Celtics Live

106

101

Final

Front page

A new age for an old town

Boston is in the midst of a building spree whose enormity, pace, and geographic sweep are redefining the skyline.

In Anchorage (left) 4th Street was barren of snow, unlike Boylston Street in Boston on Valentine’s Day.

Alaskans wonder, ‘who stole our winter?’ We did.

With less than an inch of snow in Anchorage in February, the joke on the streets is the city swapped winters with Boston.

Health connector got it done, but barely; $20m in fixes needed

The Mass. Health Connector needs another $20 million this year and more fixes next year to become fully functional.

Springfield officials point to history in hopes of grabbing Olympic basketball: The Basketball Hall of Fame is located there, where the sport was invented in 1891.

Nancy Palmieri/Associated Press

Smaller Mass. cities clamor for a slice of Olympic glory

The Boston Olympics are being pulled in every direction by local communities who want to reap the economic benefits.

The Nation

Warren Buffett’s message to shareholders remains upbeat

“Both the [Berkshire Hathaway] board and I believe we now have the right person to succeed me as CEO — a successor ready to assume the job the day after I die or step down,” Warren Buffett wrote in his annual letter to shareholders.

By David Gelles

Buffett in his annual message said the board had identified his successor, but did not reveal that person’s identity.

For Netanyahu, Obama, a showdown

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu (left) is bound for Washington for an address to Congress on Tuesday aimed at derailing President Obama’s bid for a diplomatic deal with Tehran.

By Julie Pace

The coming weeks will put the relationship between their countries, which otherwise remain stalwart allies, to one of its toughest tests.

Seattle driving down income disparity

Seattle has begun giving low-income rider discounts, a logistically complicated effort that uses smart-card technology.

By Kirk Johnson

The county transit system for the Seattle metropolitan area this week began pricing tickets based on passengers’ income.

The World

Russia floats theories for rival figure’s murder

The ambassadors of many countries came to the site of Boris Nemtsov’s death to lay flowers Saturday.

By Lynn Berry

A leading investigative agency said it was looking into several motives for Boris Nemtsov’s killing.

Hamas a ‘terrorist’ group, Egypt court says

By Brian Rohan

A civil court declared Hamas a ‘‘terrorist organization’’ on Saturday, further isolating the rulers of the Gaza Strip.

With new deal, Greece won’t seek third bailout, prime minister says

Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras spoke Saturday during a meeting of his Syriza party’s central committee in Athens.

By Demetris Nellas

The prime minister warned that although a ‘‘difficult battle in a long and difficult war’’ was won with the loan extension, difficulties lie ahead.

Editorial & Opinion

opinion | Heidi Wyle

Avalanche safety can’t be an afterthought

By Heidi Wyle

Last year, there were 35 deaths in the US alone from outdoor enthusiasts taking needless risks.

JEFF JACOBY

Spat over Netanyahu’s speech doesn’t change US-Israel relations

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu was invited by US Speaker John Boehner to address Congress next week.

By Jeff Jacoby

However fraught the relationship between Netanyahu and Obama, the ties that so uniquely bind their nations remain.

opinion | stephen kinzer

Putin’s push into Ukraine is rational

President Vladimir Putin.

By Stephen Kinzer

The US would respond similarly if Russia turned Mexico or Canada into a political partner.

Metro

Smaller Mass. cities clamor for a slice of Olympic glory

Springfield officials point to history in hopes of grabbing Olympic basketball: The Basketball Hall of Fame is located there, where the sport was invented in 1891.

By Michael Levenson

The Boston Olympics are being pulled in every direction by local communities who want to reap the economic benefits.

Alaskans wonder, ‘who stole our winter?’ We did.

In Anchorage (left) 4th Street was barren of snow, unlike Boylston Street in Boston on Valentine’s Day.

By Billy Baker

With less than an inch of snow in Anchorage in February, the joke on the streets is the city swapped winters with Boston.

Health connector got it done, but barely; $20m in fixes needed

The Mass. Health Connector’s website needs an additional $20 million in renovations this year and even more fixes next year to become fully functional.

By Felice J. Freyer

The Mass. Health Connector needs another $20 million this year and more fixes next year to become fully functional.

Business

A new age for an old town

By Casey Ross

Boston is in the midst of a building spree whose enormity, pace, and geographic sweep are redefining the skyline.

Was quantitative easing best way to boost US economy?

The US Federal Reserve building in Washington, D.C.

By Kenneth Rogoff

The Fed pumped trillions into the economy, yet there still are many unknowns about the strategy.

Scott Kirsner | Innovation Economy

Drone companies entering Wild West phase

David Avery and Jovan Tanasijevic of the Somerville photography firm Above Summit, with an eight-rotor drone made by DJI. It sells for about $2,300.

By Scott Kirsner

The companies are taking flight even as they wait for the Federal Aviation Administration to adopt rules for commercial use.

More Stories

On the Job

Spreading food truck access far and wide

By Cindy Atoji Keene

Consumer Reports | Product Review

Know your outpatient clinic

Mitch Lipka | Consumer Alert

When choosing electric supplier, do homework

By Mitch Lipka

Job Doc

Premium pay required for some workdays

By Patrician Hunt Sinacole

Sports

Bruins 4, Coyotes 1

Bruins beat Coyotes to win for second straight night

Tuukka Rask stopped a third-period shot as the Bruins finished off the visiting Coyotes on Saturday.

By Amalie Benjamin

The Bruins won games on consecutive days for the fist time since Jan. 7-8.

CHRISTOPHER L. GASPER

Charlie Titus of UMass Boston changed players’ lives

Charlie Titus started at UMass-Boston in 1974.

By Christopher L. Gasper

Titus coached basketball at the school, and had an impact on hundreds of players, for 39 seasons.

‘University cluster’ key to Boston’s Olympic bid

Harvard Stadium, which was used for Olympic soccer matches in 1984, would be the field hockey site if Boston were awarded the 2024 Games.

By John Powers

Campus sites are proposed for nearly a third of the sports, as well as for athlete and media housing.

More Stories

Fluto Shinzawa | On hockey

Patrice Bergeron, Brad Marchand are Bruins’ dynamic duo

By Fluto Shinzawa

Nick Cafardo | On baseball

What should the Red Sox do with Allen Craig?

By Nick Cafardo

NICK CAFARDO I SUNDAY BASEBALL NOTES

Winning isn’t lost on former Red Sox pitcher Jake Peavy

By Nick Cafardo

BEN VOLIN I SUNDAY FOOTBALL NOTES

John Stufflebeem a unique candidate for NFLPA executive director

By Ben Volin

FLUTO SHINZAWA I SUNDAY HOCKEY NOTES

Eddie Lack, Jacob Markstrom ready to save Canucks

By Fluto Shinzawa

Bruins notebook

Coyotes ship Antoine Vermette to Blackhawks

By Amalie Benjamin

GARY WASHBURN I SUNDAY BASKETBALL NOTES

Kevin Garnett’s return to Minnesota a perfect ending

By Gary Washburn

CELTICS NOTEBOOK

Kelly Olynyk closer to returning for Celtics

By Adam Himmelsbach

track & field

Erik Kynard soars to high jump title at US indoors

By Andrew MacDougall

BC 79, N.C. STATE 63

BC ends nine-game skid by knocking off N.C. State

By Michael Vega

HARVARD 80, COLUMBIA 70

Harvard wins, stays tied atop Ivy League in men’s basketball

By Michael Whitmer

UMASS 82, FORDHAM 74

UMass men’s basketball ends slump

By Jeff Wagenheim

BU 6, NORTHEASTERN 1

BU wins Hockey East regular-season title

By Nancy Marrapese-Burrell

Ideas

Will Boston’s crazy snowfalls make people leave?

By Kevin Hartnett

An endless winter has everyone threatening to flee for good. Who might really go — and how it could shift the population.

Who’s poor? Depends how you measure it

By Amy Crawford

Experts say our outdated definition could miss some people who most need help.

The earth’s rarest metals, and why we need them

A worker stripped down a circuit board at a recycling company in Berlin. Computers, among other devices, depend on some of Earth’s rarest metals.

By Chris Wright

A chemist on the high-demand, low-supply elements behind our technology.

More Stories

Uncommon Knowledge

Married people have better mental focus

By Kevin Lewis

Obituaries

William Thomas McKinley, 76; composer

William Thomas McKinley worked on a piece at his home in Reading in the 1980s.

By Bryan Marquard

Mr. McKinley, of Reading, taught for 23 years at New England Conservatory and once chaired what is now the jazz studies department.

Anthony Mason, 48; was bruising NBA forward

Anthony Mason used an elbow to clear Dennis Rodman out of his way during a playoff game in 1998.

By Bruce Weber

Mr. Mason’s play helped the New York Knicks reach the NBA Finals in 1994.

Alan Howard, 77; Shakespearean actor

Mr. Howard played Henry V in a 1976 production.

By Margalit Fox

Mr. Howard’s regal bearing and imposing voice gave life to a spate of Shakespearean kings.

Sunday Arts

Book review

‘Screening Room’ by Alan Lightman

By Ty Burr

MIT professor and author Alan Lightman goes back home and wrestles his past to a draw.

Television

For Timothy Hutton, ‘Crime’ pays off

Oscar winner Timothy Hutton stars in the new ABC drama “American Crime.”

By Sarah Rodman

The veteran actor talks about his role on the new ABC drama “American Crime,” which premieres Thursday, and his vast film and television career.

In Kneehigh’s hands, a mythical love story is so not Wagner

Dominic Marsh and Hannah Vassallo rehearsing for “Tristan and Yseult” last fall in New York.

By Christopher Wallenberg

Director Emma Rice’s “Tristan & Yseult” with the UK-based Kneehigh theater arrives at the Paramount Center Thursday and runs through March 15.

More Stories

Buzzsaw

‘Togetherness’ and marriage on TV

By Matthew Gilbert

ANTIQUES & COLLECTIBLES

Ming goddess, carved birds lead Julia auction

By Virginia Bohlin

doc talk

Lives and times

@ Large

Why texting your parents is, IMHO, perfectly fine

By Michael Andor Brodeur

My Instagram: Holly Darling

By Rachel Raczka

the one thing

Get a grip on knobs

By Marni Elyse Katz

quick bite

Moonshine 152 rises in South Boston

By Devra First

The ticket: pop music

By James Reed

The ticket: art

By Sebastian Smee

The ticket: classical music

By Jeremy Eichler

The ticket: dance

By Karen Campbell

The ticket: television

By Sarah Rodman

Book review

‘I am Radar’ by Reif Larsen

By Nicole Lee

Drawn to surrealism

Helen Oyeyemi

Book review

‘Roosevelt and Stalin’ by Susan Butler

By David M. Shribman

the story behind the book

Josh Cook’s ‘An Exaggerated Murder’

By Kate Tuttle

new england literary news

Diamond girl

By Jan Gardner

seven books about . . .

Seven books on photography

By Katharine Whittemore

Names

Artist, 13, shows works at the Ritz

By Mark Shanahan

Names

Patriots audition new cheerleaders

By Mark Shanahan

Travel

Travel is no vacation when couples clash

By Christopher Muther

Opposites may attract, but that attraction can make for some very stressful moments when deciding what to do, where to go, and how to pace a trip.

Trendspotting: More men heading to the spa

By Jon Marcus

The proportion of spa-goers who are male has shot up from 31 percent less than 10 years ago to 47 percent.

A new waterfront revives the charms of ancient Málaga

By Patricia Harris and David Lyon

This ancient Mediterranean city in Spain has put a graceful modern spin on a stroll by the sea.

Real Estate

3 generations, 3 states, 7 transactions, 1 year

The Rosen family had been anchored in haverhill for a century. from left: emily and andy rosen, grandmotheresther rosen, nate auger and his wife, emily rosen auger (Andy’s sister), and joel and shaw rosen (their parents).

By Andy Rosen

The decisions didn’t come easily, but they reflected the ways our lives had changed over the decades, often without us stopping to take notice.

location, location, location

What is it like to live in Wakefield?

Wakefield’s small-town feel is enhanced by its recreational options, including Lake Quannapowitt.

By Kathy Shiels Tully

“Wakefield has about 25,000 people, but it still feels like a small town,” Nancy Bertrand said.

home of the week

Brookline condo offers elegant woodwork, 2 parking spaces

Bright oak flooring, nine-foot ceilings, and elaborate, decorative molding are among the fine touches in this condo.

By John R. Ellement

The condo is positioned on one of the most remarkable streets in Brookline.

More Stories

my first home

Packing up my childhood home

By Lydia M. Bogar

ask address...

