Front page

Max Pacioretty scored in the second period to put the Canadiens ahead 2-0.

Canadiens 3, Bruins 1

Bruins KO’d by Canadiens in Game 7

The Bruins ended their season with a 3-1 loss to their most bitter rival on home ice after being up in the series, 3-2.

Boston Ma10/11/2012 Shawn Drumgold (cq) meets with media after his bench trial. Shawn Drumgold (cq) was acquitted of drug charges by judge who cited Boston Police Investigation, not Annie Dookhan. Section: Metro: Boston Globe Staff/Photographer Jonathan Wiggs :Reporter: Slug:

Wrongful conviction lawsuit settled for $5m

Shawn Drumgold spent 15 years in prison after being convicted in the 1988 murder of a 12-year-old Roxbury girl.

Scientists from Harvard University have discovered brain circuits in mice that control parental behavior.

Brain circuits may control parental behavior

Turning mice into good parents was as simple as shining a light to trigger specific brain cells.

State lags in testing for causes of deaths

The wait time is making it difficult for relatives to collect insurance benefits and close out estates.

Barbara Walters pioneered an interview style that steered away from issues and into human frailties. Her subjects have ranged from Cuba’s Fidel Castro (above) to recent newsmaker V. Stiviano, Donald Sterling’s companion.

ABC Photo Archives

Critic’s Notebook

It’s sign-off time for TV legend Barbara Walters

As many celebrate her legacy, it’s important to remember that it’s a mixed bag.

Devotees want the joys of reading such poets as Edgar Allan Poe, Emily Dickinson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, and Robert Frost to endure.

Poetry lovers fear its role in schools is in decline

Critics of new national education goals fear that poetry will become an endangered pursuit.

The Nation

CDC backs daily pill to help prevent AIDS infection

Adam Zeboski, an activist with the San Francisco AIDS Foundation, took a dose of Truvada, a antiretroviral shown to prevent new HIV infections.

By Donald G. McNeil Jr.

The move could transform AIDS prevention efforts in the US, away from a reliance on condoms.

Consumers losing doctors with new insurance plans

By Kelli Kennedy

Some consumers who bought insurance under the Affordable Care Act are experiencing buyer’s remorse.

9/11 museum offers sights and sounds of tragedy

Above, visitors looked over artifacts from the 9/11 attack on the World Trade Center. Below, handmade posters of victims sought by families and friends.

The National September 11 Memorial Museum opens this week deep beneath ground zero, 12½ years after the terrorist attacks.

The World

Tensions rise amid Turkish mine blast

Rescuers carried out the body of a miner Wednesday. The official death toll from the disaster rose to 274.

By Sebnem Arsu and Alan Cowell

Victims’ families demanded answers in what is emerging as perhaps the worst industrial accident in the country’s history.

After battle, Nigerian troops fire on commanding officer

A demonstration demanding the release of the schoolgirls held by Islamic militants was held Wednesday in Lagos, Nigeria. Many such events have taken place since the abductions.

Soldiers said the troops fired at a senior officer who came to pay respects to fallen comrades.

Ukraine talks open without separatist presence

By David M. Herszenhorn

Initial remarks by senior Ukrainian officials suggested little compromise by the provisional Ukrainian government.

Editorial & Opinion

Jason Warner and Jacob Zenn

After kidnappings, Nigeria must step up

Students who escaped from Boko Haram kidnappers arrive at the Borno Government House to identify their classmates shown in a video released by Boko Haram.

By Jason Warner

The domestic landscape in Nigeria may open up new channels for cooperation against Boko Haram.

JOAN VENNOCHI

Steve Crosby should resign from Gaming Commission

Massachusetts Gaming Commission chair Stephen Crosby.

By Joan Vennochi

Crosby must go, because of a perceived conflict of interest. Everyone knows it, even Deval Patrick.

ALEX BEAM

Mack the life, and maybe a film

Harvard professor Dr. John Mack died in 2004.

By Alex Beam

A filmmaker wants to make a movie about the Harvard psychiatrist who studied alien abductions.

Metro

Poetry lovers fear its role in schools is in decline

Devotees want the joys of reading such poets as Edgar Allan Poe, Emily Dickinson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, and Robert Frost to endure.

