Front page

John L. Allen Jr.

Second UN panel criticizes Vatican on sex abuse

The panel cited several specific cases, including Father Joseph Palanivel Jeyapaul, a priest who returned to his native India after being charged with molesting a 14-year-old girl in Minnesota in 2004 and is currently being pursued by American prosecutors.

Associated Press/File

This report mixes criticism with praise for steps taken by the church over the last decade to combat abuse.

Sharon Rabbi Barry Starr.

Man accused of extorting rabbi has criminal record

The suspect in the case has in the past been arrested for threatening to kill a man.

Interim Superintendent John McDonough said academic leaders are already working to remedy many of the problems highlighted, including taking measures to reorganize academic departments in the central office, according to a memorandum that accompanies the review.

Suzanne Kreiter/Globe Staff

Review finds Boston schools in disarray

Academic departments are “badly fractured, distrustful, and lacking a sense of teamwork,” the report said.

Notre Dame, which last played in Boston at BC in 2012, will be back in 2015 - but this time in a “home” game at Fenway Park.

Tickets will be scarce for BC-Notre Dame at Fenway

The 2015 contest will be a Notre Dame “home” game, and BC will likely only have about 5,000 tickets to disperse to its fan base.

The Nation

Barron OK’d for judgeship based in Boston

David Barron, a Harvard Law School professor, will serve on the US Court of Appeals for the First Circuit.

By Alan Fram

The Senate approved a top federal judgeship for an architect of the Obama administration’s legal foundation for killing American terror suspects overseas with drones.

VA chief says he will remain in office

By Ed O’Keefe

Veterans’ Affairs Secretary Eric Shinseki vowed to stay in office and pledged to address the allegations of health care mismanagement.

Ex-defense chief now Boy Scouts president

By Timothy Williams

Former Defense Secretary Robert Gates was confirmed Thursday as the Boy Scouts of America’s new president.

The World

Thai military takes control of country

Thai soldiers arrested a progovernment supporter Thursday on the outskirts of Bangkok. The military banned large gatherings and imposed a curfew.

By Thomas Fuller

It was the culmination of months of maneuvering by the Bangkok establishment to sideline a populist movement that has won every national election since 2001.

16 Ukrainian soldiers killed in rebel attack

Men carried the body of a Ukrainian soldier killed in an ambush at a checkpoint in eastern Ukraine on  Thursday. More than 30 troops were injured in the attack.

By Ivan Sekretarev

Pro-Russia insurgents attacked a military checkpoint, leaving a gruesome scene of charred military vehicles and scorched bodies.

Russia, China block UN move to prosecute Syria war crimes

By Rick Gladstone

It was the fourth time that the countries used their veto power as permanent UN Security Council members to block coercive action in the Syrian conflict.

Editorial & Opinion

JAMES CARROLL

Pope, rabbi, sheik can make history

A worker removes notes in April from the cracks of the Western Wall, Judaism’s holiest prayer site, while a visitor prays.

By James Carroll

The pope invited the rabbi and the Muslim leader to Israel as companions to send a message about the urgency of inter-religious reconciliation.

SCOT LEHIGH

Calling the bluff on charter schools

By Scot Lehigh

Will senators join the House in passing a bill to lift the charter cap — or scuttle a bill that is anathema to urban teachers’ unions?

JOANNA WEISS

The same old script about a gender double standard

By Joanna Weiss

It’s depressing when every situation involving gender gets whittled down to buzzwords and generalities.

Metro

Review finds Boston schools in disarray

Interim Superintendent John McDonough said academic leaders are already working to remedy many of the problems highlighted, including taking measures to reorganize academic departments in the central office, according to a memorandum that accompanies the review.

By James Vaznis

Academic departments are “badly fractured, distrustful, and lacking a sense of teamwork,” the report said.

John L. Allen Jr.

Second UN panel criticizes Vatican on sex abuse

The panel cited several specific cases, including Father Joseph Palanivel Jeyapaul, a priest who returned to his native India after being charged with molesting a 14-year-old girl in Minnesota in 2004 and is currently being pursued by American prosecutors.

By John L. Allen Jr.

This report mixes criticism with praise for steps taken by the church over the last decade to combat abuse.

Man accused of extorting rabbi has criminal record

Sharon Rabbi Barry Starr.

By David Abel

The suspect in the case has in the past been arrested for threatening to kill a man.

More Stories

KEVIN CULLEN

A debacle becomes a teaching moment

By Kevin Cullen

LEXINGTON

Two arrested in threat at Lexington High School

By Jacqueline Tempera

Business

Lahey-Winchester hospital deal clears hurdle

By Priyanka Dayal McCluskey

Lahey Health moved closer to acquiring Winchester Hospital after a state board agreed the deal would help control health care costs.

MIT freshman aims to be youngest to fly solo around the world

Matt Guthmiller, a 19-year-old MIT freshman, is trying to become the youngest pilot to make a solo flight around the world.

By Esther Shein

Matt Guthmiller, 19, plans to see the entire world this summer from the cockpit of a small single-engine plane.

Intel gets help shopping massive Hudson site

Intel Corp.’s Hudson facility consists of more than 1.3 million square feet of office and industrial space in four buildings.

By Hiawatha Bray

The site of Intel’s soon-to-close chip plant could become a biotech facility, a digital data center or a manufacturing site for high-technology hardware.

Obituaries

Barbara Jonic, 66; longtime nurse was ‘natural nurturer’

Ms. Jonic later moved to Sandwich, close to her parents, whom she cared for until their deaths.

By Bryan Marquard

Ms. Jonic was a nurse at Massachusetts General Hospital before working at The Boston Globe, where she headed the health services department.

Prince Rupert Loewenstein, 80; managed Rolling Stones’s money

By Jill Lawless

Prince Rupert helped the band churn their musical talent into mountains of gold.

Jack Brabham, 88; 3-time championship driver

Jack Brabham competed in Cheshire, England, in 1965. The racing champion also helped popularize rear-engined cars on the Indy Car circuit.

By Dennis Passa

Mr. Brabham famously pushed his car to the finish line to claim his first season title.

Sports

BLUE JAYS 7, RED SOX 2

Red Sox lose their seventh straight

 Jon Lester allowed seven runs on seven hits in the first two innings and dropped to 4-6 on the season.

By Julian Benbow

Jon Lester was roughed up in the first two innings as the Blue Jays swept the Sox, who went winless on their homestand.

DAN SHAUGHNESSY

Maybe these Red Sox just aren’t good

David Ortiz and the Red Sox lost all six games on their homestand.

By Dan Shaughnessy

Are these reeling Red Sox (losers of seven straight with an inept offense) the real Sox? Was last year just an aberration?

How NESN has changed in 30 years

Ned Martin and Bob Montgomery called some of the earliest Sox games on NESN.

By Chad Finn

No one saw the first Red Sox game carried on NESN. Now the network is a broadcasting behemoth.

G: Arts & Movies

Diamond entangles ‘Smart People’ in race

By Joel Brown

Lydia R. Diamond’s new play examines the volatile dynamics of race among four members of the Harvard community.

Performance review

Mixed notes from ‘Abe Lincoln’s Piano’

Hershey Felder plays an array of characters in his solo show “Abe Lincoln’s Piano,” a musical meditation on our nation’s 16th president.

By Don Aucoin

Too much of the show’s first half of “Abe Lincoln’s Piano’’ has the feel of a discursive history lecture or a rambling reminiscence.

Stages

Taking LGBT theater to the neighborhoods

Kriss Lynn (left) and Ni Wallace performing with the True Colors troupe at City on a Hill School in Roxbury in May.

By Joel Brown

Theater Offensive is focused on presenting works by artists of color in workshops and full productions all around the city.

More Stories

Book Review

‘The Hoops Whisperer’ by Idan Ravin

By James Sullivan

Classical Notes

Lorelei Ensemble lets its voices be heard

By David Weininger

Movie Review

‘The Immigrant’ and the American dream

By Peter Keough

Movie Review

‘Teenage’ is a jumble

By Ty Burr

Night Watch

Military Ball 2014 at Royale

By Alex Stills

events

Boston-area to do list

By June Wulff

Television REview

‘The Normal Heart’: A shattering war

By Matthew Gilbert

Names

Cast revealed for local Whitey Bulger movie

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

Bill Clinton celebrates with City Year

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

Sharing some ‘Idol’ time with Jason Mraz

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

David Mugar honored by State Police

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

UMass hosts writing program gala

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

Aerosmith’s Joe Perry puts pen to paper

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

‘Departed’ star Vera Farmiga coming back?

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein