Front page

Patrick wants Mass. to host immigrant children

The Obama administration is trying to find places to house immigrant children who recently crossed the southern border illegally.

Brother Jim McIntosh started the texting service for prayer requests at St. Anthony Shrine this spring.

Zack Wittman for the Boston Globe

Friars’ prayers only a text away at St. Anthony Shrine

St. Anthony Shrine has received about three texted prayer requests a day since launching the initiative this spring.

Mansfield school chief quits amid plagiarism charges

Superintendent Brenda Hodges stepped down after complaints that she had plagiarized parts of a commencement speech.

Boston Mayor Martin Walsh said he was shocked to learn that the BRA still keeps most of its records on paper.

BRA left millions in fees untaken, audit says

The audit of the Boston Redevelopment Authority described an agency incapable of performing basic functions.

Israel’s defense system intercepted a rocket Wednesday.

Ilia Yefimovich/Getty Images

Raytheon a key in Israeli defense plan

Israel is looking to Raytheon to take a leading role in producing the anti-missile batteries defending civilians.

The Nation

Raytheon a key in Israeli defense plan

Israel’s defense system intercepted a rocket Wednesday.

By Bryan Bender

Israel is looking to Raytheon to take a leading role in producing the anti-missile batteries defending civilians.

Daily Dose

Niacin drug causes serious side effects, study finds

By Deborah Kotz

An experimental drug containing niacin did not benefit heart disease patients despite moderately raising their levels of the “good” HDL cholesterol.

VA chief: Agency has lost trust of vets, public

By Matthew Daly

Acting VA Secretary Sloan Gibson said the VA has created an environment where workers are afraid to raise concerns or offer suggestions.

The World

Cease-fire in Gaza may be short-lived

Emergency workers and Israeli security check a house damaged by a rocket fired in Ashkelon on Wednesday.

By Jodi Rudoren

Israel and Hamas agreed to pause hostilities briefly Thursday at the request of the UN.

Improper wire installation blamed in Russia rail crash

Flowers were left outside a Moscow subway station the day after the crash. The death toll has risen to 22, with an additional 136 people hospitalized.

By Andrew E. Kramer

Police arrested a senior track foreman and his assistant in relation to the crash.

Assad sworn in for third term as Syrian president

President Bashar Assad appeared relaxed and confident during his inauguration.

By Liz Sly

Bashar Assad declared victory over those who had sought to overthrow him as he embarked on a third term in office.

Editorial & Opinion

JOAN VENNOCHI

Validating a rigged Beacon Hill

House Speaker Robert DeLeo defends the practice of recommending job applicants.

By Joan Vennochi

The federal case against three former Probation Department officials shows that it’s business as usual with lawmakers.

NICHOLAS BURNS

A Cold War lesson for Iran

Eduard Shevardnadze gestured during a news conference in 1998.

By Nicholas Burns

The trust and confidence that the US built with former Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard Shevardnadze could be a blueprint for relations with Iran.

editorial

Flap over Haystack reflects broader angst about parking

A new app that pinpoints parking spaces is just one facet in Boston’s parking problem.

Metro

Mansfield school chief quits amid plagiarism charges

By Elaine Cushman Carroll

Superintendent Brenda Hodges stepped down after complaints that she had plagiarized parts of a commencement speech.

BRA left millions in fees untaken, audit says

Boston Mayor Martin Walsh said he was shocked to learn that the BRA still keeps most of its records on paper.

By Casey Ross

The audit of the Boston Redevelopment Authority described an agency incapable of performing basic functions.

Patrick wants Mass. to host immigrant children

Central American immigrants sit atop the so-called La Bestia (The Beast) cargo train, in an attempt to reach the Mexico-US border.

By Jim O’Sullivan and Maria Sacchetti

The Obama administration is trying to find places to house immigrant children who recently crossed the southern border illegally.

More Stories

Yvonne Abraham

The weather we love to hate

By Yvonne Abraham

New Haven

UK man gets more than 12 years for Taliban support

By John Christoffersen

Names

Emma Stone gets a break from R.I. filming

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Water main break floods road in Newton

By Kiera Blessing and Todd Feathers

Business

Thousands of gas leaks in Boston area, study finds

A screen grab of the interactive map created by Google and the Environmental Defense Fund that shows thousands of gas leaks in the region.

By Callum Borchers

Most of the leaks do not pose immediate public safety threats, but an advocacy group is concerned about climate effects.

Ipsen sets up shop in Cambridge

Claude Bertrand, Ipsen’s chief scientific officer, says the firm hopes to grow in Cambridge.

By Robert Weisman

The latest European biopharmaceutical company to plant its flag in Massachusetts has three drugs on the US market.

Red Sox losses mount, but only on the field

Sales at the souvenir store across the street from Fenway Park are better than at this time last year. But if the team misses the playoffs, there will be no surge in sales in October.

By Callum Borchers

Attendance is up from the first half of 2013, and fans are spending as much or more on food and other merchandise.

Obituaries

Joseph Hinsey IV, 82; Harvard professor shared law expertise

Mr. Hinsey was a member of the Harvard Business School faculty for more than a decade.

By J.M. Lawrence

Mr. Hinsey, of Lexington, spent 30 years in the corporate world before coming to Harvard in 1987.

Red Klotz, 93; owned Harlem Globetrotters’ foil

Red Klotz was the losingest coach in basketball history, but considered himself lucky to have traveled the world.

By Richard Goldstein

Mr. Klotz, owner of the Washington Generals, owned the worst record in the history of sports.

