Front page

The inside story of MIT and Aaron Swartz

More than a year after Swartz killed himself rather than face prosecution, questions about MIT’s handling of the hacking case persist.

South Koreans drank coffee at a Dunkin’ Donuts in Seoul. There are now more than 900 Dunkin’s in the country.
Customers enjoy coffee and other drinks while working on their computers and iPads at a Starbucks in Seoul. “At Starbucks, Koreans jumped on the bandwagon,” a professor says.

Dunkin’ Donuts jumps on Asia’s coffee craze

South Korea has transformed itself from a tea-drinking culture, and Dunkin’ is uniquely positioned to benefit from it.

Russell Crowe plays the title character in “Noah.”

critic’s notebook

‘Noah’ part of a flood of Bible-themed films

While many Christians and other believers decry modern pop culture as a swamp of secular sin, movie theaters are telling a different story.

Address

Read the Globe’s new Sunday real estate section, full of advice, profiles, essays, and more.

The body of Mya Barry was placed in a plot specially saved for babies at Pine Hill Cemetery in Quincy. She was born in April 2011 with heroin coursing through her veins. Months later, she was given heroin-tainted milk, authorities said.

Cases of newborns with addictions soaring

Little Mya Barry’s untimely death points to weaknesses in a system struggling to deal with a booming addiction to prescription and illegal drugs.

“I grew up north of Boston. Boston’s my city, so I’m not afraid,” said Jarrod Clowery of Stoneham, who suffered severe burns from in the second bomb. “I’m not going to live in fear.”

Some affected by bombing will be at race, but others won’t

For some people, returning to the Marathon is a matter of realizing a personal triumph. For others, the decision is complicated by a multitude of factors.

MLB preview section

//c.o0bg.com/rf/image_90x90/Boston/2011-2020/2014/03/31/BostonGlobe.com/Sports/Images/section-16222--90x90.JPG Red Sox ready to turn the page

Delve into our season preview, as we explore why the Red Sox are putting their trust in Xander Bogaerts and a young core.

All-Scholastics

Honoring the area’s best athletes

It’s time to toast local athletes for their achievements. Led by the Methuen wrestler Christian Monserrat, the season’s best shined bright.

The Nation

4.8m GM vehicles recalled so far in 2014

The largest among seven major GM recalls this year covers about 2.2 million vehicles in the United States, including the Chevrolet Cobalt.

By Christopher Jensen

General Motors Co. recalled about 758,000 vehicles in the United States in 2013, ninth among automakers.

GOP enacting new ballot curbs in pivotal states

Pedestrians passed voting signs near an early-voting polling site in Austin, Texas, last month. In elections beginning next week, voters in 10 states must show photo IDs.

By Steven Yaccino and Lizette Alvarez

The bills, laws, and administrative rules shake up fundamental components of state election systems.

Study backs nonsurgical method to fix heart valves

One doctor called Medtronic Inc.’s CoreValve “a great leap forward” for repairing heart valves through blood vessels.

By Marilynn Marchione

Survival rates were better one year later for people who had a new valve placed through a tube into an artery instead.

The World

Dunkin’ Donuts jumps on Asia’s coffee craze

South Koreans drank coffee at a Dunkin’ Donuts in Seoul. There are now more than 900 Dunkin’s in the country.

By Matt Viser

South Korea has transformed itself from a tea-drinking culture, and Dunkin’ is uniquely positioned to benefit from it.

New objects seen, but still no sign of jet

For relatives of passengers on the missing plane, the search drags on and the frustration grows. A relative rested near a board bearing written wishes Saturday in a Beijing hotel.

By Rob Griffith and Gillian Wong

None of the objects recovered was confirmed to be from the plane, leaving searchers with no sign of the flight three weeks after it disappeared.

Afghan vote in doubt as international observers flee

By Rod Nordland and Matthew Rosenberg

Foreigners have been leaving the country after attacks on foreign targets and the commission running the vote.

