Front page

Opiate overdoses bring call for more drug courts

“We can’t do it alone: We need your help,” said Paula Carey, chief justice of the state’s trial court, at a public forum on opiate abuse.

Linda Pelletier was taken to Massachusetts General Hospital after collapsing in the courthouse on Monday.

Conn. teen in long custody battle to move again

Caught in a custody fight between her parents and Mass. child protection officials, Justina Pelletier will be moved to a foster care facility.

Health data industry fights FDA oversight

The fast-growing industry that makes digital medical records is gearing up for a lobbying fight against federal safety regulations.

Riders’ attitudes toward immigration changed after immigrants appeared at several MBTA commuter rail stations.

JESSICA RINALDI/GLOBE STAFF

Does riding the commuter rail change attitudes on immigration?

A Harvard study found that routine exposure to unfamiliar people on public transportation, though initially jarring, can shift attitudes for the positive.

Secretary of State William F. Galvin is examining year-end lump sum 401(k) payments.

Galvin opens inquiry into retirement accounts

Secretary of State William Galvin is examining year-end lump sum 401(k) payments that save employers money but could cost workers.

The Nation

IRS proposal governing nonprofits draws fire

Former IRS official Marcus Owens said the Treasury backed mixing tax, election laws.

By Kimberly Railey

Public opposition has been heavy to a proposal to regulate political spending by nonprofit social welfare organizations.

Chuck Hagel’s plan to shrink military criticized

Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, General Martin Dempsey (right), passed Chuck Hagel during a press conference.

By Robert Burns

Republicans in Congress were quick to criticize some changes in the military being sought by the defense secretary.

Supreme Court tangles over EPA authority

By Adam Liptak

The court is trying to decide whether the EPA has the authority to regulate greenhouse gas emissions from stationary sources.

The World

Ukraine’s ex-president accused of mass murder

A tribute has been set up for slain protesters in Kiev. Meanwhile, an arrest warrant was issued for the ousted president.

By David M. Herszenhorn

Ukraine’s acting interior minister said that authorities were in pursuit of ousted president Viktor Yanukovych.

Russia questions legitimacy of Ukraine government

“If people crossing Kiev in black masks and Kalashnikov rifles are considered a government, it will be difficult for us to work with such a government,” said Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev.

By Steven Lee Myers

The escalating criticism from Moscow provided the strongest signals yet that Russia may not easily accept the political changes.

On Ukraine, a wary stance from Obama

By Peter Baker

President Obama has approached events in Ukraine with a clinical detachment aimed at avoiding instability.

Editorial & Opinion

TOM KEANE

The luck of the vote

Rose Napolitano attended a pro-casino rally in Revere on Saturday.

By Tom Keane

Revere votes today on whether it wants casino gambling, and whether it wants the changes that a casino would surely bring.

James Piereson and Naomi Schaefer Riley

Popping the higher education bubble

By James Piereson

College tuition has become too expensive, and stakeholders must persuade colleges and universities to control costs.

PAUL MCMORROW

Spend a lot — but not on the Olympics

By Paul McMorrow

Boston doesn’t need the Olympics to do big things. If the region is serious about spending to modernize, it shouldn’t throw billions at an athletic exhibition.

Metro

Conn. teen in long custody battle to move again

Linda Pelletier was taken to Massachusetts General Hospital after collapsing in the courthouse on Monday.

By Patricia Wen

Caught in a custody fight between her parents and Mass. child protection officials, Justina Pelletier will be moved to a foster care facility.

Does riding the commuter rail change attitudes on immigration?

Riders’ attitudes toward immigration changed after immigrants appeared at several MBTA commuter rail stations.

By Martine Powers

A Harvard study found that routine exposure to unfamiliar people on public transportation, though initially jarring, can shift attitudes for the positive.

Opiate overdoses bring call for more drug courts

US Senator Edward J. Markey called the increase in opiate drug deaths “a scourge like we have never seen before.”

By Brian MacQuarrie and Joshua Miller

“We can’t do it alone: We need your help,” said Paula Carey, chief justice of the state’s trial court, at a public forum on opiate abuse.

More Stories

Officials raise alarm on measles threat

By Chelsea Rice and Haven Orecchio-Egresitz

DiMasi pays off fine of $65,000

By Travis Andersen

Rider rescued after horse falls

By Catalina Gaitan

NORTON

Wheaton college selects new president

By Haven Orecchio-Egresitz

Business

Galvin opens inquiry into retirement accounts

Secretary of State William F. Galvin is examining year-end lump sum 401(k) payments.

By Deirdre Fernandes

Secretary of State William Galvin is examining year-end lump sum 401(k) payments that save employers money but could cost workers.

MBTA retirement board split over opening up files

Andrew Whittle and Janice Loux consulted at a hearing of the Massachusetts Department of Transportation board of directors.

By Beth Healy

The panel remains divided on divulging more of the pension fund’s records following the disclosure of a $25 million investment loss.

White House, MIT in data privacy workshop

John Podesta was named to lead a general review of big-data and privacy practices.

By Michael B. Farrell

Obama administration officials will come to Cambridge next week to be schooled on safeguarding personal privacy.

More Stories

Apparent theft rattles the Bitcoin world

By Nathaniel Popper and Rachel Abrams

Boston Capital

Fighting the tide on health care costs

By Steven Syre

Carl Icahn again urges eBay to spin off PayPal

By Mae Anderson and Michelle Chapman

Auto culture may be driven to change

By Jeff Green and Keith Naughton

Tobacco maker bars animals in tests

By Michael Felberbaum

Obituaries

Harold Ramis, versatile crafter of comedy; at 69

Mr. Ramis believed that “comedy is inherently subversive.”

By Douglas Martin

Mr. Ramis’s greatest legacy may have been his ability to infuse comedy with a broader, sometimes spiritual message.

5 classic comedies Harold Ramis helped create

Mr. Ramis directed Caddyshack,” starring Bill Murray, and collaborated on its script.

You may not know his name or remember his face, but you have surely heard of at least some of the movies that Harold Ramis directed, helped write, or appeared in.

Sports

Jazz 110, Celtics 98

Jazz too tough as Celtics end trip winless

Utah’s Alec Burks (team-high 21 points) was in the middle of the Jazz’s victory, as well as between Celtics forwards Kelly Olynyk and Brandon Bass.

By Baxter Holmes

In the last two months, the Celtics have made two road trips out West and have come home with zero wins.

ON BASEBALL

What will Red Sox lineup look like?

Is Dustin Pedroia a good fit as the Red Sox’ leadoff hitter?

By Nick Cafardo

The questions start at the top: With Jacoby Ellsbury gone, the Sox’ leadoff hitter is unknown. Is Dustin Pedroia a good fit?

Venezuelan Red Sox hope for best in home country

Christian Vazquez clicks away as Red Sox from Venezuela pose with their country’s flag and messages calling for peace.

By Peter Abraham

The familiar routines of spring training have been altered by concern for the safety of their family and friends back home.

G: Living

Expanding minds, social circles through classical music

Musicians Julia Yang (left) and Shira Majoni.

By Jon Christian

Groupmuse is a website that matches up people who want to volunteer their home for a semi-public classical music performance with musicians and guests.

Annie Clark is more St. Vincent than ever

Annie Clark says that she chased after the archetype of a “near-future cult leader” on her latest album, “St. Vincent.”

By Marc Hirsh

Clark, who plays the House of Blues on Thursday, said she chased after the archetype of a “near-future cult leader” on her latest album, “St. Vincent.”

Photography Review

Anne Whiston Spirn makes a sense of place visible

“Södra Sandby, Sweden” part of “The Eye Is a Door” exhibit at Smith College.

By Mark Feeney

The places in Spirn’s “The Eye Is a Door” exhibit range from very near to very far: Nahant, where Spirn lives, Japan, Australia, Iceland, Sweden.

More Stories

Stage Review

‘Equally Divided’ hobbled by cliches

By Joel Brown

Music Review

Left breathless by Beethoven

By Matthew Guerrieri

Events

Boston-area to do list

By June Wulff

Names

Mark Ruffalo touts clean water on the Cape

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

Supporting the ART at Park Plaza Castle

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

Ice T and Coco visit Boston nightclub Venu

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

Lyor Cohen talks business at Berklee

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

Feast of Music for New England Conservatory

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

Peter Horton starts his local ‘Odyssey’

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

Starring role for Amanda Seyfried in ‘Ted 2’

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

Eliza Dushku reading for ‘How I Met Your Dad’

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein