Front page

In portrait of late artist Jon Imber, life and love endure

A one-hour film chronicles the career, remarkable family life, and the late creative flowering of a renowned Somerville artist diagnosed with ALS.

A safari group got a close-up look at some wildlife in the Enashiva preserve.

Watertown safari company accused of exploitation

Thomson Safaris denies charges it illegally obtained land in Tanzania, beat villagers, and burned down homes.

FDA looks to regulate electronic cigarettes

E-cigarettes are battery-powered devices that heat up nicotine-laced liquid, turning it into a vapor the user inhales.

Frank Franklin II/Associated Press/File

The move would begin to place restrictions on the nearly $2 billion a year e-cigarette industry.

After an alleged assault in Allston, a selfless rescuer

A woman in her 20s threw herself on a helpless victim who was allegedly being beaten by two former college football players.

The Nation

FDA looks to regulate electronic cigarettes

E-cigarettes are battery-powered devices that heat up nicotine-laced liquid, turning it into a vapor the user inhales.

By Brady Dennis

The move would begin to place restrictions on the nearly $2 billion a year e-cigarette industry.

Justice Department to consider wide clemency

By Matt Apuzzo

It represents the Obama administration’s latest break from the criminal justice policies created to fight drugs.

Justices void $3.4 million child pornography award

By Adam Liptak

That figure was too much, Justice Anthony M. Kennedy wrote for a five-justice majority, returning the case to the lower courts.

The World

Palestinian rivals form unity government

Fatah official Azzam al-Ahmad (left) and Hamas leaders Ismail Haneiya and Moussa Abu Marzouk joined hands in Gaza.

By Ruth Eglash and Anne Gearan

Rival Palestinian political factions announced a surprise reconciliation deal, upending peace talks with Israel.

Hope is fading in S. Korea ferry disaster

South Koreans prayed Wednesday in Ansan for the safe return of missing passengers aboard the sunken ferry.

By Choe Sang-Hun

Officials say 152 people, the vast majority of them students, were missing and presumed dead.

Syrian activists accuse military of chlorine attacks

By ZEINA KARAM

Syria flatly denied the allegations, and the claims haven’t been confirmed by any foreign country or international organization.

Editorial & Opinion

NICHOLAS BURNS

Obama’s longer-term foreign policy challenges

President Obama with China’s president, Xi Jinping, in The Hague on March 24 for a nuclear security summit.

By Nicholas Burns

With two and one half years left in his presidency, Barack Obama finds a series of daunting global crises filling his Oval Office in-box.

JOAN VENNOCHI

More candor please, Senator Warren

Elizabeth Warren

By Joan Vennochi

Senator Elizabeth Warren’s continued refusal to acknowledge the significance of identifying herself as a minority as a law professor is disingenuous.

Alex Beam

Writing is bad for your wealth

By Alex Beam

“There’s no money in books,” my father said. All my life I have wondered: How did he know?

Metro

After an alleged assault in Allston, a selfless rescuer

Craig “CJ” Parsons, (left) and Anthony Varrichione (right) are accused in the beating.

By Evan Allen and John R. Ellement

A woman in her 20s threw herself on a helpless victim who was allegedly being beaten by two former college football players.

In portrait of late artist Jon Imber, life and love endure

By Sebastian Smee

A one-hour film chronicles the career, remarkable family life, and the late creative flowering of a renowned Somerville artist diagnosed with ALS.

Scott Brown’s candidacy could hurt Charlie Baker

Scott Brown’s entrance into New Hampshire’s US Senate race has created a political and media firestorm that some analysts believe will damage critical underpinnings of Charlie Baker’s gubernatorial candidacy in Massachusetts.

By Frank Phillips

Many of the party resources that would have been showered on Baker’s race for governor will now be directed at Brown’s challenge to Jeanne Shaheen.

Business

Watertown safari company accused of exploitation

A safari group got a close-up look at some wildlife in the Enashiva preserve.

By Katie Johnston

Thomson Safaris denies charges it illegally obtained land in Tanzania, beat villagers, and burned down homes.

Dublin retailer to open store at former Filene’s site

Primark plans to open a 70,000-square-foot store late in 2015 at a location once occupied by Filene’s in Downtown Crossing.

By Megan Woolhouse and Chris Reidy

Primark plans to open a 70,000-square-foot store late in 2015 at a location once occupied by Filene’s in Downtown Crossing.

Wegmans to open in Chestnut Hill on Sunday

Christine Clement took cheese bread ouf of the oven at the new Chestnut Hill Wegmans store.

By Taryn Luna

The doors of the much anticipated Wegmans supermarket on Route 9 officially open at 7 a.m Sunday.

Obituaries

David Burke, 78; former Ted Kennedy chief of staff

Mr. Burke avoided seeking the spotlight despite the powerful roles assumed.

By Bryan Marquard

Mr. Burke, of Charlestown, also served in top roles at ABC News before becoming president of CBS News.

Conrado Marrero, 102; oldest living ex-MLB player

Conrado Marrero posed with the Indians’ bat boy Owen McGinty, 12, in Cleveland. Mr. Marrero was a 1951 All-Star.

By Peter Orsi

Mr. Marrero was a the diminutive Cuban right-hander who pitched for the Washington Senators in the 1950s.

Mark Shand, 62; brother of Duchess of Cornwall

Mr. Shand was chairman of an elephant conservation charity and was known for his work as a travel writer and conservationist.

Sports

Red Sox 5, Yankees 1

John Lackey leads Red Sox past Yankees

Boston Red Sox starting pitcher John Lackey gets a hand as he enters the Sox dugout after eight strong innings.

By Peter Abraham

Lackey worked eight innings of one-run ball and shined in a game where the talk was about the Yankees ejected starter, Michael Pineda.

Christopher L. Gasper

What a foolish mistake by Michael Pineda

Umpire Gerry Davis eventually found the foreign substance on the neck of Yankees pitcher Michael Pineda. Elise Amendola/Associated Press

By Christopher L. Gasper

Pineda’s crime isn’t using pine tar, it’s using it so blatantly that the Red Sox were forced to say something.

Dougie Hamilton faring well in glare of NHL

Dougie Hamilton’s goal in Game 3 helped the Bruins pounce on the Red Wings.

By Amalie Benjamin

Not yet 21, Hamilton is under a constant spotlight that few of his peers can understand. But he’s finding a way to succeed with the Bruins.

G: Style

Balance training moves to high-end gyms

Nawal Ilyas, 27, works on core and balance in an exercise class at Equinox health club in the Back Bay.

By Beth Teitell

Stability used to be something only the elderly worried about. But now, athletes of all ages are working on balance to improve performance.

Television Review

In ‘Black Box,’ a bipolar doc with a cure for what ails everyone else

Kelly Reilly stars as bipolar neuroscientist Dr. Catherine Black, who tackles cases and her tough psychiatrist, in ABC’s new procedural, “Black Box.”

By Matthew Gilbert

Kelly Reilly is a sturdy lead, but ABC’s new drama is a mixed bag for fans of good TV.

Television Review

Barely a passing grade for ‘Bad Teacher’

In a new CBS comedy, Ari Graynor stars as a newly divorced trophy wife who tries to trick faculty and students into believing she’s a teacher.

By Sarah Rodman

“Bad Teacher” is a mediocre new CBS comedy adapted from the 2011 Cameron Diaz film.

Globe North

Estimated median rent in some of the largest communities north of Boston in February 2014

By Katheleen Conti

Estimated median rent in some of the largest communities north of Boston in February 2014 (and change from February 2013)

salem

After years of planning, Salem senior center breaks ground

By Steven A. Rosenberg

After decades of research, planning, and acrimonious debate, workers broke ground earlier this month on a new Salem Senior Center.

Communities joining forces to fight opiates

By John Laidler

Amid intensifying statewide concern about a surge in overdoses and deaths, five municipal coalitions are preparing to take fresh aim at opiate addiction.

Globe South

In suburbs, rents soar as vacancy rates plummet

Phil Ragusa, the owner of Boston Premier Properties in Quincy, showed a rental unit to Sarah Dunphy, a UMass Boston student.

By Katheleen Conti

Landlords are charging record high rents from Chelsea to Needham to Cohasset as many eschew Boston’s rental landscape for suburban alternatives.

South suburbs sharing in $542m water loans

By Jennette Barnes

Repair of leaking sewer pipes and upgrades at wastewater treatment plants are among 80 water quality projects.

Sharon

Granddaughter keeps Holocaust stories in mind

By Johanna Seltz

Eva Reisner has Alzheimer’s and cannot remember that her parents and three brothers died in a Nazi concentration camp.

Globe West

Estimated median rent in some of the largest communities west of Boston in February 2014

By Globe Staf

Estimated median rents in some of the area’s largest communities in February, and the figure’s change from February 2013.

In Lowell, rafters brave springtime rapids on Concord River

A Concord River rafting trip in Lowell turns into a white-water blur, with a Zoar Outdoor guide retrieving a paddler who bounced out going through a set of rapids.

By Jose Martinez

Lowell is not exactly synonymous with white-water rafting but every spring, the Concord River swells enough to carry thrill seekers.

Concord’s Andrews goes the distance in his first Marathon

Concord’s Tyler Andrews at the Boston Marathon Monday.

By Maggie Quick

During his first Boston Marathon, Tyler Andrews finished 29th in the men’s field and 35th overall with a time of 2:21:33.