Front page

Mass. ranks low in children’s welfare

The state’s overall performance is one of the worst in the nation, according to two watchdog groups.

Bishop John M. Borders III appealed to male congregants at Morning Star Baptist Church on Sunday to help stem the city’s violence by reaching out to men who may be losing control. Borders also invited gang members to church to find a way forward. Similar pleas rang out 2 miles away at Pleasant Hill Baptist Church.

Lane Turner/Globe Staff

Clergy in Boston make vital plea to end violence

In a city that began 2014 with a series of violent killings, ministers on Sunday called for community members to work for peace.

At the Heritage on the Garden building, Hermès is tripling the size of its store and expanding into a second floor.

Luxury businesses find fertile ground in Boston

The growth mirrors the surge of wealth that has flooded Boston in recent years.

Hotel rooms already scarce for Boston Marathon

A flood of enthusiasts are descending on the city, including some 4,500 runners prevented from finishing last year.

Allen St. Pierre, executive director of NORML, seeks marijuana legalization.

Pete Marovich for the Boston Globe

Marijuana backers hit a political chord

Lawmakers are hoping to harness the new energy behind legalization, an issue that had been on the fringe of US politics.

The Nation

Marijuana backers hit a political chord

Allen St. Pierre, executive director of NORML, seeks marijuana legalization.

By Matt Viser

Lawmakers are hoping to harness the new energy behind legalization, an issue that had been on the fringe of US politics.

US eases rules for refugees tied to terror groups

Morteza Assadi distributed fliers for a mujahedeen group as a teenager, and his immigration case has been in limbo.

By Alicia A. Caldwell

The change is one of President Obama’s first actions on immigration since he pledged to use more executive directives.

Congress seen likely to sit out much of ’14

By David Espo

The evidence is mounting that lawmakers have all but wrapped up their most consequential work of the year.

The World

Humanitarian aid trickles into war-ravaged Homs

Some civilians were able to flee a besieged district of Homs as part of an evacuation by UN workers on Sunday.

By Loveday Morris

Workers delivered aid and helped hundreds flee the besieged Syrian city amid mortar fire.

Swiss voters narrowly OK curbs on immigration

Demonstrators protested the result of the vote in Zurich. Foreigners make up 27 percent of the country’s population.

By Melissa Eddy

Voters approved proposals that would reintroduce restrictions on the number of foreigners allowed to live and work in the country.

Data show leniency on military sex crimes

Senator Kirsten Gillibrand said the records indicate some commanders refuse to prosecute sex assault cases.

By Yuri Kageyama

At US military bases in Japan, most service members found culpable in sex crimes in recent years didn’t go to prison, according to internal documents.

Editorial & Opinion

opinion | Mike Ross

Facebook meets boot camp

Emily Saul of Belmont joined the dozens who ran the Harvard Stadium steps on Christmas morning as part of the November Project.

By Mike Ross

In the November Project, social media has brought together a face-to-face community.

JAMES CARROLL

No excuses for priestly child abuse

By James Carroll

Canon law does not say that what happens in Catholic parishes and dioceses worldwide has nothing to do with Rome.

jennifer graham

Civil-rights heroes in searchable database

By Jennifer Graham

Odds are you’ve never heard of the Negro Motorist Green Book, a travel guide to spots that would serve African-Americans in the 1940s and ’50s.

More Stories

letters | Fighting over firefighters

Keep an eye on Mayor Walsh’s appointees

letters | Fighting over firefighters

Critics miss strong safety record

letters | THE IMPACT OF HEALTH REFORM IN MASSACHUSETTS

Doctor shortage predated Mitt Romney

letters | THE IMPACT OF HEALTH REFORM IN MASSACHUSETTS

To speed waits, cut paperwork

Metro

Mass. ranks low in children’s welfare

Elsa Oliver — mother of Jeremiah Oliver, 5, who is feared dead — entered district court in Fitchburg for a hearing in January. She faced charges of reckless endangerment of a child.

By Todd Wallack

The state’s overall performance is one of the worst in the nation, according to two watchdog groups.

Cape Verde asks world to call it Cabo Verde

By Akilah Johnson

Late last year, the nation that had been known in the UN as Cape Verde made a rare request to change the official name of the country.

Clergy in Boston make vital plea to end violence

Bishop John M. Borders III appealed to male congregants at Morning Star Baptist Church on Sunday to help stem the city’s violence by reaching out to men who may be losing control. Borders also invited gang members to church to find a way forward. Similar pleas rang out 2 miles away at Pleasant Hill Baptist Church.

By Jeremy C. Fox and Kathy McCabe

In a city that began 2014 with a series of violent killings, ministers on Sunday called for community members to work for peace.