Editorial & Opinion

opinion | Candace Rondeaux

Democracy on the line

An Afghan laborer cooked a meal at a brick factory on the outskirts of Kabul in 2012.

By Candace Rondeaux

If Afghanistan can’t hold a clean election next week, the United States should leave.

FARAH STOCKMAN

A nation shaped by war — and US money

Afghan President Hamid Karzai, left, arrives with then-Kandahar Governor Gul Agha Sherzai, right, in Kandahar, Afghanistan in 2002.

By Farah Stockman

The US government has spent more than $640 billion in Afghanistan since 2001, the vast majority on security.

JOAN VENNOCHI

Crossed lines of protest, free speech at Northeastern

By Joan Vennochi

Whatever the reason behind the university’s suspension of a pro-Palestinian rights student group, speech was squelched.

More Stories

Q&A

America, the religious?

By Christopher Shea

Uncommon Knowledge

Older dads, mutant kids?

BRAINIAC

Prison art, made from bedsheets

By Kevin Hartnett

letters | the violent saga of Jared Remy

Amid hard life lessons, a reach for something transformative

letters | the violent saga of Jared Remy

When the strong lance of justice breaks

letters | public pensions under fire

It’s a problem, but don’t pin it on public workers

letters | public pensions under fire

Blame Wall St. excess, failed federal policies

letters | N.H. race renews debate

If outsiders have say in local races, money will talk

opinion | Daniel Benjamin

The EU holds the power to foil Putin’s ambitions — but will it?

By Daniel Benjamin

Opinion | Stephanie Fairyington

Are millennials hearing ‘no’ enough?

By Stephanie Fairyington

Metro

Some affected by bombing will be at race, but others won’t

“I grew up north of Boston. Boston’s my city, so I’m not afraid,” said Jarrod Clowery of Stoneham, who suffered severe burns from in the second bomb. “I’m not going to live in fear.”

By Bella English and Sarah Schweitzer

For some people, returning to the Marathon is a matter of realizing a personal triumph. For others, the decision is complicated by a multitude of factors.

The inside story of MIT and Aaron Swartz

Aaron Swartz, a brilliant young programmer and political activist, helped launch several progressive political groups and was a major force behind a national wave of protest against the Stop Online Piracy Act, which targeted unauthorized sharing of videos and music.

By Marcella Bombardieri

More than a year after Swartz killed himself rather than face prosecution, questions about MIT’s handling of the hacking case persist.

Cases of newborns with addictions soaring

The body of Mya Barry was placed in a plot specially saved for babies at Pine Hill Cemetery in Quincy. She was born in April 2011 with heroin coursing through her veins. Months later, she was given heroin-tainted milk, authorities said.

By Jenifer McKim and Michael Bottari

Little Mya Barry’s untimely death points to weaknesses in a system struggling to deal with a booming addiction to prescription and illegal drugs.

Money & Careers

Authors work to reveal hidden gender bias

Rosalind Barnett (left) and Caryl Rivers examined data for three years before writing “The New Soft War.”

By Katie Johnston

Women are still discriminated against in the workplace, Caryl Rivers and Rosalind Barnett say, but the bias has become harder to detect.

address

My painful, sweaty, scary life as a mover

Peter Keough.

By Peter Keough

For years I was a mover. My father was a mover, and his father was a mover. The company, Keough’s Express, founded in 1916, consisted of, as my father put it, a “fleet of truck.”

Ask Address ...

Spring garden tips: Rake, overseed, and prune

By Carol Stocker

Gardening columnist Carol Stocker gives her suggestions about what you can be doing in the garden now as we launch into early spring.

Sports

Red Sox place trust in their young talent

The Red Sox are counting on Xander Bogaerts, shown with Daniel Nava, to be a force for them in the lineup and at shortstop.

By Peter Abraham

The Red Sox believe that a constant infusion of youth is what builds lasting success. Fortunately for them, they’re loaded with some of MLB’s most talented young players.

Bruins 4, Capitals 2

Bruins beat Capitals as Jarome Iginla scores twice

Jarome Iginla (12) celebrated a goal with teammates in the second period.

By Fluto Shinzawa

Iginla and the Bruins took a 4-2 decision Saturday over a possible first-round opponent.

New age of NBA analytics: Advantage or overload?

Jay Wessel of the Celtics reviews the feeds from the six SportVu cameras at TD Garden.

By Baxter Holmes

With more and more statistical data becoming available, the debate continues in NBA circles as to how useful such analytics are in player evaluation.

More Stories

on second thought

Oh, Babe, another baseball season is upon us

By Kevin Paul Dupont

Christopher L. Gasper

Expect the unexpected from 2014 Red Sox

By Christopher L. Gasper

red sox notebook

Shane Victorino strains hamstring

By Peter Abraham

Spring training report | Twins 7, Red Sox 4

Red Sox drop spring finale against Twins

By Peter Abraham

Sunday Baseball Notes

Baseball’s biggest stories for 2014

By Nick Cafardo

Sunday Basketball Notes

GM never lost hope while Nets found their way

By Gary Washburn

Sunday Hockey Notes

Former Bruins linemates chasing Cup in St. Louis

By Fluto Shinzawa

Sunday Football Notes

Roger Goodell stresses more respect in NFL

By Ben Volin

bruins notebook

Reilly Smith of Bruins continues to struggle

By Fluto Shinzawa

BC 6, Denver 2

BC overpowers Denver

By Nancy Marrapese-Burrell

UMass-Lowell 2, Minnesota St. 1

UMass-Lowell keeps rolling

By John Powers

Florida 62, Dayton 52

Florida dismisses Dayton to reach Final Four

By Julian Benbow

Wisconsin 64, Arizona 63

Wisconsin bumps off Arizona to advance to Final Four

By Beth Harris

Union 3, Providence 1

Union edges Providence to reach Frozen Four

By Anthony Gulizia

Dan Shaughnessy

Xander Bogaerts looks terrific, but ...

By Dan Shaughnessy

Ideas

The internationalist

Why Putin’s Crimean move crosses the line

By Thanassis Cambanis

Since the Cold War, major powers avoided unsanctioned land grabs—until now.

Obituaries

George Bennett, 102; was treasurer at Harvard, mutual fund manager

Mr. Bennett managed investments at Harvard, where he also competed in sports as an undergraduate.

By Bryan Marquard

Mr. Bennett was president and CEO of State Street Investment Corp. and served his alma mater, Harvard University, in a variety of posts.

Amanda Dempsey, mother of ‘Grey’s Anatomy’ actor

Patrick and Amanda Dempsey during a cancer walk in 2011.

Ms. Dempsey inspired her son, actor Patrick Dempsey, to help create a cancer support organization at Central Maine Medical Center in Lewiston.

Sunday Arts

critic’s notebook

Chekhov’s work continues to resonate

Anton Chekhov.

By Don Aucoin

More than a century after Anton Chekhov’s death, his voice resounds from stages all over the Boston area.

critic’s notebook

‘Noah’ part of a flood of Bible-themed films

Russell Crowe plays the title character in “Noah.”

By Ty Burr

While many Christians and other believers decry modern pop culture as a swamp of secular sin, movie theaters are telling a different story.

art

Higgins collection finds home in WAM galleries

Preparator Patrick Brown (pictured) works on the formerly brown horse that is now a more colorful part of the Worcester Art Museum’s “Knights!” exhibit, featuring items from the recently closed Higgins Armory Museum. Included is a Batman figure borrowed from a Los Angeles car museum.

By Geoff Edgers

The Higgins Armory Museum closed Dec. 31 and come Friday, visitors to the Worcester Art Museum will encounter “Knights!”

More Stories

Summer blockbuster creep

By Mark Feeney

buzzsaw

On TV, there’s an art to a graceful exit

By Matthew Gilbert

Top Picks

More Ron Burgundy-colored outtakes

By Tom Russo

Boston-area arts letters

By June Wulff

Scene here

Spotlight on a punk Chartbuster

By Loren King

My Instagram: Modupe Sonuyi

By Christopher Muther

the one thing

A punchy floral blouse for spring

By Marni Elyse Katz

The ticket: Visual art

By Sebastian Smee

The ticket: Dance

By Karen Campbell

The ticket: Classical music

By Jeremy Eichler

The ticket: Pop music

By James Reed

The ticket: Television

By Matthew Gilbert

Names

Sam Adams assists Marathon bombing survivors

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

book review

‘The Bohemians’ by Ben Tarnoff

By James Zug

Yugoslavian-born performance artist

Marina Abramovic

book review

‘Sous Chef’ by Michael Gibney

By Kent Black

book review

‘Can’t and Won’t’ by Lydia Davis

By John Freeman

book review

‘Every Day Is For The Thief’ by Teju Cole

By Ted Weesner Jr.

the story behind the book | kate tuttle

‘Phantom Toolbooth’ creator keeps it smart

By Kate Tuttle

Seven Books About . . .

Lessons in writing

By Katharine Whittemore

the discovery

‘Sublime Nature’ by Cristina Mittermeier

By Jan Gardner

new england literary news

Poetry is in the air

By Jan Gardner

Travel

Cities in the States

Museums, zoo, biking — plenty to do in Portland, Ore.

Ride the Portland Aerial Tram or observe how other families behave at the zoo.

By Kari Bodnarchuk

This city of charming neighborhoods reflects the values of its hip young residents, especially its thriving community of active families.

New England Travel

A magical trip to Salem

Wynotts Wands has stacks of decorative boxes of their own wooden wands designed in styles appropriate for  Potter characters.

By Stephanie Ebbert

Salem has some magic amid the historic Witch City, and plenty of non-witch activities to keep everyone busy.

If you go . . .

If you go to Salem

If you go to Salem.

More Stories

new england travel

The flip side of winter: places to eat pancakes

By Patricia Harris and David Lyon

If you go . . .

If you go for pancakes

Second Look

‘Knights!’ at the Worcester Art Museum

By Ellen Albanese

On View | Mark Feeney

Matisse to El Greco to Penn in Venice

By Mark Feeney

First time, any time, Rome time memorable for all

By Diane Bair and Pamela Wright

If you go . . .

If you go to Slovenia

iF YOU GO . . .

If you go to Hakone, Japan

If you go . . .

If you go to Hacienda Xcanatun

Here, There, and Everywhere

Crane Estate adventure series to a snazzy charger

By Necee Regis

iF YOU GO . . .

If you go to Portland, Ore.

Magazine

Magazine

How the Marathon bombing manhunt really happened

Police officers guarded the entrance to Franklin Street in Watertown where there was a search for Boston Marathon bombings suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev.

By Scott Helman and Jenna Russell

In a new book, Scott Helman and Jenna Russell recount the day the city stood still.

Could Sam Sevian become the youngest US chess grandmaster ever?

International master Sam Sevian.

By Joe DePaolo

At 13, the Southbridge resident is one step away from the game’s highest title. Can he break the nation’s age record?

Perspective

How programming savvy might save us from a surveillance state

By Hiawatha Bray

Although most of the systems that track people are operated by corporations, the threat from surveillance-happy governments is most alarming.

Globe North

In Somerville, Green Line Extension means higher rents

With area rents skyrocketing in Union Square, Jordan Voelker, here with her two sons, Henrik, 5 and Roland, 2, said she knows she and her husband she may soon have to move out.

By Clennon L. King

About 67 percent of Somerville households do not own their properties, and 44 percent spend more than 30 percent of their gross household income on housing.

New housing units include space for low-income tenants

Tenants are expected to begin moving into Assembly Row in April.

By Clennon L. King

In a matter of weeks, the first wave of tenants — including some who could not afford it at market rates — will move into Somerville’s Assembly Row.

Educators give option to skip test

By Bella Travaglini

The option to skip is a sign of growing resistance to a new standardized test that could replace the MCAS.

More Stories

Who Taught You to Drive?

Picking up the pieces after an Expressway crash

By Peter DeMarco

High School Volleyball

For Lawrence, togetherness a key to success

By Joseph Saade

Dining Out

Rossetti raises the bar in Lynn

By Coco McCabe and Doug Stewart

Suburban Diary

A brush with death, and Samaritans come running

By Rob Azevedo

Burlington

Town gives new meaning to senior prom

By John Laidler

Everett

City street sweeping to begin Tuesday

By John Laidler

Medford

Council meets Tuesday on Brooks Estate

By Kathy McCabe

Melrose

School budget hearing Wednesday

By Kathy McCabe

Saugus

Town swears in 10 firefighters

By John Laidler

Somerville

City seeks tax break for residents

By Brock Parker

Tewksbury

Recycling Committee seeks new members

By John Laidler

Wakefield

Two special elections set for Tuesday

By John Laidler

Wilmington

All aboard for train club open house

By Kathy McCabe

Beverly

Endicott to offer two new PhD programs

By Steven A. Rosenberg

Gloucester

Curcuru hired as director of veterans services

By David Rattigan

Hamilton , Wenham

Town meetings slated for Saturday

By David Rattigan

Haverhill

Fire station reopens after three-month closure

By Brenda J. Buote

Lawrence

Twins, mother thankful for safe recovery

By Karen Sackowitz

Marblehead

High school senior projects to begin April 28

By Steven A. Rosenberg

Newburyport

Audubon offers training program for volunteers

By Brenda J. Buote

North Andover

State Education Department to review district

By Brenda J. Buote

Rockport

Town Meeting scheduled for Saturday

By David Rattigan

West Newbury

Budget to see 3 percent increase

By Taryn Plumb

Globe South

Lakeville voters weigh sale of land

The state Department of Conservation and Recreation wants to buy 636 acres from the town of Lakeville for preservation.

By John Laidler

A regional network of protected spaces could soon grow to include a 636-acre expanse of forest in Lakeville, if town residents agree to sell the land to the state.

Developer sought to revive Quincy downtown

Quincy’s Merchants Row project, shown last year, already has a new developer.

By Jessica Bartlett

The search is officially on for a new developer in the planned Quincy Center revitalization, after city officials ousted Street-Works Development LLC.

Plan for new school may get third vote in Hanson

By John Laidler

A proposal to build a new elementary school in Hanson that appeared to have been derailed by two Special Town Meetings may be heading back to voters.

More Stories

Private jet firm takes off

By Christie Coombs

Beverly Beckham

A life spent helping others takes a turn for the worse

By Beverly Beckham

Dining Out

Heavenly baked goods, and more

By Anne Steele

High School Volleyball

North Quincy boys’ volleyball has sizable goals this spring

By Jacob Feldman

Quincy

Neighborhood sweeping starts Monday

By Katheleen Conti

Duxbury

Kelley is new town clerk

By Jean Lang

Rockland

Civil War swap meet April 6

By Cara Bayles

Norwell

Fund-raiser puts library halfway to goal

By Juliet Pennington

Kingston

Town Meeting Saturday

By Robert Knox

Hull

Benefit concerts for Bob Simon

By Johanna Seltz

Weymouth

Volunteers wanted for herring run cleanup

By Johanna Seltz

Randolph

Community gathers to mourn loss of student

By Elaine Cushman Carroll

Plymouth

One contested race in May

By Emily Sweeney

Cohasset

Three races in local elections

By Johanna Seltz

Braintree

Arrested men found with cash, cocaine

By Dan Adams

Bridgewater

First-ever finance director to be named

By Jennette Barnes

Brockton

Town officials offer community involvement training

By Michele Morgan Bolton

Carver

Town administrator to present budget

By Robert Knox

Dedham

Baker to fill in as interim Town Manager

By Dave Eisenstadter

East Bridgewater

Patrol officers sign contract

By Rich Fahey

Easton

Time for property owners to connect

By Michele Morgan Bolton

Foxborough

Planners consider pavilion construction by Patriot Place

By Michele Morgan Bolton

Hanson

Town spring cleaning Saturday

By John Laidler

Lakeville

Selectmen enact sign policy

By Paul Kandarian

Marion

Trio of races in town election

By Paul Kandarian

Middleborough

Free training offered for disaster response team

By Michele Morgan Bolton

Norwood

Snow budget hits $1 million

By Jean Lang

Rochester

Librarian organizes town old records

By Paul Kandarian

Sharon

Votes set for new public safety building

By Jennette Barnes

Stoughton

Teachers end activity boycott

By Rich Fahey

Walpole

Iron Chef Junior cookoff April 8

By Johanna Seltz

Westwood

Selectmen honor hockey champs

By Michele Morgan Bolton

Whitman

Market to expand

By Elaine Cushman Carroll

Wareham

Town election takes place Tuesday

By Emily Sweeney

Globe West

After 10 years, Mikveh in Newton embracing new rituals

Steps lead down into the immersion pool at Mayyim Hayyim Living Waters Community Mikveh, which marks its 10th anniversary in May.

By Steve Maas

When Rabbi Emma Gottlieb immersed herself in a hot tub-size pool in Auburndale this month, she may have made mikveh history.

Newton

Newton hears how one suicidal teen chose ‘to stay alive’

By Ellen Ishkanian

A Youth Summit in Newton heard from a Canadian high school basketball champion who shared his experience of contemplating suicide.

Sudbury to vote on tax hike to build new police station

By Jennifer Fenn Lefferts

Eight years after Sudbury voters rejected a proposal for a new police station, they will have another chance to replace the outdated and cramped space.

More Stories

In Uniform

By Alice C. Elwell

High School Volleyball

Milford boys’ volleyball will not settle for second

By Phil Perry

Brookline

Public health fair in Brookline

By Brock Parker

Waltham

Gardencrest security discussion

By Jaclyn Reiss

Newton

Rotary talent show this Sunday

By Ellen Ishkanian

Arlington

Town election Saturday

By Emily Cataneo

Belmont

Presentation on the Belmont Uplands

By Emily Cataneo

Lexington

Tickets for LexVegas fund-raiser on sale

By Emily Cataneo

Lexington

Forum on downtown Lexington parking

By Emily Cataneo

Needham

NStar to test soil

By Jaclyn Reiss

Acton

Acton’s election and town meeting set for April

By Jennifer Fenn Lefferts

Berlin

Town focuses on gender income inequality

By Matt Gunderson

Littleton

Standard & Poor’s awards town top rating

By Nancy Shohet West

Westborough

Historical Society open house

By Jennifer Roach

Southborough

Main Street project meeting Wednesday

By Jennifer Roach

Lincoln

Lincoln town election to be held Monday

By Jennifer Fenn Lefferts

Northborough

Benefit 5k run/walk on Saturday

By Jennifer Roach

Acton

Cultural Council seeks names for sculpture

By Jennifer Fenn Lefferts

Carlisle

Four-part series on health

By Nancy Shohet West

Sudbury

First Parish of Sudbury holds annual rummage sale

By Jennifer Fenn Lefferts

Harvard

Baby-sitting, van offered for town meeting

By Davis Bushnell

Ayer

Hearing on surveying ponds

By Davis Bushnell

Bolton

Officials debate plan for town vault

By Matt Gunderson

Marlborough

Downtown revival in the works

By John Dyer

Stow

Candidates line up for election

By Matt Gunderson

Wayland

Wayland town meeting and election this week

By Jennifer Fenn Lefferts

Concord

Space available for rain garden tour in Concord

By Jennifer Fenn Lefferts

Shrewsbury

Book sale next weekend

By Abby Jordan

Natick

Incumbents rule at polls

By Justin A. Rice