How to handle a moisture problem in the attic

By Rob Robillard

room to love

Designing a three-season porch that enhances the view

By Eileen McEleney Woods

location, location, location

The home your money buys in Wakefield

Magazine

Families

7 things every kid should master

By Susan Engel

A noted Williams College psychologist argues standardized tests are useful, if they measure the abilities students really need.

Families

‘Diary of a Wimpy Kid’ author opening a Plainville bookstore

By Visi Tilak

Jeff Kinney will take a gamble and launch his Massachusetts retail experiment this summer.

Families

The problem with separate toys for girls and boys

Traditionally gender-neutral toys like building blocks now come in “boy” and “girl” versions. 

LEGO’s Friends line has been criticized for featuring hair salons and shopping malls.


illustrations by Greg Mably

By Rebecca Hains

What started our obsession with assigning gender to playthings, and how can parents combat it?

Globe North

Tax exemptions can cost towns

Gillette Stadium in Foxborough is tax-exempt.

By Steven A. Rosenberg

Some believe that exemptions for properties owned by nonprofits leave homeowners and businesses paying more than their fair share.

School districts scramble to make up for snow days

A crew removed snow by the bagful from a flat portion of the roof  at South Shore Plaza in Braintree early last month.

By Brenda J. Buote

The majority of school districts have used all five of the snow days built into their calendars. Some have lost two weeks or more.

Suburban school districts that have accumulated snow days

A sampling of the suburban school districts that have piled up snow days.

More Stories

Globe North calendar

By Wendy Killeen

Business Plan

Possibilities@Work helps small businesses grow

By Wendy Killeen

Local Fare

A European vibe at Salem’s Gulu-Gulu Café

By Katherine Landergan

The Informer

By Erica Moser

Campus Angle

Hao Luong, Malden High/UMass swimming

By Allen Lessels

Catching Up with

Whitaker Hagerman, North Andover/Brooks School

By Allen Lessels

PLAY OF THE WEEK

Griffin Murray, Chelmsford High wrestling

By Sarah Kirkpatrick

Somerville

Somerville establishes affordable housing group

By Katherine Landergan

Wilmington

New Wilmington High school opens

By Brenda J. Buote

Lawrence

Lawrence credit rating upgraded

By Brenda J. Buote

Salem

Salem State may acquire Montserrat

By John Laidler

Region

Nesting ospreys increase north of Boston

By David Rattigan

Globe South

Beverly Beckham

Still enchanted by hats and the memories they hold

A hat and hat stand from the old Foxboro Hat Shop, one of the last of its kind to close.

By Beverly Beckham

I miss the totally superfluous, wide-brimmed beauties designed solely for sitting on top of a head.

Globe South commentary

Notes to Globe South from readers commenting on a range of stories.

What do you think?

Would you like to participate in “The Big Question”? E-mail us at globesouth@globe.com, or call Elise Harmon at 617-929-1540.

More Stories

Globe South calendar

By Robert Knox

Up Close

In Sharon, a yoga master at age 12

By Paul E. Kandarian

Business Plan

BIC Sport in Wareham

By Paul E. Kandarian

Local Fare

Uncle Charlie’s Finer Diner

By Jessica Bartlett

The Informer

By Elise Harmon

On the Move

A Boy Scouts’ camp for all seasons

By Brion O’Connor

Catching Up with

Peter Ambrose, Cardinal Spellman High School

By John R. Johnson

Globe West

Newton mayor seeks other sites for MassChallenge

The former library branch on Centre Street in Newton, where a proposed rent-free deal with MassChallenge has been dropped.

By Ellen Ishkanian

Setti Warren is optimistic he can bring the start-up accelerator to the city, despite scrapping the plan to house it on Centre Street.

Globe West calendar

A scene from “Dryden: The Small Town that Changed the Fracking Game,” is scheduled to screen Wednesday in Maynard.

By Nancy Shohet West

A maple sugar making event, an evening of environmental films, a Beatles cover band, and more.

Business Plan

Sundry offerings at Sudbury’s Duck Soup

Louise Mawhinney went from a long-time fan to a new owner of Duck Soup last fall.

By Cindy Cantrell

Louise Mawhinney was a loyal customer of Duck Soup before she bought the specialty foods and housewares store.