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It will be an emotional time for Marathon Sports as the running store gets ready for race on April 21.

Wendy Maeda/Globe Staff

Marathon Sports prepares for emotional race day

The store’s proximity to the Marathon bombings has made it a powerful empathetic force.

In Revere, teacher Joe Amico guided Ashley Lemus as she took the PARCC test.

Online exam that could replace MCAS gets trial run

State education leaders are exploring the once unthinkable: a new standardized testing system, this time done almost entirely online.

Boston’s only public methadone clinic may shut

The possible closure comes at a time when heroin overdoses, which methadone is used to combat, are rising dramatically across the state.

Fred Weichel (left) was convicted of murder in the death of Robert LaMonica, who was gunned down outside his Braintree apartment.

Bulger backs a convict’s attempt for freedom

A man who has spent more than 32 years in prison for murder has found an unlikely ally: James “Whitey” Bulger.

Charlene Chow of Dorchester donned her helmet as she was departing from the Copley Square Hubway station.

Public-private funding for Hubway paying off

Hubway opened for its fourth season with a rosy financial prognosis and a fresh contract between the City of Boston and bike-share operators.

The Nation

Obama plans executive order for labor inequities

President Obama is seeking to demonstrate that he can still drive economic policy.

By Jim Kuhnhenn

President Obama’s order will bar federal contractors from retaliating against employees who discuss their pay with one another.

GOP quietly expands coverage choices in health law

Senate majority leader Harry Reid said the legislation strengthened the law.

By David Espo

The change is a striking departure from dozens of high-decibel attempts to repeal or dismember the Affordable Care Act.

Heroin users seeking treatment may hit insurance barriers

Patty DiRenzo’s son, Salvatore Marchese, died of a heroin overdose after being denied treatment in some facilities.

By Meghan Barr

Of the 23.1 million Americans who needed treatment for drugs or alcohol in 2012, only 2.5 million people received aid at a specialty facility.

The World

High turnout, low violence buoy Afghans

By Matthew Rosenberg and Jawad Sukhanyar

Afghans reveled in the apparent success of this weekend’s presidential election.

Signals may be from missing jet, official says

A helicopter made an approach to the flight deck of an Australian navy ship as the search continued Sunday.

By Kirk Semple

“Clearly this is a most promising lead,” the investigator said before adding that it might take days to confirm any connection.

Secessionists stage rally in Ukraine

Demonstrators held a rally in support of Russia near a government building in Donetsk, Ukraine, Sunday.

By Peter Leonard

Crowds of pro-Russian demonstrators stormed government buildings Sunday in several major cities.

Editorial & Opinion

opinion | Stephen Kinzer

US, Iran share a common enemy: Heroin

An American security contractor walked through an opium poppy field near Lashkar Gah in Helmand province of southern Afghanistan.

By Stephen Kinzer

The American and Iranian opiate epidemics cannot be divorced from events in Afghanistan.

opinion | Jennifer Graham

Lent an excuse, challenge for anorexics

The Rev. Gordon Reid, with Saint Clement's Episcopal Church, waited to place ash on worshipers' foreheads to mark the start of Lent.

By Jennifer Graham

For those with eating disorders, it’s a welcome cover that can’t last long enough.

editorial

Patrick’s drug ban shows need for more non-opioid painkillers

In becoming the first state to ban Zohydro, Mass. is demanding that the manufacturer first develop a more abuse-resistant version.

Metro

Online exam that could replace MCAS gets trial run

In Revere, teacher Joe Amico guided Ashley Lemus as she took the PARCC test.

By James Vaznis

State education leaders are exploring the once unthinkable: a new standardized testing system, this time done almost entirely online.

Boston’s only public methadone clinic may shut

By Brian MacQuarrie

The possible closure comes at a time when heroin overdoses, which methadone is used to combat, are rising dramatically across the state.

Bulger backs a convict’s attempt for freedom

Fred Weichel (left) was convicted of murder in the death of Robert LaMonica, who was gunned down outside his Braintree apartment.

By Shelley Murphy

A man who has spent more than 32 years in prison for murder has found an unlikely ally: James “Whitey” Bulger.

