Front page

SPOTLIGHT FOLLOW-UP: SHADOW CAMPUS

City sends letters to property owners targeting violations

Fifteen hundred units with at least one serious code violation in the past year will inspected first.

Delmy Lemus is one of the workers attempting to unionize.

Jonathan Wiggs/Globe staff

Workers trying to unionize appeal to Sheryl Sandberg

Employees of a Boston hotel are trying to turn Sheryl Sandberg’s campaign for empowering women in their favor.

//c.o0bg.com/rf/image_90x90/Boston/2011-2020/2014/05/22/BostonGlobe.com/Metro/Images/Familybiking05.jpg Parents buy in to bikes with kids aboard

Called the cargo bike, these pedal-powered behemoths may become the new minivan.

Williams College roiled by report of rape

Allegations that administrators mishandled a student’s report of being raped and subsequently harassed has sparked outcry.

Jeanne Shaheen’s voting record as a US senator is practically indistinguishable from the Senate’s most partisan Democrats.

Getty Images/file

Shaheen has bipartisan reputation, but votes party line

Sen. Jeanne Shaheen’s voting record is practically indistinguishable from the Senate’s most partisan Democrats.

The Nation

Shaheen has bipartisan reputation, but votes party line

Jeanne Shaheen’s voting record as a US senator is practically indistinguishable from the Senate’s most partisan Democrats.

By Noah Bierman

Sen. Jeanne Shaheen’s voting record is practically indistinguishable from the Senate’s most partisan Democrats.

Judge allows force-feeding of Guantánamo detainee

Judge Gladys Kessler said she faced a “Hobson’s choice” in ruling on whether to risk the detainee’s life or subject him to suffering.

By Charlie Savage

The decision underscored the stubborn problems entangling the US prison.

Texas mayor nominated to Cabinet

San Antonio Mayor Julian Castro (left) was picked to lead the Department of Housing and Urban Development. Castro, 39, is seen as a possible candidate for vice president.

By Darlene Superville and Josh Lederman

President Obama selected San Antonio’s Julian Castro, a rising star, to be the next housing secretary.

The World

Putin says Russia will respect result of Ukraine election

Ukrainians visited a memorial in Kiev Friday. The statement from Russia’s president raised hopes tensions would ease.

By Michael Birnbaum, Fredrick Kunkle and Abigail Hauslohner

The conciliatory sentiment raised hopes that Russia will be willing to work with new authorities in Ukraine.

Thai military detains officials, including ex-prime minister

By Thanyarat Doksone and Grant Peck

Ousted members of the former government surrendered to the new military junta.

Right-wing party gains in UK

UK Independence Party leader Nigel Farage said the party is now “a serious player.”

By Stephen Castle

The populist UK Independence Party made sweeping gains in local elections, according to preliminary results.

Editorial & Opinion

LAWRENCE HARMON

Mayor Walsh’s erratic efforts for a diverse workforce

Boston Mayor Martin J. Walsh.

By Lawrence Harmon

Boston needs a municipal workforce that reflects the racial makeup of the city.

editorial

John McDonough’s first task: Attract excellent principals, headmasters

The greatest gift the interim school superintendent could bestow would be the presence of top-notch leaders.

editorial

Rand Paul on voter ID: Speak truth to Fox News

Rand Paul (right) said voting fraud claims might have been “over-emphasized.”

The senator said the GOP “may have over-emphasized” claims of fraud but took pains to clarify that he still supports voter ID laws.

More Stories

letters | brown v. board of education, 60 years later

Boston still wrestling

letters | brown v. board of education, 60 years later

Councilors’ reluctance speaks ill of our city

letters | ‘trigger warnings’ in academia?

There are times when a student’s sensibilities should be noted

letters | ‘trigger warnings’ in academia?

Specter of censorship rises again

letters | ‘trigger warnings’ in academia?

Left with a sour taste

Metro

Williams College roiled by report of rape

By Matt Rocheleau

Allegations that administrators mishandled a student’s report of being raped and subsequently harassed has sparked outcry.

SPOTLIGHT FOLLOW-UP: SHADOW CAMPUS

City sends letters to property owners targeting violations

The City Council will hold a hearing that will focus on Anwar N. Faisal (above right).

By Jonathan Saltzman and

Fifteen hundred units with at least one serious code violation in the past year will inspected first.

Parents buy in to bikes with kids aboard

Katie Starbuck got a workout taking her kids from day care to swim lessons in Cambridge.

By Beth Teitell

Called the cargo bike, these pedal-powered behemoths may become the new minivan.

More Stories

Business

Workers trying to unionize appeal to Sheryl Sandberg

Delmy Lemus is one of the workers attempting to unionize.

By Katie Johnston

Employees of a Boston hotel are trying to turn Sheryl Sandberg’s campaign for empowering women in their favor.

State bill would keep your passwords from prying eyes

By Michael B. Farrell

The measure would make it illegal for any employer or school to ask employees and students to hand over social media passwords.

Boston-NYC seaplane service is landlocked

Tailwind Air Service plans to use two planes from Fly the Whale and one of its own when it begins flights in the summer.

By Deirdre Fernandes

The nine-passenger plane will run out of a seaplane dock on the East River in Manhattan, but will use a terminal at Logan Airport for now.

Obituaries

Anthony Mazzola, 90; editor reshaped Town&Country

Mr. Mazzola helped define affluence and style for millions of readers.

Under Mr. Mazzola’s leadership, the magazine began to reflect the current events and social reorganization then affecting elite American society.

Gerald Edelman, 84; Nobelist hailed for insights on antibodies

Dr. Edelman worked at a Rockefeller University lab in New York City, where he directed the Neurosciences Institute.

By Emily Langer

Dr. Edelman was credited with unlocking mysteries of the immune and nervous systems, and later ventured into ambitious studies of the human mind.

Ernesto Butcher, Who Managed Port Authority After 9/11, Dies at 69

Mr. Butcher, who led the authority in the recovery after the attacks, was later forced out by political appointees.

By Paul Vitello

NEW YORK — Ernesto Butcher — a soft-spoken Panamanian immigrant who effectively took over management of the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey after the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, as its most experienced surviving operations officer — died May 15 in Maplewood, N.J. He was 69.He apparently suffered a heart attack while jogging near his home, his wife, Kristen Peck, said in confirming the death.Among the more than 2,700 people killed that day at the World Trade Center, where the authority had its headquarters, 84 were agency employees. One, Neil Levin, the executive director, was Butcher’s boss.

Sports

RAYS 1, RED SOX 0

Red Sox’ losing streak reaches eight games

The Red Sox wasted seven shutout innings from John Lackey. Kim Klement-USA TODAY Sports

By Peter Abraham

The Sox have lost nine of their last 10 and haven’t had a lead since Sunday.

ON BASEBALL

Red Sox are stuck in an identity crisis

Shortstop Xander Bogaerts walks off the field as the Rays celebrate behind him. (Photo by Mike Carlson/Getty Images)

By Nick Cafardo

The 20-27 Red Sox have been dreadful, pathetic . . . any derogatory adjective you want. They deserve it.

Captivated by Irish hurling, US soldiers brought it home

Eddie Clements was a founding member of the Barley House Wolves. Photo credit to Courtney Selig

By Kevin Paul Dupont

The servicemen were so taken by the ancient sport that they formed a club at home as a means of both recreation and bonding.

G: Family

How a White Mountains trek turned into a survival test

Fallen trees and buried trails created unexpected problems for Eric Mazur and his fellow cross-country skiers.

By Bella English

A combination of bad weather, bad luck, and bad decisions turned an overnight outing into a near-disaster for a Harvard professor and his group.

From the Archives

FROM THE ARCHIVES: The Boston Harbor Islands

By Thea Breite and Lisa Tuite

The Boston Harbor Islands have a rich and interesting history. Various islands were used for coastal defense, as a correctional facility, to house prisoners of war, as a hospital, and as a landing point for refugees.

Dance Review

Boston Ballet glitters in ‘Jewels’

Boston Ballet dancers rehearse the “Emeralds” portion of George Balanchine’s “Jewels” at the Boston Opera House Thursday.

By Jeffrey Gantz

The company is presenting George Balanchine’s triptych as the Boston climax of its 50th-anniversary season speaks to how far Boston Ballet has come in 50 years.