Front page

US lags in airing its old secrets

The failure to release more files by President Obama’s self-imposed deadline is blamed on several factors.

Kayana Szymczak for the Boston Globe/ file 2013

Once-hailed salad bars gone from city’s schools

The school system’s food services program has been shutting down the salad bars as it struggles with financial losses.

Dr. Flo Tseng assessed the flight of a snowy owl being nursed back to health at Tufts Wildlife Clinic after being injured by an airplane.

Treating the wildlife in our midst

Admissions to the Tufts Wildlife Clinic have risen largely due to the increase in proximity between humans and wildlife.

Fuel savings bring worry about gas tax revenue

The rise in both fuel efficiency of vehicles and the popularity of hybrids threatens to undermine the effectiveness of the tax.

Nicole Harvey of Roxbury decorated the grave of her grandfather, Korean War veteran Walter Harvey, at Mount Hope Cemetery in Mattapan on Sunday. Her mother, Robin, is at right. As the nation prepared to honor its war dead on Monday, President Obama paid a surprise visit to troops in Afghanistan.

Jessica Rinaldi/Globe Staff

US pauses to honor, remember veterans

Across the nation, citizens were marking Memorial Day with somber ceremonies, flag planting at cemeteries, and parades.

Pope Francis prayed Sunday at a concrete barrier separating Israel and the Palestinian territory during his Bethlehem visit.

Pope will host Mideast presidents in prayer summit

Pope Francis inserted himself directly into the collapsed Middle East peace process, issuing an invitation to the Israeli and Palestinian leaders.

The Nation

US lags in airing its old secrets

President Obama.

By Bryan Bender

The failure to release more files by President Obama’s self-imposed deadline is blamed on several factors.

Parents raced to try to halt Calif. rampage

A man holding flowers near a makeshift memorial in Isla Vista, Calif. stood near flower-filled bullet holes in the windows of a deli Sunday. Elliot Rodger killed six people and wounded 13 before killing himself Friday, authorities said.

By Adam Nagourney

Elliot Rodger, who killed six people Friday, had been planning the shooting spree for three years.

Lawmakers take VA to task over delays

By Tom Raum

Members of both parties have pressed for policy changes and better management as the Department of Veterans Affairs confronts allegations about treatment delays and falsified records.

The World

Pope will host Mideast presidents in prayer summit

Pope Francis prayed Sunday at a concrete barrier separating Israel and the Palestinian territory during his Bethlehem visit.

By Jodi Rudoren and Isabel Kershner

Pope Francis inserted himself directly into the collapsed Middle East peace process, issuing an invitation to the Israeli and Palestinian leaders.

Pro-European tycoon claims victory in Ukraine

Petro Poroshenko spoke to supporters in Kiev Sunday in front of a board showing him far ahead in exit poll results.

By David M. Herszenhorn

Petro Poroshenko faces the difficult task of trying to reunite a country that has been on the edge of financial collapse and civil war.

Obama thanks troops during Afghan visit

By Michael D. Shear

In his remarks to the troops, President Obama made clear that he still intends to keep a small military force in Afghanistan beyond 2014.

Editorial & Opinion

opinion | mike ross

Pride of Mission Hill

Emmett Grady, 5, of Dorchester, gave his sister Mya, 11, a flower at Mission Hill Playground last month.

By Mike Ross

A string of basketball success stories, like that of UConn’s Shabazz Napier, buoys a broader community.

JOHN E. SUNUNU

Time to let go of Tea Party puppy love

By John E. Sununu

The movement was an interesting story at the outset. But the media narrative shifted and lost sight of a few facts.

CARLO ROTELLA

Neighborhood has always mattered

Children watched from an apartment window as police investigated a shooting scene in the South Shore neighborhood of Chicago last year.

By Carlo Rotella

People have always organized themselves in space by making distinctions based on some principle, such as wealth or occupation.

Metro

Once-hailed salad bars gone from city’s schools

By James Vaznis

The school system’s food services program has been shutting down the salad bars as it struggles with financial losses.

Treating the wildlife in our midst

Dr. Flo Tseng assessed the flight of a snowy owl being nursed back to health at Tufts Wildlife Clinic after being injured by an airplane.

By Colin Nickerson

Admissions to the Tufts Wildlife Clinic have risen largely due to the increase in proximity between humans and wildlife.

Fuel savings bring worry about gas tax revenue

By Martine Powers

The rise in both fuel efficiency of vehicles and the popularity of hybrids threatens to undermine the effectiveness of the tax.

Business ǀ Science

Kickstarter helps revive a film Ansel Adams used

“It turned into an industrial detective story,” said Robert Crowley, founder of New55 Film project.

By Hiawatha Bray

Backed by the crowdfunding website, Ashland entrepreneur Robert Crowley plans to start making a Polaroid-type black-and-white film.

When texts won’t do, send images

Takeshi Idezawa, chief operating officer of Line, a Toyko startup messaging service that uses stickers, social games, and even weather forecasts to enliven the experience.

By Hiroko Tabuchi

Line is among a growing number of apps jostling for control of the rapidly growing mobile messaging business.

Tootsie Roll e-cigarettes? Not so fast, makers told

By Michael Felberbaum

Owners of brands geared toward children of all ages are battling to keep notable names like Thin Mint and Cinnamon Toast Crunch off flavored nicotine.

Obituaries

Wojciech Jaruzelski, at 90; Polish leader seen as traitor, patriot

By Vanessa Gera

General Jaruzelski, the survivor of a Siberian labor camp, was an unlikely servant to the Soviet Union and its communist ideology.

Gertrude Matthews, 105; pianist entertained audiences for a century

As a centenarian, Mrs. Matthews played twice a week at a restaurant in Palm Beach, Fla. Decades ago, she helped raise tens of thousands of dollars for orphans and poor children.

By Bryan Marquard

For a century, audiences listened, danced, or sang along as Mrs. Matthews played piano.

Bunny Yeager, at 85; famed photographer of Bettie Page pinups

Bunny Yeager, standing before a photo of herself with model Bettie Page in 1954, turned erotic pinups into art.

By Margalit Fox

Ms. Yeager helped propel Bettie Page to international stardom as a midcentury pinup queen.

Sports

Rays 8, Red Sox 5

Red Sox lose 10th straight game

Sox left fielder Jonny Gomes and Tampa Bay shortstop Yunel Escobar pushed each other as the benches clear during the seventh inning.

By Peter Abraham

The Red Sox, who are on their worst losing streak since 1994, have scored 26 runs in their last 10 games.

On baseball

Could Sunday’s brawl provide Red Sox with a spark?

Red Sox first baseman Mike Carp (center) confronts the Rays' Yunel Escobar during a seventh-inning brawl. Steve Nesius/Associated Press

By Nick Cafardo

The Sox, who lost their 10th straight game, might be thanking Yunel Escobar someday soon.

Red Sox notebook

Mike Napoli placed on 15-day disabled list

Mike Napoli has been dealing with a dislocated finger, and has a sore left hamstring and right calf. Steve Nesius/Associated Press

By Peter Abraham

To supplement their bullpen, righthanded reliever Alex Wilson was kept on the roster.

G: Health

Advances in melanoma treatment prolonging lives

Melanoma patient Richard Murphy and his wife, Lori, at home in Marshfield with children Jake, 12, Max,14, and Mackenzie, 9. Murphy was diagnosed in 2008.

By Karen Weintraub

A seismic shift in melanoma care – largely brought about by enlisting the immune system in the fight – might eventually be used to treat other cancers.

Finding new ways to fight melanoma

The most recent (and promising) melanoma therapies.

Stage Review

‘Guided Tour’ leaves you wanting more

Vincent E. Siders as now-imprisoned Newport tour guide and mask maker  in “Guided Tour.”

By Terry Byrne

“Guided Tour” opens with an evocative, almost ritualistic bit of movement, as a woman in an elegant robe lovingly caresses a beautiful African mask.

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