Celtics Live

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3rd Quarter 9:05

Bruins Live

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1st Intermission

Front page

FDA e-cigarette plan brings complaints from both sides

The proposal would bring e-cigarettes and their ingredients under the agency’s review for the first time.

Patrice Bergeron has been a stalwart for the Bruins since joining the team in 2003.

For Patrice Bergeron, hockey was ‘always’ a passion

Now a candidate for the NHL MVP award, Patrice Bergeron’s impressive portfolio continues to increase, as does his value to the Bruins.

At Ward 8, a drink called the Moscow Mule is served in a copper mug that gets stolen quite a bit.

At the bar, they’re taking more than a drink

With the increasing popularity of craft cocktails, people are stealing the quirky mugs and glasses they are served in.

Andrea Lavigne told an interviewer about her baby’s death earlier this month.

WCVB

Warning missed before Grafton baby’s death

Social workers overlooked a police officer’s faxed complaint for six days, and when a social worker finally investigated, she learned that the baby had died.

Alcina Araujo, who said she was hit hard by the TelexFree bankruptcy, met with attorney Alexander Wall in Chelsea.

TelexFree sends alleged victims parting shot

The company regulators allege ran a Ponzi scheme sent out tax forms claiming to have paid investors money they say they never received.

The Nation

Army Reserve, Guard suicides rose last year

By Lolita C. Baldor

The overall totals give some hope that prevention programs may be taking hold, but raise questions about if citizen soldiers have the same access.

Mitch McConnell said job comment out of context

Senator Mitch McConnell said his comment that creating jobs in Kentucky is “not my job” was taken out of context.

By Adam Beam

Senator McConnell told a local newspaper that it is ‘‘not my job’’ to bring employment to a struggling Kentucky county were taken out of context.

Obama officials developing teacher training rating system

By Motoko Rich

The programs, the administration said, aim to make teachers accountable for their graduates’ classroom performance.

The World

Ukraine threatens blockade in pro-Russia east

A pro-Russian militant checked a car at a checkpoint on the outskirts of Slovyansk, Ukraine, Friday.

By Andrew Higgins, C.J. Chivers and Alan Cowell

The declarations reflected heightened worries that the government’s efforts to move against forces aligned with Moscow would trigger a Russian incursion.

Obama says N. Korea not easily solved

By Chico Harlan

With North Korea making potential preparations for another nuclear test, President Obama said Friday the weapons program poses a ‘‘direct threat’’ to the US.

Pope John Paul II’s aide defends moves

Visitors in Rome posed with photos of Pope John Paul II  and Pope John XXIII. They will be declared saints Sunday.

By Nicole Winfield

Pope John Paul II’s biographer said he didn’t grasp the scale of the sex-abuse scandal until very late in his papacy.

Editorial & Opinion

LAWRENCE HARMON

Mayor Walsh’s solid start

Richard Paris, president of Boston Firefighters Local 718, presented Mayor Martin Walsh the gift of a baseball bat at a graduation ceremony for firefighters in February. The two recently hammered out a firefighters contract without need of an arbitrator.

By Lawrence Harmon

Martin J. Walsh has shown himself to be a stand-up steward of public funds during his first 100 or so days in office.

opinon | noah guiney

Has IT come of age politically?

By Noah Guiney

Did the IT industry’s unexpected political activism mark its emergence onto the Commonwealth’s political scene?

opinion | geoffrey h. lewis

Time for an Obama peace plan in Mideast

By Geoffrey H. Lewis

President Obama should set forth a plan of his own for resolving the Israeli/Palestinian conflict. He should do so immediately before there is further deterioration on the ground.

Metro

FDA e-cigarette plan brings complaints from both sides

Steve Halligan, a pack-a-day smoker, tries out some sample flavors at Vape Daddy’s in Newton. At first skeptical, he left the store after buying two blends.

By Eric Moskowitz

The proposal would bring e-cigarettes and their ingredients under the agency’s review for the first time.

Warning missed before Grafton baby’s death

Andrea Lavigne told an interviewer about her baby’s death earlier this month.

