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Greeters add friendly welcome to forbidding City Hall

Mayor Martin Walsh has taken a page from Walmart and the Apple Store in assisting constituents at the city’s headquarters.

Video

Siblings from Ethiopia give sick N.H. teen a chance for a cure

Behaylu Barry’s diagnosis of a life-threatening disease set off a mission that reunited him with his brother and sister.

Three members of the BSO met with members of the Chinese orchestra who had played with them in 1979.

Back after 35 years, BSO gets warm welcome in China

Thursday’s concert in Beijing marked the Boston Symphony Orchestra’s return to China after its visit in 1979.

//c.o0bg.com/rf/image_90x90/Boston/2011-2020/2014/05/02/BostonGlobe.com/Metro/Images/anthony150-12963.jpg DCF failed to protect Lynn baby, report says

The Office of the Child Advocate said the child welfare agency should have taken the infant and his twin into protective custody.

Dana Bolger has become an activist after sharing her experience filing a complaint at Amherst College after an attack.

Drew Angerer for The Boston Globe

Students’ efforts put campus sex assaults into spotlight

Advocates believe searing accounts from victims are helping to fuel the intense scrutiny that colleges now face.

The Nation

John Boehner set to appoint select Benghazi panel

“These revelations compel the House to take every possible action to ensure the American people have the truth,” Speaker John Boehner said.

By Bradley Klapper

The House speaker said officials had misled the people after the 2012 assault that left four Americans dead.

Obama, ‘troubled’ by flawed Okla. execution, calls for review

Clayton Lockett died in a botched  lethal injection.

By David S. Joachim

President Obama said the botched procedure added to other concerns he had about the way capital punishment is conducted.

Minn. teen plotted massacre, police say

The 17-year-old planned to kill his family, set a fire to divert first responders, then go to his school with bombs and guns, according to court documents.

The World

Back after 35 years, BSO gets warm welcome in China

Three members of the BSO met with members of the Chinese orchestra who had played with them in 1979.

By Jeremy Eichler

Thursday’s concert in Beijing marked the Boston Symphony Orchestra’s return to China after its visit in 1979.

Ukrainian troops launch attack on rebel-held city

A protester threw a petrol bomb at a trade union building in the previously calm port city of Odessa, on the Black Sea.

By C.J. Chivers and Noah Sneider

Military and police forces pushed armed separatists from Slovyansk’s outskirts with armored vehicles, helicopters, and ground troops.

Landslide kills 350 in Afghanistan

The mountainous area in Badakhshan province has experienced days of heavy rain, and the side of a cliff collapsed Friday.

By Amir Shah and Rahim Faiez

Authorities said more than 2,000 people are missing after heavy rain triggered the deadly landslide.

Editorial & Opinion

RENÉE LOTH

The agony of the feet

A pair of Christian Louboutins were set out for the client of a personal shopper at Saks Fifth Avenue.

By Renée Loth

To get that Carrie Bradshaw look, women are having their toes shortened, their joints sliced, or pads of fat added under the skin.

LAWRENCE HARMON

Park and wreck in Boston

By Lawrence Harmon

Why is Boston Common shabby while parks such as the Public Garden thrive?

JOAN WICKERSHAM

Savoring bits of unwise wisdom

By Joan Wickersham

They’re the irrational burrs that stick and turn out to be useful at odd moments when you somehow can’t get hold of Plato or the Dalai Lama.

Metro

DCF failed to protect Lynn baby, report says

Chase Gideika was three months old when he was allegedly murdered in July by Anthony Gideika.

By Peter Schworm

The Office of the Child Advocate said the child welfare agency should have taken the infant and his twin into protective custody.

Students’ efforts put campus sex assaults into spotlight

Dana Bolger has become an activist after sharing her experience filing a complaint at Amherst College after an attack.

By Marcella Bombardieri

Advocates believe searing accounts from victims are helping to fuel the intense scrutiny that colleges now face.

Siblings from Ethiopia give sick N.H. teen a chance for a cure

Behaylu Barry tickled his sister’s feet. His parents arranged for his biological siblings, Eden and Rediat (background) to be tested as possible matches.

By Eric Moskowitz

Behaylu Barry’s diagnosis of a life-threatening disease set off a mission that reunited him with his brother and sister.

More Stories

Arraignment for alleged killer of woman canceled

By Evan Allen and John R. Ellement

Tsarnaev lawyers ask judge to investigate alleged leaks in case

By Milton J. Valencia and Travis Andersen

BOSTON

Man is killed in Mattapan shooting

By Juan Esteban Cajigas Jimenez

Business

US to create gas reserves for New England, Northeast

By Erin Ailworth

The government will open two reserves — one near New York Harbor, and one in New England — to guard against fuel shortages.

New high-tech sculpture will light Dudley Square

Preliminary designs for the Signal Spire sculpture that will be located outside the newly renovated Ferdinand Building.

By Casey Ross

The 40-foot interactive sculpture is designed to bring a burst of light and technology to the rapidly changing area.

Job market showing stronger growth

A help wanted sign on the door of a gas station in Encinitas, Calif.

By Deirdre Fernandes

Employers added 288,000 jobs last month, spread across various industries, the Labor Department reported.

Obituaries

Al Feldstein, 88; editor of Mad magazine

Mr. Feldstein saw Mad magazine’s sales flourish, topping 2 million in the early 1970s, but not everyone was amused.

By Matthew Brown

Mr. Feldstein, in 28 years as editor, transformed the satirical publication into a pop culture institution.

Bassem Sabry, 31; Egyptian democracy blogger

Fluent in both English and Arabic, Mr. Sabry wrote the blog ‘‘An Arab Citizen.’’

By Maggie Michael

Mr. Sabry chronicled the country’s turmoil since the 2011 uprising that ousted autocrat Hosni Mubarak.

Anthony Marriott, 83; cowrote beloved British theater farce

Wendy Padbury, Timothy Ackroyd, and Ian Masters in a 1987 production of “No Sex Please, We’re British.”

By Emily Langer

Mr. Marriott dismayed critics and delighted theatergoers with ‘‘No Sex Please, We’re British.’’

Sports

Red Sox 7, Athletics 1

Dustin Pedroia, Red Sox rock A’s

Dustin Pedroia hit a grand slam in the sixth inning against the A’s.

By Peter Abraham

The second baseman’s grand slam in the sixth inning lifted the Sox to a win Friday at Fenway Park.

GARY WASHBURN

Real fans would cheer hockey’s progress in diversity

P.K. Subban was the man of the hour after scoring in double OT — then he was a Twitter target. Photo by Jared Wickerham/Getty Images

By Gary Washburn

The hateful tweets toward P.K. Subban unmasked not only a pocket of racism but also an ugly double standard.

Bruins condemn racist comments directed at P.K. Subban

Canadiens defenseman P.K. Subban was the target of racist comments on social media following his Game 1 heroics.

By Amalie Benjamin

Coach Claude Julien said the team does not associate with people like those who sent the tweets.

G: Family

A Lost Girl shares her story

Yar Ayuel at her home in Arlington.

By Bella English

Most know the story of the “Lost Boys,” but an Arlington woman will recount her saga of loss, survival, and flight from Sudan on the world stage.

From the Archives

One for the record books

By Leanne Burden Seidel and Lisa Tuite

Throughout the years, there have been numerous attempts to be in record books for a variety of talents.

Dance Review

Alvin Ailey’s body language at the Wang

Members of Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater perform “LIFT,” choreographed by Aszure Barton.

By Jeffrey Gantz

Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater stretched itself in pieces by Wayne McGregor, Bill T. Jones, and Aszure Barton.