Front page

State health officials press marijuana winners

Regulators ordered companies that received licenses to submit sworn statements that their applications were truthful.

Part of the temporary Boston Marathon memorial in Copley Square in May.

Ceremony announced for Marathon victims

At just before 3 p.m. this April 15, exactly a year after the bombs exploded on Boylston Street, Bostonians will pay tribute to the survivors.

//c.o0bg.com/rf/image_90x90/Boston/2011-2020/2014/01/31/BostonGlobe.com/Metro/Images/Copy%20of%20a8887c4fb8a44b399ce737a9fe7f51d8-a8887c4fb8a44b399ce737a9fe7f51d8-0-9278.jpg Judge rejects long wait, sets Nov. 3 start for Tsarnaev trial

Defense attorneys had sought a date of September of next year at the earliest.

When Kevin White left City Hall, so did the desk. It was found in 1997. And is now back in the mayor’s office.

John Tlumacki/Globe Staff

Mayor Walsh makes use of the infamous Curley desk

The desk of former mayor James Michael Curley has been celebrated, stolen, and investigated. And now it’s back in City Hall.

Boston Police Superintendent-in-Chief Albert Goslin,left, and  Reverend Shawn Harrison examined one of 382 firearms turned in during a gun buyback in Boston in 2006.

Success of gun buyback programs is debated

Gun buybacks often bring in a impressive stockpile of firearms, but not the ones sought by law enforcement.

The Nation

Storm kills 11 as more winter havoc hits South

Traffic along Independence Boulevard crawled along the slick roadway in Charlotte, N.C.

By Kate Brumback and Christina A. Cassidy

Another wintry storm across the South iced highways and knocked out electricity to more than a half-million homes and businesses.

Nagin found guilty of taking bribes

Ray Nagin left the courthouse after being found guilty on Wednesday. His sentencing is scheduled for June 11.

By Kevin McGill

Former News Orleans mayor Ray Nagin was convicted of accepting bribes in exchange for helping businessmen secure millions of dollars in city work.

Military retirees win benefit cut battle

By David Espo

Congress voted 95 to 3 to restore full cost-of-living pension increases for younger military retirees.

The World

Survivor from Homs tells of life under siege

A UNICEF member carried a child at a shelter in Homs on Wednesday. About 1,300 people were evacuated from the city.

By Diaa Hadid

Children begged for food and women picked grass to eat, according to a first-hand account by a man who was evacuated from the Syrian city.

Thai court rejects two government overthrow claims

By Thanyarat Doksone

Thailand’s Constitutional Court rejected petitions by the ruling and main opposition parties accusing each other of attempting to overthrow the country’s system of government.

Belgium nears approval of child euthanasia

Lawmaker Sonja Becq denounced the proposal, saying science can relieve suffering until death comes.

By John-Thor Dahlburg

Belgian lawmakers clashed sharply over whether to grant terminally ill children the right to ask to die, a legal option already possessed by the country’s adults.

Editorial & Opinion

JOAN VENNOCHI

What does a casino share with Coakley?

By Joan Vennochi

Political consultant Doug Rubin represents Martha Coakley in her gubernatorial campaign. He also handles public relations for Mohegan Sun.

NICHOLAS BURNS

A Srebrenica moment in Syria?

A girl was pulled from the rubble of a building in Aleppo, Syria, after it was bombed by the government last month.

By Nicholas Burns

The killing of more than 8,000 Muslims in Srebrenica in July 1995 by Bosnian Serbs helped convince the West to intervene. What will prompt such a response in Syria?

Alex Beam

Do unto robots ...

By Alex Beam

How we treat our robots in the brave new world that we are creating may be a measure of our own humanity.

Metro

Ceremony announced for Marathon victims

Part of the temporary Boston Marathon memorial in Copley Square in May.

By David Abel

At just before 3 p.m. this April 15, exactly a year after the bombs exploded on Boylston Street, Bostonians will pay tribute to the survivors.

Success of gun buyback programs is debated

Boston Police Superintendent-in-Chief Albert Goslin,left, and  Reverend Shawn Harrison examined one of 382 firearms turned in during a gun buyback in Boston in 2006.

By Meghan E. Irons

Gun buybacks often bring in a impressive stockpile of firearms, but not the ones sought by law enforcement.

State health officials press marijuana winners

By Kay Lazar

Regulators ordered companies that received licenses to submit sworn statements that their applications were truthful.

More Stories

Classmates say goodbye to boy, 9

By Erin Ailworth and Travis Andersen

YVONNE ABRAHAM

When teens took on tobacco

By Yvonne Abraham

Woman killed in Cambridge fire

By Evan Allen and Brock Parker

Nearly 9,000 state workers earned at least $100,000

By Michael Levenson and Matt Carroll

DANVERS

Trooper hurt as cruiser is struck in front of Danvers barracks

By Catalina Gaitan and Jacqueline Tempera

Business

Mayor seeks creative ideas for public spaces

The high-tech community has already contributed two cellphone charging stations on the Greenway.

By Michael B. Farrell

Boston Mayor Martin Walsh wants to spruce up Boston and is looking for inspiration from the city’s tech and creative communities.

Icon a top-notch phone, but appeal is limited

By Hiawatha Bray

Fancy software won’t send people scurrying to the Verizon Wireless store next week for a Windows Phone.