By Patricia Wen

Social workers overlooked a police officer’s faxed complaint for six days, and when a social worker finally investigated, she learned that the baby had died.

Walsh taps Lottery financial officer to become Boston’s budget czar

David Sweeney was named Boston’s chief financial officer on Friday, April 25, 2014.

By John R. Ellement

Mayor Walsh announced that David Sweeney will become the city’s chief financial officer, which also includes the title of collector-treasurer.

Business

TelexFree sends alleged victims parting shot

Alcina Araujo, who said she was hit hard by the TelexFree bankruptcy, met with attorney Alexander Wall in Chelsea.

By Beth Healy and Maria Sacchetti

The company regulators allege ran a Ponzi scheme sent out tax forms claiming to have paid investors money they say they never received.

Anonymous attack on Children’s Hospital continues

By Michael B. Farrell

Boston Children’s Hospital experienced a cyber attack Friday, even though some members of Anonymous called for its end.

State Street to lay off 400 employees, 145 in Mass.

The bank’s state workforcehas dropped from 12,000 in early 2013 to 11,300.

By Beth Healy

The Boston-based financial services giant announced the job cuts as it reported a 22 percent drop in its first-quarter net income.

Obituaries

Earl Morrall, 79; Super Bowl winning quarterback

Earl Morrall was sacked by the Patriots’ Jim Hunt in 1970. The quarterback replaced an injured Johnny Unitas to help the Colts win Super Bowl V in 1971. Below, the two in 1969.

By Steven Wine

Mr. Morrall was a key member of the Miami Dolphins’ 1972 team, the only team to finish without a loss and win the Super Bowl.

Adrianne Wadewitz, 37; prolific Wikipedia editor

By Noam Cohen

Dr. Wadewitz was a scholar of 18th-century British literature who became one of the most influential editors of the online encyclopedia.

Hamish Maxwell, 87; former CEO of Philip Morris

By Hiroko Tabuchi

Mr. Maxwell arranged for acquisitions of food companies in the 1980s that turned Philip Morris into a consumer products colossus.

Sports

For Patrice Bergeron, hockey was ‘always’ a passion

Patrice Bergeron has been a stalwart for the Bruins since joining the team in 2003.

By Kevin Paul Dupont

Now a candidate for the NHL MVP award, Patrice Bergeron’s impressive portfolio continues to increase, as does his value to the Bruins.

Kevin Paul Dupont

Jarome Iginla relishing Bruins’ playoff run

Jarome Iginla scored the overtime winner for the Bruins on Thursday.

By Kevin Paul Dupont

Iginla has been a near-perfect addition to the Bruins’ lineup, and his experience and skills are paying off in the series vs. Detroit.

RED SOX 8, BLUE JAYS 1

Red Sox rebound with rout of Blue Jays

Third baseman Will Middlebrooks applies the tag as the Blue Jays’ Jose Bautista is thrown out trying to steal in the fourth inning. (Photo by Tom Szczerbowski/Getty Images)

By Peter Abraham

Toronto starter Mark Buehrle had allowed just two runs all season entering the game, but gave up seven on Friday.

G: Family

Grimy broken clock turns out to be rare gem

 Michael Finn with a rare 19th-century clock at E.B. Horn Co.

By James H. Burnett III

For years, employees and customers at E.B. Horn ignored a tarnished and dusty old clock sitting behind the counter of the venerable jeweler.

From the Archives

College life in the Boston area

September 8, 1964: Freshman girls discussed Northeastern University with their “senior hostess” in her room at the new Frank Palmer Speare Residence Hall for Women, which opened to 400 coeds.

By Thea Breite and Lisa Tuite

As high school seniors make decisions about which college to attend in the fall, we take a look at the college life of decades past.

Book REview

‘Frog Music’ by Emma Donoghue

“Frog Music,” Emma Donoghue’s follow-up to her acclaimed novel “Room,” is set in San Francisco in 1876 and populated with characters all drawn from real people.

By Laura Collins-Hughes

“Frog Music” is the author’s first novel since she vaulted to a new literary level in 2010 with the rapturously received “Room.”