Front page

50,000 filings for health coverage in limbo

About 50,000 health insurance applications, many filed by low-income Mass. residents, have yet to be processed.

Republicans say their effort is a response to Mitt Romney being portrayed as a heartless plutocrat, especially after a video emerged showing him rebuking 47 percent of voters.

GOP adds for-profit muscle to the fray

A group led by Mitt Romney’s former campaign manager is trying to build the party’s opposition research effort.

The rector’s condo in this building has a two-car garage, a pantry with a wine cellar, and a guesthouse.

Congregants wrestling with Trinity’s $3.6m condo

Some members of the congregation say they feel the new rectory feeds the perception that Trinity is a bastion of privilege.

White-out conditions hit just as schools were letting out in Wellesley on Dec. 9,  2005, making for a rough commute home.

Suzanne Kreiter/Globe staff/file

Has the threshold for snow days fallen?

Some argue that when it comes to snow, the region’s residents have melted into wimps. But is there proof?

For Brad Verter and Clementine Feau, parking rules have proved vexing.

For some couples, parking tickets signal a serious relationship

For couples in Cambridge and Somerville, romance comes with hundreds of dollars in tickets for excessive use of a partner’s visitor parking permit.

The Nation

GOP adds for-profit muscle to the fray

Republicans say their effort is a response to Mitt Romney being portrayed as a heartless plutocrat, especially after a video emerged showing him rebuking 47 percent of voters.

By Noah Bierman

A group led by Mitt Romney’s former campaign manager is trying to build the party’s opposition research effort.

Elizabeth Warren sees promise in Postal Service as lender

“The question is: Is it possible to design something and give people access to small-dollar loans without getting them ensnared in the trap of payday lending?” asked Senator Elizabeth Warren.

By Kimberly Railey

The Mass. Democrat is calling for post offices to go into competition with private enterprise and offer simple financial services.

Blood clot risk lasts 12 weeks after pregnancy, study says

By Marilynn Marchione

Pregnant women are more prone to blood clots because components to prevent excessive bleeding during labor naturally increase.

The World

Afghans free prisoners, drawing rebuke from US

By Jawad Sukhanyar and Rod Nordland

The release of 65 prisoners showed clearly just how thoroughly President Hamid Karzai had broken with the US military.

Italy’s prime minister quits after party votes to oust him

Prime Minister Enrico Letta had a reputation as a cool-headed politician capable of working with different parties.

By Jim Yardley

The party’s decision to dump Enrico Letta will probably have to be put to a confidence vote in Parliament.

US, Russian envoys offer to help revive Syrian talks

Residents of Aleppo, Syria, surveyed the damage after an airstrike by government forces. The government’s bombing of the city has killed an estimated 421 people in the last 12 days.

By Anne Barnard and Nick Cumming-Bruce

The deliberations did nothing to dispel uncertainty about how the process will proceed.

Editorial & Opinion

SCOT LEHIGH

To GOP’s credit, profiles in common sense

By Scot Lehigh

What we saw this week with the “clean” debt-limit increase was the realistic and responsible act of a political grown-up.

CARLO ROTELLA

Nashville comes to Boston

Lady Antebellum were the headliners at a concert last month at the TD Garden.

By Carlo Rotella

Mainstream country, flaws and all, generates a deep structure in which many people can find a niche.

opinion | H.D.S. Greenway

In Middle East, who’s David and who’s Goliath?

The Jewish settlement of Givat Zeev in the West Bank.

By H.D.S. Greenway

Israel may look like a Goliath to its neighbors, especially to the Palestinians, but to the Israelis themselves, they are always David.

Metro

50,000 filings for health coverage in limbo

“The market cannot wait and people need help,” said Health Connector head Jean Yang.

By Michael Levenson

About 50,000 health insurance applications, many filed by low-income Mass. residents, have yet to be processed.

For some couples, parking tickets signal a serious relationship

For Brad Verter and Clementine Feau, parking rules have proved vexing.

By Martine Powers

For couples in Cambridge and Somerville, romance comes with hundreds of dollars in tickets for excessive use of a partner’s visitor parking permit.

Congregants wrestling with Trinity’s $3.6m condo

The rector’s condo in this building has a two-car garage, a pantry with a wine cellar, and a guesthouse.

By Lisa Wangsness

Some members of the congregation say they feel the new rectory feeds the perception that Trinity is a bastion of privilege.

More Stories

Toddler found dead in Yarmouth home

By Brian MacQuarrie, John R. Ellement and Jenna Russell

Boy, 9, is laid to rest

By Maria Cramer

Kevin Cullen

Another lost generation in Sudan

By Kevin Cullen

Judge denies request by widow

By Shelley Murphy

Storm brings snow, rain, sleet, and wind

By Dan Adams and Haven Orecchio-Egresitz

names

Flash mob in Copley Square

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

names

Chef Ferran Adrià at Museum of Science

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Arlington

Man accused of assault of 14-year-old

By Jennifer Smith

Business

Dunkin’ Donuts cancels ads on WEEI

WEEI sports talk show hosts Gerry Callahan (right) and John Dennis. The loss of advertising is seen as a blow to the station.

By Taryn Luna

A station official said the chain was “upset” at a disparaging comment made by host Gerry Callahan.

shirley leung

Speaker Bob DeLeo likes Facebook, site unseen

By Shirley Leung

DeLeo doesn’t even know how to operate a computer, but it hasn’t stopped him from making sure technology has friends in high places.

Mayor suggests new venues for tech firms

By Callum Borchers

Boston Mayor Martin Walsh called on the region’s technology sector to look beyond Kendall Square and to places like Mattapan.

Obituaries

John Griffin, 82; chronicled the food industry unsparingly

John Griffin said he wanted “to report what’s going on, good, bad, or indifferent.”

By Bryan Marquard

Mr. Griffin, who founded The Griffin Report of Food Marketing in 1966, had “a provocative editorial approach.”

Coach Richard Moller Nielsen; guided Denmark to soccer glory

Richard Moller Nielsen (right) celebrated in Gothenburg, Sweden, after Denmark won the 1992 European Championship.

Mr. Moller Nielsen, 76, coached Denmark from 1990-96, leading the Danes to their first and only major glory at Euro ’92 in Sweden.

Sports

christopher l. gasper

Derek Jeter, Alex Rodriguez don’t compare

A-Rod always wanted to be like Jeter, universally beloved, admired, and respected. Now, he is the anti-Jeter in every possible way, says Christopher L. Gasper.

By Christopher L. Gasper

A-Rod always wanted to be like Jeter, universally beloved, admired, and respected. Now, he is the anti-Jeter in every possible way.

The ‘Sochi vibe’ is hard to pin down

Fans gather near the Olympic rings in Olympic Plaza.

By Shira Springer

While the Winter Olympics are not without their glorious moments, there is much that seems incongruous, awkward, absurdist.

US routs Slovakia in men’s hockey, 7-1

Ryan Callahan (left) and his US mates were undeterred even by Zdeno Chara (center), whose Slovakia team looked overmatched. (Photo by Streeter Lecka/Getty Images)

By Shira Springer

The Americans used a six-goal second-period surge to thrash Zdeno Chara’s Slovakian team, 7-1.

More Stories

ON THE OLYMPICS

Evgeni Plushenko, a champ right to the end

By John Powers

ON THE OLYMPICS

Evgeni Plushenko withdraws and retires

By John Powers

College hockey notebook

Vermont facing tough task against top-ranked BC

By Nancy Marrapese-Burrell

red sox notebook

Confident Felix Doubront in Red Sox camp

By Peter Abraham

Georgia Tech 74, BC 71

Georgia Tech takes down BC

By Ray Glier

COLLEGE BASKETBALL ROUNDUP

BC women can’t keep pace with Notre Dame

Dispatches from Sochi

Foul called in curling

G: Arts & Movies

Has the threshold for snow days fallen?

White-out conditions hit just as schools were letting out in Wellesley on Dec. 9,  2005, making for a rough commute home.

By Beth Teitell

Some argue that when it comes to snow, the region’s residents have melted into wimps. But is there proof?

BSO hosts the secret voice of ‘West Side Story’

Marni Nixon dubbed the vocals of Natalie Wood (above, with Richard Beymer) in the 1961 film “West Side Story.”

By Terry Byrne

Audiences can hear Marni Nixon’s work when the Boston Symphony Orchestra performs Leonard Bernstein’s lush score while screening the movie.

Classical Notes

A return to Boston for pianist Tiberghien

“America and Europe are really two very different musical worlds. It’s quite difficult sometimes to develop in both continents,” said Cédric Tiberghien.

By David Weininger

Cédric Tiberghien’s local recital debut is at hand — a Celebrity Series of Boston concert at Longy’s Pickman Hall.

More Stories

Photography review

Looking at America then and New Guinea now

By Mark Feeney

Movie Review

A likable ‘Like Father, Like Son’

By Peter Keough

Movie Review

‘12 O’Clock Boys’ time well spent

By Ty Burr

Scene & Heard

Bridge Sound and Stage, a hub for local hip-hop

By Martín Caballero

Noisy Neighbors

Confidence Presents: Gdot & Born featuring Edo. G

By Martín Caballero

Noisy Neighbors

Love Sux: An Anti-Valentines Day Party

By Alex Stills

events

Boston-area to do list

By June Wulff

names

Celtic’s fulfilling New Zealand boy’s wish

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

names

‘Witness Uganda’ premieres at the ART

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

names

Van Gogh in new MFA show

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

names

Asphalt Orchestra to record Pixies’ ‘Surfer Rosa’

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

names

Ted the bear heading to ‘Wahlburgers’?

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Stage Review

In ‘Witness Uganda,’ a man on a mission

By Sandy MacDonald