-Air in L.A.

By Juliet Pennington

Ask Away

Where to stay in Stowe, Vt.

By Diane Bair and Pamela Wright

Ask Away

A place for skiers and non-skiers alike

By Diane Bair and Pamela Wright

Site Seeing

American Antiquarian Society captures early America on the page

By Patricia Harris and David Lyon

Fork in the Road

Hot dogs are the favorite at George’s in Worcester

By Patricia Harris and David Lyon

Here, There, and Everywhere

Comedy in Southie to a way to track your devices

By Kari Bodnarchuk

The Tip

Bike Vegas

By Kari Bodnarchuk

Magazine

Get Happy!

Lessons on being happy from the young . . . and not so young

Unhappy millennials change the rules, and the Greatest Generation looks back.

Globe magazine

Can money buy happiness?

It’s experiences, even disappointing ones, that make us happy, researchers say.

Tragedy beneath Boston Harbor

Only the start of the tunnel had lighting and ventilation when the final mission began.

By Neil Swidey

In 1999, two divers died deep in the nearly 10-mile-long Deer Island sewer tunnel. This selection from a new book follows the detective who investigated their fatal mission.

More Stories

Examiner

Buy me love

By Molly Mirhashem

Perspective

Cruel divide

By Jim Braude

Connections

The Valentine’s dress

By Nancy McCarthy

Cooking

Northern bites

By Adam Ried

A Restaurant’s Take

Borscht belt

Tales From the City

She’s not from around here

Dinner With Cupid

Jet set

First Person

Pipe dreams

Miss Conduct

‘Are you all set?’

By Robin Abrahams

Style Watch

Gifts for guys

By Rachel Raczka

Globe North

Dress-up heaven

Young women try on gowns outside the dressing rooms at The Ultimate in Peabody.

By Lauren Spencer

Prom season is in full swing at the Ultimate boutique in Peabody. As the weekend crowds swell, the wait for a dressing room can be as long as two hours.

Familiar faces in parish changes

The exterior of the St. Michael Church in North Andover. The parish is one of a few in the Boston archdiocese that will be one large parish, with about 5,000 registered members.

By Kathy McCabe

Familiar faces will lead most of the nine new Catholic parish collaboratives formed north of Boston as part of a major reorganization of the Archdiocese.

Phase 2 collaboratives

New Catholic parish collaboratives were formed north of Boston as part of the second phase of a major reorganization of the Archdiocese of Boston.

More Stories

Newburyport

Plum Island project draws ire

By Christian M. Wade

Somerville

Residents shrug off the latest snowfall

By Clennon L. King

Suburban Diary

A thank-you to Sparks for lighting up Malden

By Kathy Shiels Tully

Dining Out

Tried and true seafood at new Turner’s spot

By Brion O’Connor

High School Basketball

Pentucket Regional girls’ basketball reloads

By Joseph Saade

Lynn

MassDOT to hold public hearings

By John Laidler

Melrose

Hoover school windows need replacing

By Kathy McCabe

Reading

Library receives funds to host The Big Read

By Brenda J. Buote

Tewksbury

Annual town census underway

By John Laidler

Wakefield

Scholarship applications available

By John Laidler

Winchester

Town census is underway

By Brenda J. Buote

Beverly

Teen poetry contest underway

By Steven A. Rosenberg

Haverhill

More than 100 participate in Possible Dreams

By Brenda J. Buote

Lawrence

Schools enter collaborative contract

By Karen Sackowitz

Marblehead

Three new police officers appointed

By Steven A. Rosenberg

Rockport

Town election nomination forms available

By David Rattigan

Globe South

More bike lanes, sidewalks urged

A part of Adams Street in Quincy now has a bike lane. Planners  are urging the city to expand such lanes to 23 miles and to extend sidewalks along streets and into neighborhoods that now lack them.

By Jessica Bartlett

A recent Metropolitan Area Planning Council report suggested laying out more than 23 miles of bike lanes for Quincy streets, along with numerous upgrades for pedestrians.

Rise in heroin use mirrors state surge

By Emily Sweeney

A series of heroin overdoses — two of them fatal — and drug arrests this year in Plymouth and Carver reflect a statewide surge in heroin use, police say.

Medford

Pastor backs proposal for 18 condos at site of school

By Kathy McCabe

A real estate developer has proposed a plan to convert the former St. Francis of Assisi School building off the Fellsway into 18 chic condos.

More Stories

Foxborough

New town manager comes via Dedham

By Michele Morgan Bolton

Beverly Beckham

A lesson in bravery from a little one

By Beverly Beckham

Dining Out

Join the club at homey Weymouth pub

By Jessica Bartlett

people

Plymouth woman marks 100th birthday

By Paul E. Kandarian

Brookline

Crime rate continues to drop

By Brock Parker

Cohasset

Quilt show’s grand finale

By Johanna Seltz

Holbrook

Pre-K through 12 project selected

By Jennette Barnes

Weymouth

School music program analyzed

By Johanna Seltz

Plymouth

Help wanted: Seasonal jobs available

By Emily Sweeney

Randolph

Committee to seek out best development uses

By Elaine Cushman Carroll

Rockland

SouthField investors push legislation

By Cara Bayles

Marshfield

New Boys and Girls Club director

By Jennette Barnes

Kingston

Hall Swamp dig extended

By Robert Knox

Duxbury

Voting will be at middle school

By Jean Lang

Abington

LaFond gets good review

By Jean Lang

Braintree

Bike path to be repaved

By Dan Adams

Milton

19 students win Scholastic Art awards

By Jessica Bartlett

Scituate

Middle school plan likely by April

By Jessica Bartlett

East Bridgewater

Board to try school choice again

By Rich Fahey

Plympton

Selectmen looking to fine litterbugs

By Juliet Pennington

Bridgewater

Town website redesigned, more user-friendly

By Jennette Barnes

Marion

Town adopts quarterly water bills

By Paul Kandarian

Wareham

Elementary school shakeup in store

By Emily Sweeney

Rochester

Town Democrats needed for caucus

By Paul Kandarian

Norton

Rail trail public meeting scheduled

By John Laidler

Mattapoisett

Land Trust offers scholarship

By Paul Kandarian

Halifax

Selectmen to ask state for more liquor licenses

By Elaine Cushman Carroll

Dedham

Regina’s Bakery closes, cites construction

By Dave Eisenstadter

Canton

Police Department becomes part of movie set

By Dave Eisentstadter

Globe West

Self-published writers, and proud of it

Deborah Plummer Bussey.

By Nancy Shohet West

Framingham writer and teacher Tilia Klebenov Jacobs refers to the decision to self-publish her first novel as “going rogue.”

Angell Memorial branches out to Waltham

Surgeon Michele Kudisch bandages London’s leg as Jessica Foley cradles the  puppy’s head following surgery at the new MSPCA-Angell West hospital.

By Jaclyn Reiss

The march of hospital satellites into the suburban market is nothing new in the human world. Now the dynamic is happening in the animal world, too.

Brookline

Effort to rename a park goes on

Tom Hennessey played defensive back with the Boston Patriots in 1965 and 1966. Above, Hennessey in 1966.

By Brock Parker

Tom Hennessey is hailed by some as the greatest athlete in the history of Brookline High School and went on to star play professionally for the Boston Patriots.

More Stories

Catholic churches combined

By Kathleen Burge

Newton

High school course names changed

By Ellen Ishkanian

Marlborough

Study on waking up sleepy downtown

By John Dyer

Franklin

Charter school seeks to grow, expand reach

By Jarret Bencks

High School Basketball

Buckley a take-charge leader for Arlington Catholic

By Phil Perry

Brookline

BATV becomes BIG

By Brock Parker

Belmont

Snow bylaw goes into effect

By Emily Cataneo

Needham

Scholarship applications available

By Jaclyn Reiss

Watertown

Marshall Home Fund offering grants

By Jaclyn Reiss

Wellesley

Suspicious device explained

By Jaclyn Reiss

Wellesley

Design a logo for Fuller Brook Park

By Jaclyn Reiss

Wayland

Wayland seeks input in town manager search

By Jennifer Fenn Lefferts

Berlin

Cable process gets underway

By Matt Gunderson

Littleton

Help the library set long-range goals

By Nancy Shohet West

Boylston

Charity is elementary

By Matt Gunderson

Lincoln

Lincoln Housing Commission seeks new member

By Jennifer Fenn Lefferts

Carlisle

Public invited to discuss wildlife over coffee

By Nancy Shohet West

Maynard

Candidates draw nomination papers

By Calvin Hennick

Harvard

New three-year teachers’ pact

By Davis Bushnell

Groton

Nomination papers available in Groton

By Jennifer Fenn Lefferts

Ayer

Town election nomination papers

By Davis Bushnell

Stow

Nashoba proposes $50.5 million budget

By Matt Gunderson

Concord

Affordable housing units available in Concord

By Jennifer Fenn Lefferts

Bolton

Subdivision selling and moving ahead

By Matt Gunderson

Shrewsbury

Valentine speaker

By Abby Jordan

Hudson

Grant to address health conditions

By Calvin Hennick

Sudbury

Sudbury selectmen hold office hours

By Jennifer Fenn Lefferts

Wayland

Wayland seeks nominations for citizen award

By Jennifer Fenn Lefferts

Westborough

Westborough Wicks hosts Valentine event today

By Jennifer Roach

Southborough

Romance writers event at library

By Jennifer Roach

Northborough

Fishing Derby to benefit resident with ALS

By Jennifer Roach

Medway

Open house at Historical Society

By Rachel Lebeaux

Framingham

Class of 1964 high school reunion

By Megan McKee

Dover

Town caucus next month

By Ellen Ishkanian

Plainville

Kindergarten registration begins

By Rachel Lebeaux

Wrentham

Radio control plane auction

By Abby Jordan

Ashland

Documentary on science and food

By Rachel Lebeaux

Holliston

Train show at Town Hall Feb. 15 and 16

By Ellen Ishkanian

Medfield

Afterschool Program open house

By Abby Jordan

Norfolk

Alexander Hamilton presentation

By Abby Jordan

Newton

Town Caucus March 10

By Ellen Ishkanian