Front page

Firms put climate change into their business plans

Some businesses in Boston and beyond are preparing for a world in which weather and climate could threaten property, operations, and earnings.

Exposure threats e-mailed to Sharon rabbi

A series of e-mails between Rabbi Barry Starr and a Milton man shows the hardball tactics the alleged extortionist used.

Outside contractors working on the Longfellow Bridge are getting an education in 19th-century engineering.

Contractors take Longfellow Bridge to the past

Workers on the Longfellow Bridge reconstruction project are getting an education on the obsolete construction practices of yore.

Jens Stenger demonstrated a color difference between a faded Rothko mural and a compensating projection.

David Ryan/Globe Staff

Harvard’s Rothko murals to be seen in new light

A revolutionary and controversial invention will allow the Harvard Art Museums to show the packed-away murals again.

Interim Superintendent John McDonough greeted Shallily Baez on a tour of the Haynes Early Education Center in Dorchester earlier this month.

Boston schools chief insists on interim status

In his 11 months as interim school superintendent, John McDonough has impressed parents, educators, and civic leaders.

The Nation

Mitch McConnell wins GOP Kentucky primary

Senate GOP leader Mitch McConnell and his wife, Elaine Chao, greeted backers following his win in Kentucky’s primary.

By David Espo

The Senate Republican leader dispatched his Tea Party-backed challenger with ease.

As military steps in with martial law decree, Thais test new limits

Antigovernment protests continued Tuesday in Bangkok in apparent defiance of the army chief’s military decree.

By Thomas Fuller

Thousands of anti-government protesters ignored the declaration, dancing and singing in the oppressive Bangkok heat.

Barron likely to be confirmed to appeals court

If confirmed by the Senate, David Barron would get a lifetime appointment to an appeals court with jurisdiction over Massachusetts, Maine, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and Puerto Rico.

By Noah Bierman

Harvard professor David Barron’s role in justifying the killing of US citizens overseas has drawn scrutiny.

The World

China sees US hypocrisy in snooping on foreign firms

By David E. Sanger

Every example of NSA spying on corporations around the world is becoming Exhibit A in China’s argument that the US is giving new meaning to capitalistic hypocrisy.

Police: 2 bomb blasts in Nigeria kill at least 118

By Ahmed Saka

There was no immediate claim of responsibility for the twin car bombs, but they bore the hallmarks of Boko Haram, an Islamic extremist group.

Pro-Russian rebels in Ukraine face citizen anger

Employees of the Ilyich Iron and Steel Works protested the  actions of armed separatists in Mariupol on Tuesday.

Anger and dismay over Ukraine’s eastern turmoil gained strength Tuesday, but pro-Russian rebels who have declared the region independent vowed defiance.

Editorial & Opinion

SCOT LEHIGH

Gay marriage: A look back after 10 years

Truro residents Eileen Counihan,48, and her partner Erin Golden,45, outside Provincetown Town Hall after obtaining their marriage license May 17, 2004.

By Scot Lehigh

It was an intense, emotionally charged, multi-year struggle, but in the end, this state got it right.

JEFF JACOBY

How political insiders control the ballot

Michigan Representative John Conyers, serving his 25th term, was disqualified from the Democratic primary ballot.

By Jeff Jacoby

Politicians and their cronies are inventive in keeping people and propositions off the ballot.

RENÉE LOTH

Trigger warnings: A dangerous idea on campus

By Renée Loth

To slap a blanket warning on a piece of literature is a short step from an effective ban.

Metro

Contractors take Longfellow Bridge to the past

Outside contractors working on the Longfellow Bridge are getting an education in 19th-century engineering.

By Martine Powers

Workers on the Longfellow Bridge reconstruction project are getting an education on the obsolete construction practices of yore.

Exposure threats e-mailed to Sharon rabbi

Barry Starr was photographed at his home May 9.

By David Abel and Ellen Ishkanian

A series of e-mails between Rabbi Barry Starr and a Milton man shows the hardball tactics the alleged extortionist used.

Boston schools chief insists on interim status

Interim Superintendent John McDonough greeted Shallily Baez on a tour of the Haynes Early Education Center in Dorchester earlier this month.

By James Vaznis

In his 11 months as interim school superintendent, John McDonough has impressed parents, educators, and civic leaders.

Business

Firms put climate change into their business plans

Developers have moved electrical units from the basements to rooftops of buildings in the Seaport District along Boston Harbor.

By Deirdre Fernandes

Some businesses in Boston and beyond are preparing for a world in which weather and climate could threaten property, operations, and earnings.

Postal union targets Staples over mail services program

At top, unionized Postal Service workers demonstrated outside a Staples store in New York in April. Above, a postal services center at a Steples in Worcester.

By Taryn Luna

A deal between the United States Postal Service and Staples Inc. has blown up into a major confrontation between the USPS and its main union.

TelexFree co-owner to stay in custody until trial

By Beth Healy

The Marlborough-based firm has been charged with fraud in what investigators have called a $1 billion pyramid scheme.

Obituaries

Radu Florescu, 88; historian added flesh to Dracula myth

Professors Radu Florescu (left) and Ray McNally collaborated on books on Dracula and Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. The two taught at Boston College.

By Bryan Marquard

Dr. Florescu, a professor emeritus of history at Boston College, used his academic scholarship to illuminate the historical origins of popular myths.

Arthur Gelb, 90; critic and editor who shaped the Times

By Sam Roberts

Mr. Gelb dominated the newsroom at the New York Times for decades by sheer force of personality.

Viktor Sukhodrev, 81; was legendary Soviet interpreter

Mr. Sukhodrev was the Soviet interpreter who for three decades brought the words of Kremlin leaders to the English-speaking world.

Sports

Celtics disappointed but not surprised with lottery

Boston Celtics co-owner and managing partner Stephen Pagliuca was hoping for a better result, but he still managed to smile after the NBA draft lottery.

By Gary Washburn

With pick No. 6, Danny Ainge said it’s unlikely the Celtics can draft someone who can “change the face of our franchise out of the gate.”

Inside the NBA Draft lottery room

 Cavaliers GM David Griffin holds a lucky bow tie after Cleveland won the draft lottery.

By Baxter Holmes

The Celtics must settle for the No. 6 pick in the NBA Draft while Cleveland, which had just a 1.7 percent chance, scored the coveted slot.

blue jays 7, red sox 4

Red Sox’ skid continues

Catcher David Ross and Felix Doubront couldn’t get their heads together during Juan Nieves’s fifth-inning mound visit.

By Peter Abraham

Felix Doubront lasted only four innings as the Red Sox lost their fifth straight.

G: Food

Paula Marcoux’s ‘Cooking With Fire’ spans history

Paula Marcoux (top) prepares the ingredients for her version of borek (which originated in Anatolia) that she calls “campfire baklava.” After she has rolled out the dough, she hangs it over her hand to stretch it before filling it, here with a mixture of feta cheese, parsley, farmer cheese, and garlic (other ones will have chopped nuts and sugar inside), and then bakes them over a fire.

By Lisa Zwirn

The Plimoth Plantation veteran experimented with ways to cook with fire that span cultures, ingredients, and primitive setups.

Harvard’s Rothko murals to be seen in new light

Jens Stenger demonstrated a color difference between a faded Rothko mural and a compensating projection.

By Geoff Edgers

A revolutionary and controversial invention will allow the Harvard Art Museums to show the packed-away murals again.

Recipe for sea scallop lollipops

A skewer sticking out of one end of the scallops makes the rounds look like lollipops.

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At The Merchant, excellence is elusive

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Book Review

‘The Possibilities’ by Kaui Hart Hemmings

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A Tank Away

Jamestown, R.I.: An escape from hustle and bustle

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Boston-area to do list

By June Wulff

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Awash in pink for a good cause

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Harvard’s ‘Skip’ Gates picks up Peabody

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The Theater Offensive celebrates 25 years

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Sarah Sze honored by the School of the Museum of Fine Arts

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Bobby Brown’s secret talent: sauces and seasonings

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Will Middlebrooks is a Good Sport

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