By Kathleen Burge and Maggie Quick

Critics of new national education goals fear that poetry will become an endangered pursuit.

Wrongful conviction lawsuit settled for $5m

Boston Ma10/11/2012 Shawn Drumgold (cq) meets with media after his bench trial. Shawn Drumgold (cq) was acquitted of drug charges by judge who cited Boston Police Investigation, not Annie Dookhan. Section: Metro: Boston Globe Staff/Photographer Jonathan Wiggs :Reporter: Slug:

By John R. Ellement

Shawn Drumgold spent 15 years in prison after being convicted in the 1988 murder of a 12-year-old Roxbury girl.

State lags in testing for causes of deaths

By Matt Rocheleau

The wait time is making it difficult for relatives to collect insurance benefits and close out estates.

More Stories

FBI intimidated Tsarnaev friends, defense lawyers say

By Patricia Wen and John R. Ellement

Business

Panel supports Lahey emergency room expansion

By Priyanka Dayal McCluskey

The Public Health Council approval clears the way for the $76 million project in Burlington to move forward.

Mass. hospital profits rose last year, report says

By Robert Weisman

While overall profitability rose last year, 11 out of 64 hospitals lost money, reflecting financial strain on some community hospitals.

Tech Lab

A rising tide of Internet regulation

By Hiawatha Bray

Around the world, regulators and judges are tightening their grip on the Internet, with predictable results: chaos and confusion.

Obituaries

Jack Curtin, 82, of Cambridge; mainstay of road races

John M. Curtin of Cambridge did not run his first road race until he was 47. He would go on to complete 35 marathons, including the Boston Marathon 15 times.

By Peter DeMarco

Mr. Curtin, who ran his first race at 47, went on to complete more than 1,000 races in his lifetime, including 35 marathons.

Malik Bendjelloul, 36; directed ‘Sugar Man’ movie

Malik Bendjelloul won the Oscar for best documentary in 2013 with his debut feature, “Searching for Sugar Man.’’

By Bruce Weber

Mr. Bendjelloul was a Swedish filmmaker who won the 2013 Academy Award for best documentary with his debut feature, “Searching for Sugar Man.”

Robert Stuart, 98; politically active Quaker Oats heir

By Laurence Arnold

Mr. Stuart led the company for 15 years and ignited the America First movement against US intervention in what became World War II.

Sports

Canadiens 3, Bruins 1

Bruins KO’d by Canadiens in Game 7

Max Pacioretty scored in the second period to put the Canadiens ahead 2-0.

By Amalie Benjamin

The Bruins ended their season with a 3-1 loss to their most bitter rival on home ice after being up in the series, 3-2.

CHRISTOPHER L. GASPER

Zdeno Chara’s troubles led way for Bruins

Zdeno Chara and the Bruins lost in Game 7 to the Canadiens.

By Christopher L. Gasper

Chara is the catalyst for the Bruins, and when he is off-kilter (as he was in this series), so are the Spoked-Bs.

DAN SHAUGHNESSY

What a painful exit for Bruins

Milan Lucic was flexing his muscles in Game 5, but with 4:31 left in the third period of Game 7, he and the Bruins were powerless to stop the Canadiens.

By Dan Shaughnessy

It was shocking, out of character, and totally unexpected. And it will go down as one of the worst moments in franchise history.

More Stories

Red Sox 9, Twins 4

Red Sox cruise past Twins

By Peter Abraham

BRUINS NOTEBOOK

Milan Lucic, Dale Weise in spat over handshake

By Amalie Benjamin

CANADIENS NOTEBOOK

P.K. Subban wants respect for Canadiens

By Nancy Marrapese-Burrell

CANADIENS NOTEBOOK

P.K. Subban calls for respect

By Nancy Marrapese-Burrell

Red Sox notebook

Craig Breslow returning to form

By Peter Abraham

THE WEEK IN GOLF

Week in golf: Ex-Open champs missing at Pinehurst

By Michael Whitmer

NEW ENGLAND GOLF NOTEBOOK

More locals take step toward US Open

By Michael Whitmer

G: Style

Kevin Kearns finds strength in helping others

Client Tara Mardigan works out with trainer Kevin Kearns at Sityodtong Muay Thai Academy in Somerville.

By Christopher Muther

Kearns turned a childhood of bullying into a career of training UFC contenders.

Critic’s Notebook

It’s sign-off time for TV legend Barbara Walters

Barbara Walters pioneered an interview style that steered away from issues and into human frailties. Her subjects have ranged from Cuba’s Fidel Castro (above) to recent newsmaker V. Stiviano, Donald Sterling’s companion.

By Matthew Gilbert

As many celebrate her legacy, it’s important to remember that it’s a mixed bag.

Movie Review

In ‘Godzilla,’ San Francisco is in for a big surprise

By Tom Russo

This latest bid to Hollywoodize a uniquely Japanese icon is an uneven spectacle that can’t sustain its solid first-half character moments.

More Stories

Book Review

‘Michael Jordan’ by Roland Lazenby

By Colin Fleming

Boston-area to do list

By June Wulff

The week ahead: Nightlife

By Milva DiDomizio

Mark your calendar

By June Wulff

Handyman on Call

What to do about the gaps between floorboards?

By Peter Hotton

Names

Johnny Depp starts work as ‘Whitey’

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

Jimmy Page buys vinyl in Boston

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

Gwyneth Paltrow, Chiwetel Ejiofor filming in Boston?

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

Curt Schilling gets a film cameo

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Globe North

Local-access cable shows are sharpening their focus

Joe Lynch hosts the show “Greater Somerville,” one of the most popular cable programs on Somerville Community Access Television.

By Steven A. Rosenberg

It has been 42 years since a landmark decision by the Federal Communications Commission created public access channels.

Lynn

Retaliation lawsuit set to go to trial

By Alan Leo

Lynn’s former comptroller is bringing a whistleblower lawsuit against the city and the man who fired him.

‘Pirate’ radio dots the suburbs

By Katheleen Conti

Shutdown of three unlicensed community radio stations last month providing programming to ethnically diverse neighborhoods underscored the prevalence of so-called “pirate radio.”

More Stories

Suburban Diary

Karma comes back to bite him in the ankle

By Rob Azevedo

Globe North Best Bets

By Milva DiDomizio

North Reading

Yard waste collection Saturday

By Brenda J. Buote

Somerville

City hosts ‘Weekend of Play’

By Cara Hogan

Wilmington

World Series trophy at Middle School

By Brenda J. Buote

Chelmsford

UMass Lowell student honored by state

By Brenda J. Buote

Dracut

Owner of Foxco bicycle shop to move on

By Karen Sackowitz

Groveland

Dunn prevails in four-way race for selectman

By David Rattigan

Merrimac

Blanchard takes School Committee seat

By David Rattigan

Swampscott

Spathanas, Dreeben take two selectmen seats

By David Rattigan

Globe South

Legislators take tour to learn how constituents think

By Cara Bayles

A field trip of the Joint Committee on Community Development and Small Businesses was part of a larger listening tour.

Appeal of 3 Kingston turbines rejected by judge

By Robert Knox

A challenge to the legality of the three wind turbines on Mary O’Donnell’s Kingston property has been dismissed.

Hanson

Hanson weighs new uses for old county hospital site

The former Plymouth County Hospital in Hanson has sat idle for more than two decades, and is a safety hazard because of damage by vandalism, fires, and general decay.

By John Laidler

The Plymouth County Hospital closed its doors in 1992, and the once busy complex in Hanson sits idle and decaying.

Globe West

Concord remembers Nathaniel Hawthorne

Nathaniel Hawthorne

By Jennifer Fenn Lefferts

Nathaniel Hawthorne is among Concord’s most famous authors but one local literary scholar thinks the 19th century American novelist often takes the back seat.

Grants to help keep bicyclists, pedestrians safe

By John Laidler

Drivers who ignore pedestrians at crosswalks and bicyclists who zip through red lights could find themselves more likely to get pulled over.

Events honor 150th anniversary of Nathaniel Hawthorne’s death

Events are scheduled in honor of the 15oth anniversary of Hawthorne’s death: