Front page

No evidence of modern forgery in ancient text mentioning ‘Jesus’ wife’

Tests strongly indicate a papyrus containing the first-known reference to Jesus’s wife is an ancient relic, not a modern forgery as some had thought.

The Mass. Pike at Allston is seen with the rail yard at left.

Jonathan Wiggs/Globe staff

Straighter Mass. Pike may dramatically redefine Allston

The $260 million project would open 60 acres, which could house a network of bike and walking paths, a Harvard expansion, or thousands of housing units.

YVONNE ABRAHAM

Drugmaker’s dual role as friend, foe

If you’re inclined to be cynical about the pharmaceutical industry, the company behind Zohydro is your Exhibit A.

Signal missed on Tamerlan Tsarnaev

Russian officials’ warnings to the FBI and CIA apparently failed to raise alarms when Tsarnaev formally sought the name of an early Islamic scholar.

Patrick looks to eliminate tech noncompete agreements

Such agreements are “a barrier to innovation in Massachusetts,” said Governor Deval Patrick’s housing and economic development secretary.

Data faulted, Brigham study on heart cells is withdrawn

The retraction comes just a week after a Japanese scientist was accused of fabricating data in a major stem cell paper that was led by a different Brigham scientist.

The Nation

21 students hurt in knife attack at Pa. school

Alex Hribal, 16, was charged with four counts of attempted homicide and 21 counts of aggravated assault.

By Kevin Begos

A 16-year-old rampaged through the crowded halls of his high school before an assistant principal tackled him.

Review questions effectiveness of anti-viral flu drugs

A review found that, compared with a placebo, Tamiflu shortened the duration of flu symptoms by a little less than a day on average — from 7 to 6.3 days — but led to more side effects.

By Deborah Kotz

A new review of clinical trial data finds that the drugs do not reduce flu-related hospitalizations or serious complications.

Pakistan market bombed; 22 die

The attack coincided with government efforts to negotiate a peace deal with the Taliban.

By Salman Masood

A powerful explosion killed at least 22 people and injured about 100 in the deadliest attack in the Pakistani capital in more than five years.

The World

Putin may seek early payment for Ukraine gas

By Vladimir Isachenkov and Peter Leonard

Russian President Vladimir Putin’s move was designed to exert economic pressure as Ukraine confronts a possible bankruptcy.

Pings raising hopes of finding missing flight

By Nick Perry

The head of the search for the missing Malaysia Airlines plane said Wednesday he believes the hunt is closing in on the ‘‘final resting place’’ of Flight 370.

25 killed, 100 injured as 2 bombs explode on a busy Syrian street

By Albert Aji and Bassem Mroue

The blasts hit a commercial street inhabited mostly by members of President Bashar Assad’s minority Alawite sect.

Editorial & Opinion

Alex Beam

The known known

Errol Morris watches Donald Rumsfeld, subject of “The Known Unknown,” on screen.

By Alex Beam

Errol Morris’s new film, “The Known Unknown,” flogs Donald Rumsfeld, an easy target.

NICHOLAS BURNS

Playing to Putin’s end game

Deputies clash during a session of the Ukrainian parliament in Kiev April 8.

By Nicholas Burns

Showing some backbone on Ukraine now is the surest way for the United States to protect NATO’s position in Eastern Europe.

JOAN VENNOCHI

Bush Sr.’s profile of some courage

Former president George Bush, pictured here in 1996, promised he wouldn’t raise taxes during a 1988 debate with Michael Dukakis —  but he did anyway.

By Joan Vennochi

If the decision to break the no-tax promise was a testament to political courage, making it in the first place was the essence of political expedience.

Metro

Straighter Mass. Pike may dramatically redefine Allston

The Mass. Pike at Allston is seen with the rail yard at left.

By Martine Powers

The $260 million project would open 60 acres, which could house a network of bike and walking paths, a Harvard expansion, or thousands of housing units.

Data faulted, Brigham study on heart cells is withdrawn

By Carolyn Y. Johnson

The retraction comes just a week after a Japanese scientist was accused of fabricating data in a major stem cell paper that was led by a different Brigham scientist.

Signal missed on Tamerlan Tsarnaev

Tamerlan Tsarnaev, who was killed in a shootout several days after the April 15 attacks, signed an immigration form on Jan. 23, 2013 seeking to change his name to “Muaz,” according to a government official.

By Matt Viser and Bryan Bender

Russian officials’ warnings to the FBI and CIA apparently failed to raise alarms when Tsarnaev formally sought the name of an early Islamic scholar.

More Stories

Data

30 Mass. doctors split up $45 million from Medicare

By Liz Kowalczyk and Andrew Tran

Mass. House unveils $36.2 billion budget

By Michael Levenson and Joshua Miller

YVONNE ABRAHAM

Drugmaker’s dual role as friend, foe

By Yvonne Abraham

More than 30 displaced in East Boston blaze

By Jeremy C. Fox and Travis Andersen

BOSTON

Two people stabbed at Dorchester barber shop

By Jacqueline Tempera

Business

Patrick looks to eliminate tech noncompete agreements

Noncompete agreements are “a barrier to innovation in Massachusetts,” said Governor Deval Patrick’s housing and economic development secretary.

By Callum Borchers and Michael B. Farrell

Such agreements are “a barrier to innovation in Massachusetts,” said Governor Deval Patrick’s housing and economic development secretary.

Watertown company helps keep power on

Doble runs tests at its Watertown labs on items such as copper windings to help utilities improve equipment.

By Erin Ailworth

Doble Engineering Co. helps utilities assure that the power comes on when you need it.

Tech Lab

‘Heartbleed’ Internet security bug is as bad as it sounds

By Hiawatha Bray

In the wake of “Heartbleed,” a new Internet bug, consumers need to be ready to upgrade their own security practices.

Obituaries

Wrestling star Ultimate Warrior; at 54

 The Ultimate Warrior had a falling out with the WWE about money and did not appear on its television shows after July 8, 1996, until last weekend (above, in New Orleans).

By Dan Gelston

Warrior personified the larger-than-life characters who helped skyrocket the WWF into a mainstream phenomenon.

Sports

RED SOX 4, RANGERS 2

David Ortiz’s homer rallies Red Sox to win

David Ortiz launches a three-run homer down the right-field line to erase a 2-1 deficit in the eighth inning. Jessica Rinaldi/Globe Staff

By Julian Benbow

Ortiz’s three-run blast in the eighth inning erased a 2-1 deficit and allowed the Sox to win the series from Texas.

Hawks 105, Celtics 97

Celtics squander another late lead

Celtics guard Avery Bradley, who scored a game-high 24 points, couldn’t get this shot past Atlanta’s Paul Millsap.

By Gary Washburn

The Celtics held a 9-point lead with under 6 minutes remaining, but fell apart at the end.

on baseball

Now Red Sox must deal with Jacoby Ellsbury

The Red Sox miss their former leadoff hitter, Jacoby Ellsbury, who is batting third with the Yankees.

By Nick Cafardo

The Sox know Ellsbury’s strengths and weaknesses, but it still won’t be easy to contain him. And he’s off to a hot start for the Yankees.

G: Style

Stage REview

Whistler’s closing act is a surreal ‘Far Away’

Becca A. Lewis (front) and Lorna Nogueira in Whistler in the Dark Theatre’s “Far Away.”

By Terry Byrne

The always imaginative Whistler in the Dark Theatre company has chosen this unsettling Caryl Churchill one-act as its swan song.

Book REview

‘Why Government Fails So Often’ by Peter H. Schuck

Peter H. Schuck.

By Glenn Altschuler

The self-described “militant moderate” attributes the crisis of government confidence to dysfunction in Congress and poor performance of the government.

Five ways to freshen your home for spring

Tom Scheerer at the Boston Design Center.

By Jill Radsken

Interior decorator Tom Scheerer offers easy changes, each of which requires modest sweat equity and costs next to nothing.

More Stories

Bargain Bin

Spring Fling in Marblehead includes sales

By Ami Albernaz

Ask Martha

A growing interest in succulents

By Martha Stewart

events

Boston-area to do list

By June Wulff

The week ahead: Nightlife

By Milva DiDomizio

Mark your calendar

By June Wulff

Handyman on Call

How can they get adhesive off of granite?

By Peter Hotton

Hillary Clinton book to be released June 10

By Ken Thomas and Hillel Italie

Names

A casting call for ‘Black Mass’

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

Dianna Agron films ‘Tumbledown’ in Westford

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

Former Patriot Brandon Spikes tweets ‘4 years a slave’

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

Ecotone celebrates ‘Risk and Abandon’ at Doyle’s

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

James Patterson money brings Norbert to first-graders

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

DJ Tracy Young gets her hair done before Cher show

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

Hilltop cows find new home

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

Aerosmith ready to play

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Globe North

Looking back on 50 years of G.I. Joe at Wenham Museum

Brothers Xavier (left) and Deacon Parsons of Salem study the Wenham Museum’s G.I. Joe display.

By Wendy Killeen

“I had that when I was a kid,” said Jared Ward, pointing to one of the many G.I. Joe action figures on display at the Wenham Museum.

Winchester retiree health costs revisited

By Kathy McCabe

Winchester selectmen have scaled back a controversial plan to make retirees pay half the cost of their health insurance premiums.

Danvers

Ground broken for St. John’s expansion

An artist’s rendering of the high school academic building to be built on the St. John’s Prep campus in Danvers.

By Kathy McCabe

St. John’s Prep is constructing a $22.1 million high school academic building, a step in the boys’ Catholic high school’s plan to open a middle school.

Globe South

Braintree’s last farm poised for sale

Don Del Pico stands in front of a shuttered building on the family’s poultry farm in Braintree, which is slated for new housing.

By Dan Adams

From its founding in 1954, Roland Del Pico’s poultry farm seemed an indelible patch of rural life in an encroaching sea of suburbia.

Revival of train service sought

By Jennette Barnes

A retired train engineer’s push to return weekend and holiday commuter rail to the Greenbush and Kingston/Plymouth lines is gaining attention.

Graveyards in region abound in history, lore

The Vine Hills Oak Grove Cemetery in Plymouth includes this marker for Edward Grenville Davis, who died in 1869 at age 9.

By Johanna Seltz

Some of the region’s most fascinating people can be found in the graveyards south of Boston.

Globe West

Young college grads, doing it their way

Dan Ustayev, a 2012 Babson graduate, has seen his dream of running a restaurant flourish; his second Los Amigos is now open in Newton.

By Emily Sweeney

As college grads face the unpleasant task of finding a job in a tough economic market, some are forgoing traditional entry-level jobs and forging their own paths.

Dozens cited for recycling violations

By Jennette Barnes

A five-fold increase in state inspections has revealed that more than 80 businesses and institutions improperly disposed of a substantial amount of recyclables.

Tough Ruck crew will run the Battle Road trail this year

Tough Ruck organizer Steve Fiola preparing for this year’s trek.

By Brock Parker

For the past six years, Steve Fiola has hoisted the load of more than 35 pounds on his back and marched the Boston Marathon.