Business ǀ Science

Hotel rooms already scarce for Boston Marathon

By Katie Johnston

A flood of enthusiasts are descending on the city, including some 4,500 runners prevented from finishing last year.

Luxury businesses find fertile ground in Boston

At the Heritage on the Garden building, Hermès is tripling the size of its store and expanding into a second floor.

By Taryn Luna

The growth mirrors the surge of wealth that has flooded Boston in recent years.

Corporate world finds value in the nap

Makers of the portable Ostrich Pillow say it lets users “take a comfortable power nap in the office, traveling, or wherever you want.”

By Michael B. Farrell

New tech gadgets are coming out as the nap itself is enjoying a new appreciation by professionals and amateurs alike.

Obituaries

Richard Hayman, acclaimed Pops arranger

Mr. Hayman conducted orchestras in Detroit, Hartford, Providence, and across North America.

Mr. Hayman, who died at the age of 93, helped define the sound and scope of the Boston Pops for about five decades.

Christopher Jones, 72; walked away from movie stardom

Mr. Jones is shown with his wife at the time, Susan Strasberg, in a scene from the television series “The Legend of Jesse James.’’

By Paul Vitello

Mr. Jones made only a few films, but his talent and star power drew comparisons with James Dean.

Martin Plissner, 87; shaped coverage of politics from behind the scenes

By Emily Langer

By the time Mr. Plissner retired in 1997, he had contributed to or led CBS coverage of nine presidential elections.

Sports

on the olympics

Evgeni Plushenko steps up again for Russia

Evgeni Plushenko, a four-time Olympian, is Russia’s greatest male skater. Could he compete in 2018 at age 35? “Why not?” he said.

By John Powers

Plushenko, who helped get Russia its first Sochi gold medal, doesn’t need more hardware to secure his legacy as his country’s greatest male skater.

Bode Miller finishes eighth in downhill

New Hampshire native Bode Miller, the 15th man down the mountain Sunday, makes contact with a gate during his downhill run.

By Howard Fendrich

The New Hampshire native failed to produce the sort of near-perfect performance he came up with in practice.

Shaun White is chasing history in halfpipe

“Halfpipe carries a bit more weight because it’s a defending situation,” snowboarder Shaun White said in a press conference.

By David Filipov

White will have a shot at becoming the first American male to win gold in three straight Winter Games.

G: Health

Health

Epilepsy and the small risk of death from seizures

Cambridge resident Lise Stern holding a photo of her son Eitan Stern-Robbins, who died Unexpected Death in Epilepsy (SUDEP) on Valentine’s Day 2013.

By Bella English

Cambridge resident Lise Stern believed her son had a “safe” type of epilepsy, but it wasn’t.

Romance Rumble IV: Guilty pleasures

Love Letters writer Meredith Goldstein and film critic Ty Burr have chosen their favorite guilty pleasures. Now you can choose yours.

Art Review

At Tufts, going far north to look at climate change

Camille Seaman’s “Breaching Iceberg — Greenland, August 8, 2008.”

By Mark Feeney

In “Seeing Glacial Time: Climate Change in the Arctic,” eight artists created works that draw inspiration from the polar landscape.

More Stories

Album Review | COUNTRY

Eric Church, ‘The Outsiders’

By Sarah Rodman

Album Review | SINGER-SONGWRITER

Gina Chavez, ‘Up.Rooted’

By Siddhartha Mitter

Album Review | Indie rock

Guided By Voices, ‘Motivational Jumpsuit’

By Marc Hirsh

Album Review | ROCK

Crosses, ‘Crosses’

By Ken Capobianco

Music Review

Gerald Finley, Julius Drake enthrall audience

By David Weininger

Music Review

Supové’s not-so-everyday piano performance

By Jeffrey Gantz

Book Review

‘What Makes Olga Run?’ by Bruce Grierson

By Suzanne Koven

Daily Dose

Dr. Heimlich details his controversial life

By Deborah Kotz

Daily Dose

Steps to get motivated and start exercising

By Deborah Kotz

In Practice

Doctors unprepared for medical marijuana

By Dr. Suzanne Koven

Health Answers

What exercise is best for people with knee arthritis?

By Courtney Humphries

Events

Boston-area to do list

By June Wulff

Critic’s corner: What’s on TV Monday

By Michael Andor Brodeur

Chess Notes

Weekly chess column

By Harold Dondis and Chris Chase

Names

‘Office’ star will sign, if you follow rules

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

Big names at the Big Night benefit

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

A few good men at annual date auction

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

Eliza Dushku will inspire ‘Whipping Post’

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

Eunice Feller’s Girl Scout cookie creation wins

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

Maine ski trail to honor poet Richard Blanco

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

Matt Damon, costars have a blast in Berlin

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

Seattle Seahawks players party at Foxwoods

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein