Front page

Welding business sued over fatal Back Bay fire

The owner of the building destroyed by a fire that killed two firefighters says the welding company was responsible for the blaze.

BU coach Kelly Greenberg out after bullying accusations

Greenberg’s exit comes after a university committee reviewed complaints of abuse lodged by former players.

Coakley lawsuit wants college’s ex-chief to repay millions

The former president of a Falmouth college allegedly squandered millions on excessive pay, and even a quarter-million-dollar timeshare.

At the East Bay Food Pantry in Bristol, R.I., people waited in line this month.

Wendy Maeda/Globe Staff

Middle class eroding, gap widening in Bristol, R.I.

Bristol is a community of extremes, home to both great wealth and a shrinking middle class as more residents slip closer to poverty.

Around the Internet, password fatigue is setting in.

Around Internet, password fatigue setting in

In the wake of recent security breaches, taking serious precautions still seems unnecessary and just too much work for some users.

The Nation

Justices uphold ban by voters on use of race in admissions

‘This case is not about how the debate about racial preferences should be resolved. It is about who may resolve it,’ wrote Justice Anthony Kennedy.

By Adam Liptak

The fractured decision revealed deep divisions over what role the judiciary should play in protecting racial and ethnic minorities.

US policy tightens control over leaks

By Eileen Sullivan

The Obama administration has tightened its control over intelligence by setting limits on officials’ interactions with the media.

Lack of oversight blamed in Texas chemical explosion

The 2013 blast at a chemical fertilizer plant in West, Texas, killed 14 people and injured more than 200 others.

By Manny Fernandez

A report highlighted a series of shortcomings, both in how the West Fertilizer Co. handled an agricultural chemical and in how various agencies oversaw operations.

The World

Biden offers support to Ukraine, rebukes Russia

By Andrew Higgins

Vowing that the United States would never recognize Russia’s “illegal occupation” of Crimea, Vice President Joe Biden reiterated America’s support of Ukraine.

Outspoken critic of Putin facing another trial, prison

Alexei Navalny is set to face trial again Thursday. He has been under house arrest for  almost two months.

By Nataliya Vasilyeva

A Moscow judge left open the possibility of jailing President Vladimir Putin’s main critic for years, a sign of Putin’s increasingly hard-line rule against opponents.

Koreans deep in grief over ferry toll

South Korean Coast Guard ships and other craft took part in recovery operations Tuesday at the site of the ferry sinking, near the island of Jindo. About 190 people are still missing.

By Gillian Wong

For a moment there is silence in the tent where bodies from the ferry disaster are brought for identification. Then the anguished cries begin.

Editorial & Opinion

OPINION | Roderick MacLeish and Stephen Delinsky

Mental illness not a crime; why treat it that way?

By Roderick MacLeish and Stephen Delinsky

In Massachusetts, many with schizophrenia are locked up in barren cells, bound and alone. If it happened anywhere else, we’d call it torture.

SCOT LEHIGH

A former rep’s Rx for Congress

By Scot Lehigh

At a time when many political scientists favor strong parties, Mickey Edwards, former Republican congressman from Oklahoma, has a contrary view.

Editorial

Hold the search: McDonough is best chief for city’s schools

Interim superintendent John McDonough has what no outside candidate can bring: A deep institutional knowledge of the system and its unique mission.

Metro

Coakley lawsuit wants college’s ex-chief to repay millions

During Robert Gee’s tenure, the college he headed bought an ocean-view compound.

By Walter V. Robinson

The former president of a Falmouth college allegedly squandered millions on excessive pay, and even a quarter-million-dollar timeshare.

Welding business sued over fatal Back Bay fire

The nine-alarm blaze in the Back Bay left two firefighters trapped inside the burning building despite frantic rescue efforts.

By Maria Cramer and John R. Ellement

The owner of the building destroyed by a fire that killed two firefighters says the welding company was responsible for the blaze.

Mass. limits use of the potent painkiller Zohydro

By Milton J. Valencia

Governor Patrick’s administration imposed sweeping restrictions just before a ban on the controversial drug was set to expire.

Business

Supreme Court expresses skepticism on Aereo

Aereo CEO Chet Kanojia (left) left the US Supreme Court after oral arguments.

By Tracy Jan

If Aereo withstands copyright law challenges from the traditional TV networks, it could transform the way many people watch network programs.

Middle class eroding, gap widening in Bristol, R.I.

At the East Bay Food Pantry in Bristol, R.I., people waited in line this month.

By Megan Woolhouse

Bristol is a community of extremes, home to both great wealth and a shrinking middle class as more residents slip closer to poverty.

Novartis deals could affect Mass. drug research

By Robert Weisman

With Novartis and GlaxoSmithKline swapping vaccines and cancer drug franchises, the Cambridge research landscape could be altered.

Sports

BU coach Kelly Greenberg out after bullying accusations

Kelly Greenberg had received a contract extension before allegations against her caused divisions at Boston University.

By Bob Hohler

Greenberg’s exit comes after a university committee reviewed complaints of abuse lodged by former players.

Bruins 3, Red Wings 0

Bruins beat Red Wings, take 2-1 series lead

The Bruins’ Jordan Caron beat Red Wings goalie Jimmy Howard in the first period to put Boston ahead 2-0.

By Amalie Benjamin

Dougie Hamilton and Jordan Caron had first-period goals for Boston and Patrice Bergeron added a late empty-netter.

On hockey

Bruins are imposing their will on Red Wings

Tuukka Rask accepted kudos after shutting out the Red Wings in Game 3.

By Fluto Shinzawa

The Bruins can beat opponents any way they want — physical, skilled, grinding, up-tempo, tactical.

G: Food

For restaurant owners, striking the right noise level is key

 The Painted Burro in Somerville made two major changes to improve noise levels: It moved the location of the bar and added soundproofing under the tables and chairs and to the ceiling and walls (painted with images).

By Peggy Hernandez

In sampling the decibel levels at several local restaurants, we determine where conversation might be a challenge — and what owners are doing about noise.

Dining Out

At M.C. Spiedo, Italian Renaissance is lost in translation

The market cart of appetizers, including deviled eggs.

By Devra First

The amount of explanation required by servers is the first indication that this Boston restaurant’s concept may be folly.

Q&A

Jeffrey Katz on the sound of a well-designed restaurant

Jeffrey Katz with his wife, Cheryl, who run the restaurant design firm C&J Katz Studio.

By Michael Floreak

Jeffrey Katz, of C&J Katz Studio, says the sound of a well-designed restaurant is like a party — “not a loud party, but a nice, lively party.”

More Stories

Cheap Eats

At Goods JP, sandwiches with special relish

By Catherine Smart

Book Review

‘The People’s Platform’ by Astra Taylor

By Hiawatha Bray

A Tank Away

Newburyport offers charm, and then some

By Diane Bair and Pamela Wright

events

Boston-area to do list

By June Wulff

Names

Boston Calling announces lineup

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

The MFA wants you to name these dogs

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

Gisele Bundchen sings for UNICEF

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

Jay Leno to give commencement address at Emerson

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

A frosty beverage for Marathon winners

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein