Front page

Diversity low in educator courses at Mass. colleges

The lack of racial diversity among teachers can be traced to an insufficient number of people of color enrolling in educator programs.

Firearms for sale at a gun show in Barre, Vt., in February.

Drugs-for-guns traffic troubles police in Mass., Vt.

Narcotics from Massachusetts are getting ferried to Vermont and swapped for guns that are plentiful and cheap.

Suffolk professors fear evaluations could erode tenure

Suffolk University will require all tenured faculty to undergo performance reviews that in some cases could lead to dismissal.

Over three years serving together in Congress, Shaheen and Brown never argued, true, but they also almost never agreed.

Jeanne Shaheen, Scott Brown rarely interacted in Senate

The unusually cool relationship across the partisan divide helps explain why the N.H. Senate race has quickly turned bitter.

Crowds filled St. Peter’s Square and spilled across Rome Sunday as Pope Francis elevated john XXIII and John Paul II to sainthood, the first time two popes have been canonized together.

Franco Origlia/Getty Images

Popes John XXIII, John Paul II become saints

Pope Francis elevated to sainthood John XXIII and John Paul II in a ceremony bearing themes of hope and reconciliation.

Los Angeles Clippers owner Donald Sterling with V. Stiviano, to whom racist remarks were allegedly directed.

Words linked to Clippers’ Donald Sterling drawing outcry

President Obama even weighed in on what he called the “incredibly offensive racist statements” that the Clippers owner allegedly made.

The Nation

Jeanne Shaheen, Scott Brown rarely interacted in Senate

Over three years serving together in Congress, Shaheen and Brown never argued, true, but they also almost never agreed.

By Matt Viser

The unusually cool relationship across the partisan divide helps explain why the N.H. Senate race has quickly turned bitter.

Justices ponder police searches of cellphones with no warrant

By Adam Liptak

It’s a major test of how to interpret the Fourth Amendment in the digital age.

Tornado kills 2 in northeastern Oklahoma

A severe thunderstorm hit near Baldwin City, Kan., part of a powerful storm front that moved eastward on Sunday.

A tornado killed two people in the small Oklahoma town of Quapaw on Sunday, one of several twisters spawned by a large storm front moving through the Midwest and South.

The World

Popes John XXIII, John Paul II become saints

Crowds filled St. Peter’s Square and spilled across Rome Sunday as Pope Francis elevated john XXIII and John Paul II to sainthood, the first time two popes have been canonized together.

By Jim Yardley

Pope Francis elevated to sainthood John XXIII and John Paul II in a ceremony bearing themes of hope and reconciliation.

Captive observer freed in Ukraine city; 7 still held

Vyachislav Ponomaryov, the self-proclaimed mayor of Slovyansk (third from left), was flanked by the foreign military observers in his custody as they spoke to journalists.

By C.J. Chivers

The detainees held a press conference under the watch of armed guards earlier Sunday.

Abbas calls Holocaust ‘most heinous crime’

By Josef Federman

President Mahmoud Abbas’s comments appeared to be aimed at the public, but Israeli prime minister Benjamin Netanyahu brushed them aside.

Editorial & Opinion

JOHN E. SUNUNU

Sloppy planning led to student loan crisis

By John E. Sununu

The request to scale back certain loan-forgiveness programs may sound cold-hearted, but it’s a problem of the White House’s own doing.

opinion | daniel benjamin

Terror takes a hit in Yemen

By extending economic aid to civilians, the US is gaining support in the fight against militants.

By Daniel Benjamin

Yemen, as demonstrated by the counterterrorism strikes that killed more than 50 militants earlier in the week, is a little-reported success story.

JAMES CARROLL

South Korean ferry disaster and us

By James Carroll

The ferry tragedy offers a parallel to what Americans see: an elite that looks out for itself, with no regard for the welfare of the rest of those aboard.

Metro

Drugs-for-guns traffic troubles police in Mass., Vt.

Firearms for sale at a gun show in Barre, Vt., in February.

By Brian MacQuarrie

Narcotics from Massachusetts are getting ferried to Vermont and swapped for guns that are plentiful and cheap.

Suffolk professors worry new policies erode protection for tenured faculty

By Matt Rocheleau

Suffolk University, taking aim at academia’s hallowed practice of providing lifelong job protection for veteran instructors, will require all tenured faculty to undergo performance reviews.

Diversity low in educator courses at Mass. colleges

By James Vaznis

The lack of racial diversity among teachers can be traced to an insufficient number of people of color enrolling in educator programs.

Business ǀ Science

Amid new technologies, TV is at a turning point

In this photo illustration, Aereo.com, a web service that provides television shows online, is shown on an MacBook Air.

By Hiawatha Bray

As new devices and business models reshape what we view and how we view it, a massive industry-wide upheaval is in the making.

Nanomedicine could improve surgical implants

Tom Webster, a chemical engineer at Northeastern, examined bone cancer cells at a school research center.

By Callum Borchers

Nanomedicine technology offers promise in helping lower the risk of infections from surgical implants.

Riding a wave of support to clean up the ocean

By Lauren Daley

A Massachusetts native and two colleagues from the Northeast have a novel way to turn ocean pollution into something useful: recycling fishing nets into hip skateboards.

Obituaries

Spencer Bean, 38; double-lung transplant recipient

Spencer Bean

By Bryan Marquard

When Mr. Bean underwent a living donor double-lung transplant in 1996, the surgery was so new that no one could venture odds for long-term survival.

Douglas L. Coleman, 82; found a genetic cause of obesity

Beginning in the 1960s, Dr. Coleman’s research showed that a blood-borne substance could curb hunger.

By Lawrence K. Altman

Beginning in the 1960s, Dr. Coleman’s research showed that a blood-borne substance could curb hunger.

John Shirley-Quirk, 82; bass-baritone for whom Britten wrote many parts

By Margalit Fox

Mr. Shirley-Quirk, a British chemistry teacher, almost by accident became a world-renowned bass-baritone.

Sports

Kevin Paul Dupont

Bruins’ confidence now may be unrivaled

The Canadiens won three of four regular-season matchups with the Bruins this season.

By Kevin Paul Dupont

Historically, the Canadiens have had the Bruins’ number in the playoffs, but Boston is confident, talented, and on a roll.

blue jays 7, red sox 1

Red Sox fall to Blue Jays in series finale

Jon Lester allowed four runs on five hits in seven innings.

By Peter Abraham

The Red Sox were limited offensively and committed costly defensive mistakes in a 7-1 loss. Jon Lester gave up four runs on five hits in seven innings.

On baseball

Growing pains will happen for Xander Bogaerts

Shortstop Xander Bogaerts has impressed teammates with the work he’s done trying to improve defensively. Abelimages/Getty Images

By Nick Cafardo

Red Sox veterans are invested in the progress of the phenom shortstop and will both protect him and kick him in the pants if he needs it.

G: Health

Mass. General exhibit honors a pioneer of nursing education

Warren and Lucia Prosperi with the portrait of Linda Richards that Warren painted with Lucia’s assistance for Massachusetts General Hospital.

By Jeremy C. Fox

Linda Richards helped transform the nursing profession. A new exhibit at Massachusetts General Hospital highlights her accomplishments.

In Practice

In Practice: Illness and silver linings

By Dr. Suzanne Koven

The clouds of illness and disability come, not infrequently, with silver linings.

Daily Dose

Rise in measles prompts warning for doctors to learn to recognize symptoms

By Deborah Kotz

With measles cases increasing in the United States, doctors are advised to brush up on the signs of the highly contagious virus. Most younger physicians have never seen a case firsthand.

More Stories

Health Answers

Health Answers: What is brown fat?

By Courtney Humphries

Music Review

Boston Camerata at Old West Church

By David Weininger

Music Review

With Mahler, up above the mountains

By Jeremy Eichler

Book Review

‘Border Insecurity’ by Sylvia Longmire

By Jesse Singal

Events

Boston-area to do list

By June Wulff

Chess Notes

Weekly chess column

By Harold Dondis and Chris Chase

Names

Newburyport fest honors Andre Dubus III

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

Having a great time supporting teen artists at the Greatest Party

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

Tom Hardy knew Batman, and Ben Affleck is no Batman

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

New award -- and cousins -- for Doris Kearns Goodwin

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

Bill Cosby’s Penn pride

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Celebrity News

Stars have their say