Front page

IRS is America’s feared and failing agency

The federal agency is under attack, distrusted, and underfunded, yet crucial to the nation’s survival and prosperity.

Erin Vasselian learned of the death of her husband, Daniel, two days before Christmas. His gear fills her home.

JOHN TLUMACKI/GLOBE STAFF

In Afghan war’s twilight, two farewells in Mass.

For two families, their loss is as final as the other 2,310 US military deaths that occurred during the 12 years of America’s longest war.

Target disclosed recently that hackers stole the debit and credit cards of 40 million customers and the PIN numbers, e-mails, and addresses of 70 million people.

Rick Wilking/Reuters

More firms buying insurance for data breaches

US businesses are rushing to buy insurance coverage against the expense of being hacked or losing sensitive customer data.

Research on stem cells transforming sciences

With a series of recent advances, the underlying principles of basic biology are in the process of being rewritten.

The Nation

IRS is America’s feared and failing agency

Nina Olson, as a sort of in-house watchdog, is supposed to tell Congress what the Internal Revenue Service is doing wrong. One of her reports called the IRS an “institution in crisis.”

By Michael Kranish

The federal agency is under attack, distrusted, and underfunded, yet crucial to the nation’s survival and prosperity.

Ga. debates leniency over guns brought to airport

By Ray Henry

Georgia lawmakers are debating a bill that would offer leniency to passengers who mistakenly bring their guns to the airport.

Pa. suspect says she’s killed 22 others

Miranda Barbour, 19, is charged with killing a man she and her husband met through Craigslist.

Miranda Barbour, 19, is charged with killing a man she and her husband met through Craigslist.

The World

John Kerry warns Indonesia on climate threat

Secretary of State John F. Kerry said Sunday that rising seas could put much of Jakarta, Indonesia’s capital, under water and cripple the country’s fishing industry.

By Michael R. Gordon and Coral Davenport

The secretary of state said failure to act would jeopardize the nation’s resources and damage its economy.

Morsi’s lawyers protest use of soundproof glass cage

Mohamed Morsi and his codefendants complained that they could not hear the court proceedings.

By Hamza Hendawi

Mohamed Morsi and his codefendants complained that they could not hear the court proceedings.

Protesters vacate Kiev’s City Hall in exchange for amnesty

Antigovernment protesters carried makeshift shields and covered their faces as they left City Hall in Kiev on Sunday.

By Andrew Higgins

The departure from the building in the capital after more than two months eased tensions — temporarily, at least.

Editorial & Opinion

opinion | Mike Ross

Stuck in dry dock

An aerial view of Boston’s Marine Industrial Park.

By Mike Ross

Out-of-date zoning regulations are hampering innovation on Boston’s waterfront.

JAMES CARROLL

Washington and Lincoln’s challenges are ours now

By James Carroll

Today’s systemic injustice threatens the moral meaning of America in ways that might seem familiar to these men.

JOHN E. SUNUNU

Keeping Obama at arm’s length

President Obama.

By John E. Sununu

The giddy electoral success of 2008 has been tempered by the harsh political reality of 2014.

More Stories

editorial | service not included

Tipping system exacerbates unfair pay at restaurants

letters | echoes of history in the Middle East

At root, rejection of a Jewish state

letters | echoes of history in the Middle East

Israel’s deeds fomented conflict

Metro

In Afghan war’s twilight, two farewells in Mass.

Erin Vasselian learned of the death of her husband, Daniel, two days before Christmas. His gear fills her home.

By Brian MacQuarrie

For two families, their loss is as final as the other 2,310 US military deaths that occurred during the 12 years of America’s longest war.

Research on stem cells transforming sciences

Charles Vacanti (right), with Koji Kojima, has been at the vanguard of stem cell creation.

By Carolyn Y. Johnson

With a series of recent advances, the underlying principles of basic biology are in the process of being rewritten.

Adrian Walker

Medical marijuana off to rocky start

By Adrian Walker

Medical marijuana was always a divisive idea in Mass., but last week will be remembered as the moment it became a full-fledged fiasco.

Business ǀ Science

More firms buying insurance for data breaches

Target disclosed recently that hackers stole the debit and credit cards of 40 million customers and the PIN numbers, e-mails, and addresses of 70 million people.

By Deirdre Fernandes

US businesses are rushing to buy insurance coverage against the expense of being hacked or losing sensitive customer data.

Shoemakers race to boost runners’ performance

From left to right: The Adidas Springblade Razor; The Nike Flyknit Lunar2; and the New Balance Fresh Foam 980.

By Taryn Luna

Boston shoemakers and others across the US are finding new ways to tailor shoes to runners’ body movements.

Flush with success, Netflix jousts with HBO

“House of Cards” was one of the big stories in television last year, and its highly anticipated second season was released with much fanfare Friday.

By David Carr and Ravi Somaiya

The two companies are developing a sharp-edged rivalry over which firm will control the future of home entertainment.

Obituaries

Bob McQuillen, 90; helped revitalize contra dancing

Mr. McQuillen jammed with Bob Abrams (guitar) and Sarah Bauhan (flute) in 1998.

By Emma Stickgold

Mr. McQuillen spent decades revitalizing the tradition of contra dancing, often performing songs he composed.

Pete Camarata, 67; fought fellow Teamsters for reforms

Mr. Camarata stood under a portrait of Jimmy Hoffa , the former Teamsters president, in Detroit in 1978.

By Douglas Martin

Mr. Camarata was beaten after calling for a rule that would expel any Teamster officer who accepted a bribe from an employer.

Sports

US 5, Slovenia 1

Phil Kessel’s hat trick keys US rout of Slovenia

Joe Pavelski assisted on all three goals by Phil Kessel (right), who helped the US avoid a post-Russia letdown by scoring just 64 seconds in.

By Shira Springer

The Americans went 3-0 in Group A in the preliminary round and received a bye into the quarterfinals.

US women’s hockey sees chance to improve

The US women’s hockey team plays Sweden in an semi-final game Monday.

By Shira Springer

With a semifinal matchup against Sweden set for Monday, the US needs to rebound from a painful loss to Canada.

ON OLYMPICS

US marquee names haven’t delivered in Sochi

Star American speedskater Shani Davis has failed to medal in Sochi.

By John Powers

This has been a Games where the stars’ sponsors could have saved a bundle by having them compete on commission.

More Stories

East 163, West 155

NBA in transition on display at All-Star game

By Gary Washburn

MIAA Division 1 boys’ swimming

St. John’s Prep wins another Div. 1 swim title

By Jillian Saftel

Boys’ basketball notebook

Football players lead Everett to success on the hardwood

By Jake Fischer

MIAA DIVISION 4 STATE TRACK

Pembroke boys, girls sweep Div. 4 state track titles

By Sebastian Lena

MIAA DIVISION 2 BOYS’ SWIMMING

Weston captures Division 2 state swimming title

By Coryn Doncaster

Dan Shaughnessy

Dustin Pedroia healthy, ready to lead way

By Dan Shaughnessy

ON BASEBALL

Red Sox can deal with loss of Ryan Dempster

By Nick Cafardo

Red Sox Notebook

Red Sox sign reliever Francisco Cordero

By Peter Abraham

ALL-STAR GAME NOTEBOOK

Adam Silver wants NBA’s minimum draft age raised

By Gary Washburn

Notre Dame 73, BC 69

BC can’t get over hump in loss to Notre Dame

By Anthony Gulizia

daytona 500 qualifying

Notes: Greg Biffle, Carl Edwards afforded opportunity

By Michael Vega

G: Health

Urgent care centers in Mass. fill a gap

Luke Jones, 15, who injured his foot while ski jumping, is accompanied by his mother, Emily Jones (left), while waiting to be seen at CareWell Urgent Care in Needham.

By Liz Kowalczyk

Health insurers have begun to usher patients toward the clinics, and away from more expensive ERs, for non-life-threatening conditions.

Q & A

Bringing home plight of abandoned children

Dr. Charles Nelson, a professor of pediatrics at Harvard Medical School and Boston Children’s Hospital, has studied the effects of abandonment and institutionalization on children in Romanian orphanages.

By Karen Weintraub

Charles Nelson has studied the effects of abandonment and institutionalization on children in Romanian orphanages.

Daily Dose

School-based brain training shown to alleviate ADHD

By Deborah Kotz

In a new study, a therapy called neurofeedback and cognitive training enabled children to have longer attention spans.

More Stories

Nutrition and you!

How to eat like you’re an Olympian

By Joan Salge Blake

Health Answers

When and for how long is a cold contagious?

By Courtney Humphries

Stage Review

In ‘Absence,’ a painful portrayal of dementia

By Sandy MacDonald

Book Review

‘Connected’ by Steven Cassedy

By Hiawatha Bray

Chess Notes

Weekly chess column

By Harold Dondis and Chris Chase

Events

Boston-area to do list

By June Wulff

Names

Authors in town to spice up Valentine’s Day

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

Actor John Krasinski tweets baby news

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

Chris Evans is Daytona 500 grand marshal

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

Rower Mark Hunter talks coaching in Brighton

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

Music, more from Trey Songz at Foxwoods

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Music Review

Boston Baroque serves up a French valentine

By Jeffrey Gantz

Names

Massachusetts presence at the BAFTAs

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein