Front page

Protein may guard against Alzheimer’s disease

The failure of a natural system that protects brain cells may lead to Alzheimer’s disease, new research suggests.

Brianna Hiscock, 17, played with Rosie at Worcester Tech’s Tufts at Tech Community Veterinary Clinic.

Pat Greenhouse/Globe Staff

Worcester a model for Boston’s only vocational school

In many ways, Madison Park Technical Vocational High School is where Worcester Tech was a decade ago.

Tech Lab

Why fix Internet oversight if it’s not broken?

If the Internet must submit to a measure of political influence, I want the politicians to be people with the open-minded spirit of the Internet’s creators.

Walsh seeks greater say on casinos in Everett, Revere

Martin Walsh said Boston is entitled to “host community” status, which would give it far greater power over the proposed casinos.

Senator Edward J. Markey’s actions in the Herbalife controversy risk making him appear as an instrument of wealthy interests, rather than defender of the little guy.

Penchant for press releases ensnares Ed Markey

Edward Markey’s strategy of constant press releases has gained him exposure, but also ensnared him in a controversy over a lobbyist’s financial gain.

Wheelock Family Theatre's production of

critic’s notebook

‘Millie’ flap highlights how old plays are rife with stereotypes

The uproar over the depiction of Asian-Americans in a Newton high school musical shows how dated theatrical canon can seem for modern audiences.

The Nation

Penchant for press releases ensnares Ed Markey

Senator Edward J. Markey’s actions in the Herbalife controversy risk making him appear as an instrument of wealthy interests, rather than defender of the little guy.

By Noah Bierman

Edward Markey’s strategy of constant press releases has gained him exposure, but also ensnared him in a controversy over a lobbyist’s financial gain.

Two states win court approval on voter rules

By Fernanda Santos

A judge ordered federal election authorities to help Kansas and Arizona require their voters to show proof of citizenship in state and local elections.

Bin Laden son-in-law tells how he became spokesman

Sulaiman Abu Ghaith testified Wednesday that he did not have any role in Al Qaeda plots against the United States.

By Benjamin Weiser

Sulaiman Abu Ghaith unexpectedly took the stand in his own defense Wednesday against charges that include conspiring to kill Americans and providing material support to terrorists.

The World

Ukraine bows to Crimea seizure, plans for pullout

By John-Thor Dahlburg and Peter Leonard

Ukraine announced plans Wednesday for mass troop withdrawals from the strategic peninsula as Moscow-loyal forces seized control of Kiev’s naval headquarters.

Malaysia turns to FBI for help in plane inquiry

By Chris Buckley

The expansion of the US role came as relatives of some of the 227 missing passengers criticized the Malaysian government’s handling of the hunt.

Palestinians threaten to resume UN campaign

By Mohammed Daraghmeh

The move deepens a crisis that has threatened to derail US-led Mideast peace efforts.

Editorial & Opinion

Alex Beam

What does Alex Beam think?

By Alex Beam

The odd tic of speaking about yourself as if you were a third party.

JOAN VENNOCHI

‘Millie’ fight creates a chilling effect

By Joan Vennochi

While the past can be uncomfortable to recall, it’s better for the next generation to learn from it.

SCOT LEHIGH

DeLeo’s star is on the rise

By Scot Lehigh

As power is ebbing away from Governor Patrick and Senate President Murray, House Speaker Robert DeLeo is seeing his stature grow.

Metro

critic’s notebook

‘Millie’ flap highlights how old plays are rife with stereotypes

Wheelock Family Theatre's production of

By Don Aucoin

The uproar over the depiction of Asian-Americans in a Newton high school musical shows how dated theatrical canon can seem for modern audiences.

Worcester a model for Boston’s only vocational school

Brianna Hiscock, 17, played with Rosie at Worcester Tech’s Tufts at Tech Community Veterinary Clinic.

By Akilah Johnson

In many ways, Madison Park Technical Vocational High School is where Worcester Tech was a decade ago.

Protein may guard against Alzheimer’s disease

From left: Dr. Bruce Yankner, post-doc fellow Liviu Aron, and genetics instructor Tao Lu discuss a Western blot of the REST protein.

By Carolyn Y. Johnson

The failure of a natural system that protects brain cells may lead to Alzheimer’s disease, new research suggests.

More Stories

YVONNE ABRAHAM

On Beacon Hill, upskirting trumps education

By Yvonne Abraham

Boston

Thief sought in T-station T-shirt thefts

By Jacqueline Tempera

Business

Tech Lab

Why fix Internet oversight if it’s not broken?

By Hiawatha Bray

If the Internet must submit to a measure of political influence, I want the politicians to be people with the open-minded spirit of the Internet’s creators.

Partners to delay acquisition of South Shore Hospital

Partners HealthCare System’s proposed takeover of South Shore Hospital, which could have closed as early as Thursday, is being delayed as hospital officials negotiate with regulators.

By Robert Weisman

The acquisition is delayed as hospital officials negotiate with Attorney General Martha Coakley’s office, which has been examining the deal.

Fed cuts bond purchases by another $10b

Chairwoman Janet Yellen says the jobless rate overstates the health of the economy.

By Binyamin Appelbaum

The Federal Reserve announced it would further reduce its monthly bond purchases because of the progress of the economic recovery.

Obituaries

Martin Sweig, 92; key aide to House Speaker McCormack

Dr. Sweig in his Washington office. In retirement he moved back to the Winthrop neighborhood where he grew up.

By Bryan Marquard

Dr. Sweig, a right-hand man for South Boston Democrat John W. McCormack, was touted as “one of the most powerful men on Capitol Hill.”

Jack A. Kinzler, 94, NASA worker who saved Skylab with a parasol

By Margalit Fox

Had Jack A. Kinzler not built model planes as a boy, Skylab — the United States’ $2.5 billion space station — would very likely have been forfeit.

William Pogue, 84; record-setting astronaut

William Pogue in 1973 during flight training in Houston.

By Bart Barnes

Colonel Pogue flew around Earth for 84 days in 1973 and 1974, then setting the mark for longest spaceflight.

Sports

celtics 101, heat 96

Celtics spring upset on Heat

Avery Bradley was up, and Ray Allen down, after the Celtics guard hit a 3-pointer in the fourth quarter.

By Baxter Holmes

The Celtics broke a five-game losing streak with a win against the defending champions, who were playing without LeBron James.

On hockey

Loui Eriksson key to Bruins’ success

Loui Eriksson has helped the Bruins to a 10-game win streak.

By Fluto Shinzawa

Eriksson’s performance during the team’s 10-game win streak is in contrast to his ghostly start in Boston.

DAN SHAUGHNESSY

Expect Tommy Amaker to be next BC coach

Tommy Amaker said all the right things Wednesday, but he didn’t say he would be Harvard’s coach next season.  (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)

By Dan Shaughnessy

It’s an awkward situation with Amaker leading Harvard into the NCAA Tournament, but the BC job is a good opportunity for Amaker.

G: Style

Book Review

‘Showtime’ by Jeff Pearlman

Earvin “Magic’’ Johnson was the floor leader of the Lakers teams that won five titles in the ’80s.

By Julian Benbow

Pearlman looks at the Los Angeles Lakers teams of the 1980s that turned each NBA season into its own annual 82-game soap opera.

Boston Design Week debuts with events around the city

The master bedroom in the 1796 Otis House.

By Christopher Muther

Boston is filled with designers, and Tony Fusco of Fusco & Four wants to open up that world with the first Boston Design Week.

Some Boston Design Week events

A room in San Francisco’s Pacific Heights designed by Steven Favreau.

By Christopher Muther

A full list of Boston Design Week events can be found at www.bostondesignweek.com. Here are a few of the can’t-miss happenings.

Globe North

Lynn’s Beth Bresnahan new leader of Mass. Lottery

Beth Bresnahan, 38, shown at the lottery’s Braintree headquarters, is the new executive director of the Massachusetts State Lottery.

By Rich Fahey

Lynn native Beth Bresnahan, 38, is the second woman and youngest person to head the Massachusetts State Lottery.

Melrose

Nicotine devices find an audience

A customer browses while owner Mike Cook chats at Cumulus Vapors in Melrose.

By Alan Leo

The e-cigarette industry is booming, and north of Boston, the landscape is changing fast as entrepreneurs open or race to open stores.

Updates to Chelmsford town center approved

A historic pedestrian bridge on Forest Path, when renovated, would connect the Bruce Freeman Rail Trail to the Bartlett Woodlot and Center Village.

By Brenda J. Buote

Town leaders hope to capitalize on Center Village’s many assets and make the area a destination for both residents and visitors.

Globe South

Construction surging south of Boston

 Walden Woods in Scituate is one of the sizeable housing developments going up on the South Shore.

By Jessica Bartlett

Throughout the region, building permits are on track to exceed the previous year’s numbers.

Study says prison population pads voter tally in some districts

By Johanna Seltz

A research group is questioning whether town meetings are working as they should in communities that host prisons.

Construction to begin on Plymouth complex

An architectural rendering shows the proposed YMCA building at Redbrook.

By Emily Sweeney

Wareham-based cranberry grower A.D. Makepeace Co. is moving forward with plans to build a new village on about 2,000 acres in south Plymouth.

Globe West

Six new Newton restaurants, from large to small

Here are six new Newton restaurants, from large to small.

With more restaurants, Newton becomes a culinary hub

Del Frisco’s Grille owners opened in Chestnut Hill aware they had a customer base there.

By Scott Van Voorhis

Newton is seeing dining options that are increasing in number and range, making the city a haven for both foodies and more casual diners.

Watertown police officers running this year’s Marathon

Watertown Police Officer Andrew Civetti (left) and Sergeant Ken Delaney gear up for a training run in Framingham.

By Jaclyn Reiss

In previous years, one or two Watertown officers have run the Marathon independently. This year, a dozen are running.