Celtics Live

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Halftime

Front page

Report portrays do-little Suffolk County register

Patricia Campatelli set a punitive tone, and often worked only 15 hours a week at her $122,500 a year job, a new report has found.

Sarah Garant and her family live year-round on their sailboat, which is covered in plastic during the cold months

David L. Ryan/Globe Staff

Boat dwellers ride out winter in Boston Harbor

A hardy band of outliers has been greeting the winter days from inside cozy rooms that bob gently with the current in the harbor.

Company aims to reinvent reading in mobile era

Spritz Technology, a Boston-area company, has created a radical new reading technology developed for this era of small screens.

Changes sought in parole hearings for ex-juveniles

At issue is how to set up the hearings for a dozen Mass. inmates sentenced as juveniles to life sentences for first-degree murder.

Ronald Eckert fought back from a grim prognosis.

Bill Wippert for the Boston Globe

Immune therapy lifts hopes in fight with cancer

An immune therapy approach that was on the fringes of cancer therapy is suddenly the hottest trend in cancer drug development.

The Nation

Democrats aim to exploit GOP on immigration

“I really believe that the strongest expression of American citizenship is serving this country in uniform,” said Representative Mike Coffman, who has proposed granting citizenship to any young person in the US illegally who enlists.

By Nicholas Riccardi

Republicans in nine races are seen as vulnerable if the House does not pass an immigration bill before the November election.

Tribes act to counter new New York casinos

By Carolyn Thompson

New York state is about to take bids for its first non-Indian casinos.

Police back controls on Calif. medical marijuana industry

By Lisa Leff

A state lawmaker has introduced legislation to regulate the state’s free-wheeling medical marijuana industry.

The World

Seven nations join search for lost Malaysian plane

Searchers for the missing airliner scanned the waters off the northeastern coast of  Malaysia from the air.

By Thomas Fuller and Eric Schmitt

Authorities deflected troubling questions about two passengers who used passports listed in an international database as lost or stolen.

Missing jet’s passengers had work, adventure in mind

A Chinese relative of passengers aboard a missing Malaysia Airlines plane was accompanied from her hotel room in Beijing on Sunday.  From North America to Australia and China, families and friends were enduring an agonizing wait for news about the fate of the plane.

By Rod McGuirk

From the US to Australia and China, families and friends are enduring an agonizing wait for news about Flight MH370.

Database of stolen passports often ignored

Two passengers on the missing Malaysia Airlines aircraft were traveling on the stolen passports of Italian citizen Luigi Maraldi (pictured) and an Austrian citizen. The stolen passports were listed on Interpol’s database of stolen documents, but authorities never checked it before the passengers boarded the flight.

By Jamey Keaten

Interpol knew about stolen passports that two passengers used to board an ill-fated Malaysia Airlines flight, but no authorities checked the database.

Editorial & Opinion

JAMES CARROLL

Shift in defense

By James Carroll

The Ukraine crisis reveals the need to push ahead with military downsizing.

opinion | jennifer graham

A school bus is not a billboard

By Jennifer Graham

When she waves goodbye to me in the morning, I prefer my daughter’s head not be atop, say, an image of a Little Caesar’s pizza.

opinion | Lev Golinkin

Vladimir Putin’s enemies aren’t all good guys

Svoboda leader Oleh Tyahnybok attends an antigovernment rally in Kiev in February.

By Lev Golinkin

Ukraine’s new ruling coalition includes some disturbing elements, most notably the Svoboda Party.

Metro

Report portrays do-little Suffolk County register

Patricia Campatelli is running for reelection.

By Sean P. Murphy and Andrea Estes

Patricia Campatelli set a punitive tone, and often worked only 15 hours a week at her $122,500 a year job, a new report has found.

Boat dwellers ride out winter in Boston Harbor

Sarah Garant and her family live year-round on their sailboat, which is covered in plastic during the cold months

By Jeremy C. Fox

A hardy band of outliers has been greeting the winter days from inside cozy rooms that bob gently with the current in the harbor.

Changes sought in parole hearings for ex-juveniles

By Milton J. Valencia

At issue is how to set up the hearings for a dozen Mass. inmates sentenced as juveniles to life sentences for first-degree murder.

Business ǀ Science

Company aims to reinvent reading in mobile era

By Michael B. Farrell

Spritz Technology, a Boston-area company, has created a radical new reading technology developed for this era of small screens.

Technology gives certainty to seafood purchases

Bill Thistlewood prepares to weigh razor clams at Ipswich’s town wharf for sale to Red’s.

By Martin LaMonica

Seafood dealer Red’s Best has developed software that ensures the catch is local, high-quality, and worth the extra price.

BetaBoston

Echo Nest, Spotify link may target Pandora

Could Spotify further chip away at Pandora?

While Pandora remains the superior product, that could change with Spotify’s acquisition of The Echo Nest of Somerville.

Obituaries

William Clay Ford, 88, scion of auto family, Lions owner

Mr. Ford brought the Lions back to the city but the team still hasn’t made it to a Super Bowl.

By Douglas Martin

Mr. Ford served as an employee and board member of the automaker for more than half of its 100-year history.

Paul Sally, researcher, ‘pirate’ professor of math; at 80

Paul Sally (left), shown with MIT professor Sigurdur Helgason, was known for his spirited classroom presence.

By Bryan Marquard

Dr. Sally was so quotable that students created a second Wikipedia page for him to house his pithy asides.

‘Band of Brothers’ vet William Guarnere dies at 90

Combat exploits earned Silver Star recipient William ‘‘Wild Bill’’ Guarnere his nickname.

PHILADELPHIA — William ‘‘Wild Bill’’ Guarnere, one of the World War II veterans whose exploits were dramatized in the TV miniseries ‘‘Band of Brothers,’’ has died. He was 90.His son, William Guarnere Jr., confirmed Sunday that his father died at Jefferson University Hospital in Philadelphia. Mr. Guarnere was rushed to the hospital early Saturday and died of a ruptured aneurysm early Saturday night.The HBO miniseries followed the members of Easy Company, 506th Regiment, 101st Airborne Division from training in Georgia in 1942 through some of the war’s fiercest European battles through the war’s end in 1945. Mr. Guarnere was portrayed by the actor Frank John Hughes.Mr. Guarnere, whose combat exploits earned him his nickname, lost a leg while trying to help a wounded soldier during the Battle of the Bulge. His commendations included the Silver Star, two Bronze Stars, and two Purple Hearts.

Sports

Celtics 118, Pistons 111

Rajon Rondo, Celtics handle the Pistons

Rajon Rondo grabbed a loose ball from the Pistons’ Greg Monroe.

By Baxter Holmes

Rondo tallied a season-high 18 assists with no turnovers in the Celtics’ 118-111 win Sunday night.

Dan Shaughnessy

Celtics won’t hit bottom of the league

The Celtics played good and hard against the Pistons.

By Dan Shaughnessy

It’s supposed to be Tankapalooza, but on nights like Sunday, it looks like the Celtics didn’t get the memo.

Bruins 5, Panthers 2

Florida sweep puts Bruins first in the East

Reilly Smith (18) hugs teammate Torey Krug after Krug broke a 1-1 tie against the Panthers in the third period.

By Amalie Benjamin

After Sunday’s 5-2 victory over the Panthers, the Bruins now sit atop the Eastern Conference standings.

G: Health

Teens’ brains make them more vulnerable to suicide

Suicide is the third leading cause of death among teens 15 to 19 years old, according to the National Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

By Jan Brogan

Researchers are beginning to understand exactly why a teenager’s brain is so tempestuous.

Immune therapy lifts hopes in fight with cancer

Ronald Eckert fought back from a grim prognosis.

By Carolyn Y. Johnson

An immune therapy approach that was on the fringes of cancer therapy is suddenly the hottest trend in cancer drug development.

Q & A

Learning about life after brain injury

By Karen Weintraub

Twenty-five years after a traumatic brain injury gave her amnesia, Su Meck is getting ready to graduate from Smith College.

More Stories

Daily Dose

Chemotherapy and terminal cancer patients

By Deborah Kotz

MD MAMA

Teaching gratitude, and perspective, to children

By Dr. Claire McCarthy

Television Review

‘Believe’ has lots of pedigree, little potential

By Matthew Gilbert

Music Review

Jennifer Nettles echoes vintage ’70s fare

By Stuart Munro

Music Review

Stile Antico celebrates its 50th US concert

By David Weininger

Comedy Review

Handler’s humor built on her life, filthy musings

By Katie Johnston

Book Review

‘A Life in Men’ by Gina Frangello

By Eugenia Williamson

Chess Notes

Weekly chess column

By Harold Dondis and Chris Chase

Events

Boston-area to do list

By June Wulff

Names

Seth Meyers talks about his show at SXSW

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

The Smithereens rock out in Natick

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

Celtics wedding was a slam dunk

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

Celebrities spotted here, there around Boston

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein