Front page

New Mass. law aims to speed repairs to gas leaks

The new measure sets a timetable for repairing lines, and customers are expected to see savings in the long run.

Supreme Court rulings jolt women’s groups into action

Two recent cases have energized Mass. voters, politicians, and women’s organizations around issues of women’s health.

Brian Comrie, an agent who specializes in Brazil and Argentina, met with Grace Cole of Marblehead.

Joanne Rathe/Globe Staff

Business soaring for old-school travel companies

The growth is driven mostly by baby boomers looking for a more immersive experience from their vacations.

A lifeguard sat above the crowd at Horseneck Beach in Westport on Sunday, keeping watch on those who ventured into the water. The National Weather Service issued a one-day warning that rip currents associated with the remnants of Hurricane Arthur were possible at area beaches.

Dina Rudick/Globe Staff

Rip currents likely to return to beaches

The National Weather Service issued a one-day warning on rip currents Sunday, but the powerful currents can be a danger at any time.

Maine Governor Paul LePage wants stronger antidrug law enforcement.

Paul LePage toes hard line on drug crisis

The Maine governor supports enforcing laws over treatment options.

Almost every Friday, President Obama retreats into a quiet chamber of the White House — most often the Map Room or Roosevelt Room — and sits before the microphones and a video camera for several minutes.

Obama holds to weekly radio tradition

In nostalgic defiance of today’s hyper-drive news cycle, President Obama has continued a tradition evocative of the fireside chats.

The Nation

Obama holds to weekly radio tradition

Almost every Friday, President Obama retreats into a quiet chamber of the White House — most often the Map Room or Roosevelt Room — and sits before the microphones and a video camera for several minutes.

By Matt Viser

In nostalgic defiance of today’s hyper-drive news cycle, President Obama has continued a tradition evocative of the fireside chats.

US faces tough hurdles in child migrant crisis

By Charles Babington

The Obama administration says it wants more flexibility to send the children home, but even if Congress agrees, the change might do little to help.

Blaze that killed NYC firefighter started in electrical cord

Firefighters on Sunday mourned the death of their colleague in a weekend fire at a 21-story building in Brooklyn, N.Y.

Lieutenant Gordon Ambelas died after suffering injuries while on the 19th floor of the 21-story building, officials said.

The World

Jewish suspects held in killing of Palestinian youth

Israeli riot police had running skirmishes with Palestinian protesters Sunday and Monday in Shuafat in East Jerusalem.

By Isabel Kershner

Authorities decried the vicious slaying of a teen found beaten and burned in a Jerusalem forest last week.

Ousted from key outpost, Ukraine rebels regroup in Donetsk

A pro-Russia fighter guarded a checkpoint close to Donetsk, eastern Ukraine’s largest city, on Sunday.

By Yuras Karmanau

Many pro-Russia separatists vow a bitter fight against Kiev.

Western officials press for audit of Afghan presidential vote

Abdullah Abdullah said his rival, with assistance, rigged the presidential election.

By Azam Ahmed

Ever since the runoff election, the system has been deadlocked by allegations of widespread fraud.

Editorial & Opinion

JAMES CARROLL

On foreign policy, Obama is succeeding

Syria’s chemical weapons has been handed over to Western governments for destruction, and are currently on the Danish cargo ship Ark Futura. They are expected be transferred to the US-owned MV Cape Ray, pictured here.

By James Carroll

The elimination of Syria’s chemical arsenal advances Obama’s anti-proliferation movement.

OPINION | Jennifer Graham

Party barns: Preservation of last resort

Homestead Meadows in Greenville, Wis., rents a refurbished barn for weddings.

By Jennifer Graham

The “party barn” has emerged as a desired amenity for a certain well-heeled demographic.

JOHN E. SUNUNU

Can a corporate CEO improve the embattled VA?

By John E. Sununu

Procter & Gamble’s former CEO possesses sound business skills, but he’ll be out of his element.