Arthur J. Walker, 79; convicted as part of espionage ring

Arthur James Walker was led away by an FBI agent after a court appearance in Norfolk, Va. on June 3, 1985.

By Douglas Martin

Mr. Walker was convicted as part of a family espionage ring that stole military documents and then sold the information to Soviet agents.

Sports

ON BASEBALL

Decisions loom for Red Sox

Ben Cherington will be working the phones this month as the MLB trade deadline approaches.

By Nick Cafardo

Are the Sox in the playoff race or out? They must decide fast with the trade deadline approaching.

CHRISTOPHER L. GASPER

MLB is wasting its All-Star Game

The salute to Derek Jeter at the All-Star Game took a weird turn when Cardinals pitcher Adam Wainwright initially said he grooved a pitch for Jeter to drive.

By Christopher L. Gasper

The game is like a middle school dance. It’s awkward, uncomfortable to watch, and nobody knows how to act.

North Texas city rejects fracking ban

By Emily Schmall

Fracking involves blasting a mix of water, sand, and chemicals deep into underground rock formations to release trapped oil and gas.

G: Style

Call the planner: We need a wedding after party

Dana and Michael Arnold’s post-wedding reception celebration in 2011 included fireworks (top) and treats from an ice cream truck.

By Jill Radsken

The average wedding cost nearly $30,000 last year. With more couples adding after parties to the celebration, expenses seem sure to rise.

Television Review

Big Papi shines in ‘David Ortiz In the Moment’

By Saul Austerlitz

If the Red Sox hero ever ran for mayor of Boston, the new Epix documentary could serve as his campaign film.

Television Review

‘You’re the Worst’: Cynicism run amok

Chris Geere and Aya Cash in FX’s new sitcom.

By Matthew Gilbert

For Gretchen and Jimmy in FX’s new sitcom, throwing insults at each other is a form of flirtation.

More Stories

Television REview

Being ‘Married,’ seeking ‘Satisfaction’

By Matthew Gilbert

Stage REview

Highs and lows from Circuit Theatre shows

By Terry Byrne

Book Review

‘Unruly Places’ by Alastair Bonnett

By Max Winter

Bargain Bin

Put spring and summer in your step at Moxie

By Ami Albernaz

events

Boston-area to do list

By June Wulff

The week ahead: Music

By James Reed

Mark your calendar

By June Wulff

Names

Company claims MacFarlane stole idea for ‘Ted’

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

Slim pickings for Bridget Moynahan

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

Rain doesn’t stop Kids Golf Day at Fenway

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

Did Jerry Seinfeld Yelp about Shrewsbury diner?

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

Shaquille O'Neal, girlfriend spotted in Lynnfield

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Globe North

Aim is for all to paddle together in rejuvenating Malden River

Jonathon Feinberg will coordinate community involvement in the Malden River’s cleanup.

By John Laidler

As officials pursue the goal of restoring the Malden River for greater public use, a new initiative has been launched to ensure that nearby residents can take part.

Rent hikes hit hard on Rockport’s Long Beach

Homeowners along Long Beach in Rockport are appealing new land leases that significantly raise their rents.

By Kathy McCabe

Homeowners on Long Beach in Rockport are appealing to the Board of Selectmen to reconsider new land leases that they say are unfair.

Towns land state grants for libraries

Westford’s J.V. Fletcher Library, listed on the National Register of Historic Buildings, is one of three area libraries receiving state funds to help plan renovation projects.

By Brenda J. Buote

The Massachusetts Board of Library Commissioners has awarded planning and design grants to Lynnfield, Nahant, and Westford.

Globe South

Quincy to buy nine houses for school expansion

Quincy Solicitor James Timmins pointed out a house near North Quincy High School that may be reclaimed to build a parking lot.

By Katheleen Conti

Quincy city officials are hoping to purchase nine homes under what they call friendly takings for the $12 million North Quincy High School campus expansion project.

Duxbury residents persist in raising safety issue at new high school

Duxbury firefighters Kirsten Piper and Dennis Mikkola tested a railing in the new school during a February inspection.

By Jean Lang

Six weeks before the ribbon-cutting at Duxbury’s $128 million middle and high school, two grandfathers are keeping up their safety push.

Private holiday displays on Walpole town land will need permits

By Johanna Seltz

Mary, Joseph, baby Jesus, and the three wise men can return to Walpole Common in November – as long as they go through a new permit policy.

More Stories

Foxborough

Kraft offers to redirect workers on event days

By Michele Morgan Bolton

Behind the Scenes

For director John Sayles, a return to Plimoth cinema

By Robert Knox

Globe South best bets

By Milva DiDomizio

Foxborough

Legal age to buy tobacco products rises

By Michele Morgan Bolton

Globe West

Protests grow over proposed pipeline through Mass.

Katharyn Dawson, at her Groton shop, Second Hand Prose, has had a central role in protests against Kinder Morgan’s expansion.

By Hattie Bernstein

A Houston company wants a natural gas pipeline through Mass. to expand its regional network.

Marlborough basking in economic turnaround

TJX moved its headquarters from Framingham to Marlborough in 2012, helping the city fill up a big chunk of the space Fidelity left behind at its former campus off Interstate 495.

By Scott Van Voorhis

Marlborough is on a roll, with a range of firms having filled the void – and the office space – that Fidelity left behind.

For summer, a focus on shaky classics in Bolton

Patrons of Bolton Public Library’s Cheesy Movie Festival take in 1953’s “On the Mesa of Lost Women.”

By Matt Gunderson

Bolton Public Library’s irreverent movie series aims to satirize bad special effects and poor movie making with a glib canvas of old science fiction movies.