Fidelity posts strong earnings in 2013

A Fidelity Investments office in Boston.

By Beth Healy

Strong financial markets and growing business helped boost operating earnings to $2.6 billion.

Obituaries

Sid Caesar, 91; TV shows inspired generations

Sid Caesar and Imogene Coca during a rehearsal for the Boston Opera Company’s production of “Orpheus” in 1982.

By Mark Feeney

Mr. Caesar’s three NBC series — “The Admiral Broadway Revue,” “Your Show of Shows,” and “Caesar’s Hour” — made sketch comedy a staple.

Betty Jaynes, bright light for women’s basketball coaches

By Doug Feinberg

Ms. Jaynes was the first executive director of the Women’s Basketball Coaches Association, which grew from 212 members to more than 3,000 in 2001.

Sports

spurs 104, celtics 92

Celtics can’t keep up with Spurs

Spurs point guard Shannon Brown went up for two points in the third period.

By Gary Washburn

The Celtics stayed close in the second and third quarters, but couldn’t keep pace with the Spurs in the game’s home stretch.

On baseball

Derek Jeter is the Yankee you can’t hate

Yankees’ Derek Jeter has won five World Series titles.

By Nick Cafardo

You may boo him because he’s a Yankee, but nobody who truly loves baseball could ever hate Jeter and the purity of the game he represented.

On the Olympics

Disappointed Shani Davis still focused on gold

Shani Davis finished eighth in the men's 1000 meter speedskating event.

By John Powers

Davis may have missed an opportunity to win a 3rd straight gold in the 1,000, but on Saturday he has another shot in the 1,500.

G: Style

Dedicated collectors trade Olympic pins — and memories

Bob Boehm of Lowell dons his hat adorned with Olympic pins that he wears to Olympic Games and collector shows. Boehm has accumulated some 5,000 pins and other Olympic memorabilia over the past 40 years.  The map on the wall marks the 13 Olympic Games that he has attended. He did not go to Sochi as he had planned due to personal reasons.

By Joseph P. Kahn

Olympic pin collectors hope to take home a different kind of metal at Sochi.

Stage Review

An uneven ‘Company’ from Moonbox

“Company” is centered around Bobby, a guy in his mid-30s under pressure to settle down from some of his married friends.

By Don Aucoin

Of all the marriages on display in the patchy production, none is more awkward than that between the brilliant score and the dated script.

Book Review

‘The News’ by Alain de Botton

Alain de Botton dissects how people get news.

By James Sullivan

The philosopher’s “user’s manual” for the news feels like the work of a man who would prefer to use his daily paper to wrap his fish and light his fire.

Globe North

How to keep technology from interfering with family bonds

Catherine Steiner-Adair, author of “The Big Disconnect,” talks with fifth-graders at the Glen Urquhart School in Beverly last month.

By Taryn Plumb

Technology has us constantly putting others on “pause,” author Catherine Steiner-Adair says, and thus can interfere with the parent-child bond.

Good news for chocolate lovers: It’s good for you

Mike Cross listens while his daughter, Natalie, 7, points out different varieties of chocolates at Sweet Mimi’s in Andover.

By Wendy Killeen

Mike Cross, who has a doctorate in chemistry and teaches it at Northern Essex Community College in Haverhill, has chocolate down to a science.

Woburn

Woburn prepares to install water meters

By Christian M. Wade

To comply with a state mandate, Woburn is preparing to install high-tech water meters, and some of the costs may be absorbed by property owners.

Globe South

Safety campaign tries to reshape nail salons

Kellie Deaganzio used a nail ventilation system as she applied acrylics to  a customer’s nails.

By Jean Lang

The estimated 375,000 nail technicians working in salons across the country face health hazards such as exposure to chemicals, muscle strain, and risk of infections.

Mansfield

Mansfield woman helps keep letters coming to service members

Lauren Eliopoulos and her brother George, whose military service inspired her to gather letters for the armed forces.

By Christie Coombs

On Valentine’s Day, deployed troops as well as recruits in boot camp will receive more than 4,000 cards and letters.

Behind the Scenes

Mystery writers share their secrets in Duxbury

Mystery writer Sheila Connolly is one of several authors who have had their short stories published in “Stone Cold.”

By Robert Knox

A group of local mystery writers and editors will discuss how they plotted, constructed, and populated their short stories.

Globe West

Two local works of art deal with Marathon bombings

Elizabeth Anker rehearses “A View from Heartbreak Hill,” a cycle of six songs that pays tribute to the victims of last year’s bombing at the Boston Marathon.

By Taryn Plumb

Both of the complex and emotional projects will be performed for the public in several events leading up to the April 21 Marathon.

Hopkinton Middle School teachers developing Marathon curriculum

Teacher Debra Pinto had the idea of using the Boston Marathon in coursework.

By Ellen Ishkanian

Dubbed “Desire to Insire” the curriculum will bring aspects of the 26.2-mile run into each discipline.

Arts

Singer discovers new career direction with children’s music

Stacey Peasley and her band.  An event to celebrate the release of Peasley’s new CD will be held Saturday in Natick.

By Nancy Shohet West

After Stacey Peasley began attending concerts with her children, she combined her teaching, musical, and parenting skills to restyle herself as a children’s singer.