Metro

Supreme Court rulings jolt women’s groups into action

“We are our own brand on the social issues . . . embracing a woman’s right to choose,” said Karyn Polito (left), a Republican candidate for lieutenant governor, referring to herself and running mate, Charlie Baker (right).

By Akilah Johnson

Two recent cases have energized Mass. voters, politicians, and women’s organizations around issues of women’s health.

Paul LePage toes hard line on drug crisis

Maine Governor Paul LePage wants stronger antidrug law enforcement.

By Brian MacQuarrie

The Maine governor supports enforcing laws over treatment options.

Witnesses display allegiance in probation trial

By Milton J. Valencia

Hostile witnesses have been vexing in the trial of former Probation commissioner John O’Brien and his deputies.

Business ǀ Science

New Mass. law aims to speed repairs to gas leaks

By Erin Ailworth

The new measure sets a timetable for repairing lines, and customers are expected to see savings in the long run.

Business soaring for old-school travel companies

Brian Comrie, an agent who specializes in Brazil and Argentina, met with Grace Cole of Marblehead.

By Taryn Luna

The growth is driven mostly by baby boomers looking for a more immersive experience from their vacations.

ReWalk exoskeleton puts disabled back on their feet

Derek Herrera, a paralyzed Marine, uses the canes just for balance; his braced-up legs take nearly all the weight.

By Hiawatha Bray

The prosthetic exoskeleton straps to the user’s legs and uses computers and motion sensors to control movements.

Obituaries

Louise Rossetti, 93, of Saugus; inspirational runner

Mrs. Rossetti, who kept scrapbooks with the results of every race she ran, posed with a few of her bibs and trophies in 1998.

By Bryan Marquard

Mrs. Rossetti, who started running at 50, would compete in more than 100 races a year into her 80s.

Alan Dixon, former US senator from Ill.; at 86

Mr. Dixon conversed with fellow senators Robert Byrd (left) and Richard Lugar (right) on Capitol Hill in 1989.

Mr. Dixon, who served in the US Senate from 1981 to 1993, also had a long career in state politics.

J. Anthony Morris, 95; vaccine expert

By Bart Barnes

Dr. Morris was chief vaccine officer for the Bureau of Biological Standards at the National Institutes of Health and later with the Food and Drug Administration.

Sports

Orioles 7, Red Sox 6 (12 inn.)

Red Sox rally, but lose to Orioles in extra innings

Red Sox catcher David Ross reacted after the Orioles’ Nelson Cruz scored a run.

By Peter Abraham

The Red Sox erased a 6-1 deficit with a five-run seventh to tie the game, but were unable to beat the Orioles.

On baseball

Bad teams don’t deserve All-Star selections

Jon Lester talks remain the biggest topic on this Red Sox team.

By Nick Cafardo

Maybe there should be a new rule: If your team stinks there should be no All-Stars.

ON BASKETBALL

Phil Pressey on guard as roster deadline looms

Phil Pressey made a big leap from undrafted free agent to rotation player. But once again, he’s fighting for a roster spot.

By Gary Washburn

The former undrafted rookie needs to survive a July 15 deadline to have the second year of his contract guaranteed.

G: Health

More doctors order kids to get outside

Carlos Davila (center) and other children take part in outdoor activities at the Pelham Apartments complex in Framingham.

By Karen Weintraub

Area pediatricians are increasingly writing prescriptions to encourage kids and teens to spend time outside.

Music Review

BSO, Fleming uncork new season at Tanglewood

Conductor Rob Fisher and soprano Renée Fleming on opening night of the BSO season at Tanglewood on Saturday.

By Jeremy Eichler

The evening, a tasting menu of musical Americana, was clearly conceived as a vehicle for its celebrity soloist, the soprano Renée Fleming.

Stage review

At WTF, ‘June Moon’ plays a familiar but charming tune

Nate Corddry plays lyric writer Fred Stevens and Rachel Napoleon is Edna Baker, a dental assistant Fred meets en route to New York in “June Moon” at Williamstown Theatre Festival.

By Don Aucoin

“June Moon’’ feels padded and the production is not yet a well-oiled machine, but on balance it’s a treat.

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