Business ǀ Science

Marathon Sports prepares for emotional race day

It will be an emotional time for Marathon Sports as the running store gets ready for race on April 21.

By Taryn Luna

The store’s proximity to the Marathon bombings has made it a powerful empathetic force.

At WPI, a push to make smart wheelchairs

Sensors in a footrest of an experimental wheelchair at WPI keep it from rolling off steps and other dropoffs.

By Michael B. Farrell

A small team is working to create a more intelligent wheelchair that employs new sensor technologies and control systems.

Drug shows promise battling breast cancer

“The magnitude of benefit we are seeing is not something commonly seen in cancer medicine studies,” said Richard S. Finn (right), with Dennis Slamon at UCLA.

By Andrew Pollack

In a clinical trial, the drug cut in half the risk that breast cancer would worsen, or progress, researchers said.

Obituaries

Carl Accardo, 85; geophysicist did key research on LEDs

Carl Accardo, shown on the rocks of Kennebunkport, Maine, also served as an liaison between MIT and Japan.

By Bryan Marquard

Mr. Accardo was only in his early 20s when he published pioneering research about the solid state phenomenon of electroluminescence.

Carl Mundy, 78; Marines chief fueled debate on women

By Matt Schudel

General Mundy’s statements on race, women and gays in the military provoked widespread criticism.

Curtis Bill Pepper, foreign correspondent and author

Curtis Bill Pepper covered events around the world for four decades.

By Dennis Hevesi

At his death, Mr. Pepper was awaiting the publication of his final book, “Happiness: Fragments of Happiness in the Lives of the Famous and Others Among Us.”

Sports

TD Garden to get a $70 million facelift

An artist’s rendering of what the TD Garden pro shop would look like after the planned renovations.

By Baxter Holmes

Beginning this summer, the multipurpose arena will undergo a privately funded renovation that is expected to finish within two years.

brewers 4, red sox 0

Red Sox fall to Brewers again

Khris Davis beat a throw to David Ross after Daniel Nava misplayed the hop on a line drive by Mark Reynolds.

By Julian Benbow

The Brewers locked down the Red Sox on Sunday and took all three games of the series at Fenway Park.

UConn 75, Stanford 56

UConn women to play Notre Dame in title game

Connecticut center Stefanie Dolson (31) celebrates against Stanford during the first half of the semifinal game in the Final Four of the NCAA women's college basketball tournament.

By Michael Vega

The undefeated Huskies, who beat Stanford, will play undefeated Notre Dame after both won on Sunday.

G: Health

Women with Turner Syndrome tell their stories

Miriam Beit-Aharon, who has Turner syndrome, with her mother, Claudette Beit-Aharon. Claudette is the editor of  a collection of coming-of-age stories by women, including her daughter, who have the syndrome, titled “Standing Tall With Turner Syndrome.”

By Alyssa Botelho

Turner Syndrome is a disorder that stunts sexual development and causes infertility in about one in every 2,500 female births.

An inventive take on Buster Keaton-inspired calamity

Foreground (from left): Yannick Greweldinger, Silke Hundertmark, and Reinier Schimmel in the ArtsEmerson production of “Lebensraum (Habitat).”

By Christopher Wallenberg

Jakop Ahlbom’s “Lebensraum (Habitat),” is a silent film-come-to-life which blends mime, illusion, and acrobatics.

Book review

‘The Empathy Exams’ by Leslie Jamison

By Kate Tuttle

Each of the 11 essays touches, in one way or another, on ideas of empathy (which implies pain, victimization, sensitivity) and voice (which implies creativity, agency, expression).

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Spelling things out, photographically

By Mark Feeney

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Hear music written for a clock

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Pentatonix hit all the right notes

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Fenway Park concession stands getting healthier

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By June Wulff

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Weekly chess column

By Harold Dondis and Chris Chase

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Capturing a moment: remembering loss and love of a city

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

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Oliver Stone speaks at local colleges

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Shakespeare company parties like it’s 1985

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‘The Whale’ and ‘The Seagull’ are well matched

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WriteBoston event honors Menino

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Celebrities spotted around town

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein