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Texas church gunman sent hostile text messages before attack

A man at the shooting scene wiped his eyes.

Nick Wagner/Austin American-Statesman/AP

■ Devin Patrick Kelley sent threatening texts to his mother-in-law before the shooting, in which he killed 26 people — one as young as 18 months old.
■ During the attack, Kelley fired an assault rifle as he walked down the center aisle during services, and then turned around and continued shooting on his way out.
■ An official said Kelley had three gunshot wounds: one self-inflicted to his head, and two from an armed citizen — one in his leg and one in his torso.
■ The Air Force failed to report Kelley’s domestic violence conviction to the database used to conduct background checks on would-be gun purchasers, officials said.

//c.o0bg.com/rf/image_90x90/Boston/2011-2020/2017/11/05/BostonGlobe.com/Politics/Images/Rex_US_Commerce_Secretary_Wilbur_Ros_9190022B.jpg Commerce secretary has stake in firm tied to Putin orbit, report says

Documents show that Wilbur Ross owns part of a company that does business with a gas producer partly owned by Vladimir Putin’s son-in-law.

//c.o0bg.com/rf/image_90x90/Boston/2011-2020/2017/11/04/BostonGlobe.com/Metro/Images/11-4-17_Mayoral_01.jpg Tuesday’s mayoral election in Boston could approach a record — and not a good one

Everyone is looking for a culprit to blame for what officials predict could be a near-record low turnout.

Judy White’s phone held the crucial evidence — an electronic receipt that showed she did not park illegally in Brookline.

John Tlumacki/Globe Staff

SEAN P. MURPHY | THE FINE PRINT

Pay-by-phone meter feeding goes awry

Since Brookline launched its pay-by-cell phone technology for parking meters, dozens have complained that they received tickets even though they paid up.

The Nation

Texas church gunman sent hostile text messages before attack

A man at the shooting scene wiped his eyes.

By Jim Vertuno, Will Weissert and Paul J. Weber

■ Devin Patrick Kelley sent threatening texts to his mother-in-law before the shooting, in which he killed 26 people — one as young as 18 months old.
■ During the attack, Kelley fired an assault rifle as he walked down the center aisle during services, and then turned around and continued shooting on his way out.
■ An official said Kelley had three gunshot wounds: one self-inflicted to his head, and two from an armed citizen — one in his leg and one in his torso.
■ The Air Force failed to report Kelley’s domestic violence conviction to the database used to conduct background checks on would-be gun purchasers, officials said.

Using tax legislation to overhaul health care still being discussed, Ryan says

President Trump spoke with House Speaker Paul Ryan during a meeting last week at the White House.

By Ed O’Keefe

The House Ways and Means Committee is set to begin reviewing the plan on Monday.

Commerce secretary has stake in firm tied to Putin orbit, report says

Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross testified earlier this year at his confirmation hearing.

By Mike McIntire and Sasha Chavkin

Documents show that Wilbur Ross owns part of a company that does business with a gas producer partly owned by Vladimir Putin’s son-in-law.

The World

Trump opens Asia trip talking tough in campaign-style rally

President Trump put on a bomber jacket before addressing US troops at Yokota Air Base as his wife, Melania, looked on.

By Julie Hirschfeld Davis

The president started a 12-day trip that is likely to be dominated by talks on confronting the nuclear threat from North Korea.

Hours before Niger ambush, US soldiers were targeting militants in Mali

From left: Staff Sergeant Bryan C. Black, 35, of Puyallup, Wash.; Staff Sergeant Jeremiah W. Johnson, 39, of Springboro, Ohio; Sergeant La David Johnson of Miami Gardens, Fla.; and Staff Sergeant Dustin M. Wright, 29, of Lyons, Ga.

By Sudarsan Raghavan

New accounts raise questions about the Pentagon’s assertions that the troops were on a low-risk reconnaissance mission.

Citigroup, Twitter, Lyft: Saudi prince’s arrest touches many

(FILES) This file photo taken on May 11, 2017 shows Saudi Prince Alwaleed bin Talal speaking during a press conference in the Red Sea city of Jeddah. Shares of arrested Saudi billionaire Prince Al-Waleed's Kingdom Holding slide 9.9% on November 5, 2017. / AFP PHOTO / Amer HILABIAMER HILABI/AFP/Getty Images

By Alexandra Stevenson, Anne Barnard and Neil MacFarquhar

With the arrest of Alwaleed bin Talal, the prominent billionaire investor, Saudi Arabia has touched one of the richest and most influential investors in the world.

Editorial & Opinion

EDITORIAL

Too much pain, not enough gain in GOP tax plan

US Senator Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts, outside the Capitol on Wednesday, addressed a rally against the Republican tax plan.

The proposal needs a major overhaul if it’s going to succeed.

Opinion | Margery Eagen

Sucked into the widening gyre of Donald Trump

By Margery Eagan

The impossible happened a year ago this week. . . . The T-man cometh to bully the world.

ALEX BEAM

Impeachment is a losing bet

Tom Steyer spoke at a rally in San Francisco on Oct. 24 calling for the impeachment of President Trump.

By Alex Beam

Billionaire philanthropist Tom Steyer may be overplaying his hand in backing a Trump impeachment.

Metro

WEEK AHEAD

Here’s looking at you, Casablanca

By Leslie Anderson

“The Real and Reel Casablanca” opens at The International Museum of World War II — 75 years after war and Hollywood put the Moroccan city on the map.

Fifty-year-old landmark restaurant in Scituate destroyed in fire

Jamie’s Grille & Pub was a total loss following a fire of undertermined but not suspicious origin, according to a fire official.

By Cristela Guerra

The beloved spot was destroyed early Sunday morning after a blaze started in its kitchen ceiling, according to officials.

High-tech shipping container Portal links Harvard students, Gaza youth

Shannon Boley (left) and Dorie Goehring are curators of the Portal installation at Harvard Divinity School.

By Jeremy C. Fox

When they sat down to talk, the ordinariness of it all was what made it remarkable.

Business & Tech

Building more homes means crowded schools, right? Not so, study says

A study rebuts the idea that housing growth strains schools.

By Tim Logan

It’s long been a truism: More homes in a town means more kids in the schools.

STAT

For pharma companies, GOP tax plan is mostly favorable

By Rebecca Robbins

Biopharma can find plenty to celebrate — and a few things to despair over — in the Republican plan to rewrite the tax code.

Rhode Island asks MBTA for express commuter trains to Boston

A commuter rail train approaches the station in Wickford Junction, R.I. Rhode Island officials would like to see the MBTA launch express trains from the state to Boston — a move the T says would be difficult to pull off.

By Jennifer McDermott

The T says starting express service to Providence and beyond would be challenging.

More Stories

SEAN P. MURPHY | THE FINE PRINT

Pay-by-phone meter feeding goes awry

By Sean P. Murphy

Obituaries

Ed Flanagan, 66, first openly gay lawmaker elected to statewide office in US

Mr. Flanagan was a Vermont state senator and auditor of accounts.

By the Associated Press

Mr. Flanagan served as Vermont auditor of accounts and state senator.

Thomas Segal, 77; brought famous art to his Newbury Street gallery

“I want the best I can get, no matter what,’’ said Mr. Segal, who became a significant force in Boston’s art world.

By Bryan Marquard

Mr. Segal was an art dealer who combined refined tastes and a sharp business background.

Fred Beckey, conqueror and chronicler of North American peaks; at 94

Mr. Beckey, ascending Clyde Palisade, Firebird Ridge in Sierra Nevada, in the 1970s.

By Robert D. McFadden

Mr. Beckey was the first to take hundreds of routes to the summits of North America’s tallest peaks over a seven-decade climbing career.

Sports

BEN VOLIN | ON FOOTBALL

The Good, Bad, and Ugly of the first half of the Patriots’ season

Foxborough Ma 10/29/17 New England Patriots Tom Brady smiles to some young fans on the sidelines before they play the San Diego Chargers at Gillette Stadium. (Matthew J. Lee/Globe staff) topic reporter

By Ben Volin

How is it that a 6-2 team was ranked first in the NFL in total yards and last in the NFL in yards allowed through Week 8?

NORA PRINCIOTTI

Matthew Slater? A trash talker? ‘Yes’

New England Patriots head coach Bill Belichick talks with Matthew Slater about the coin toss before an NFL football game against the Atlanta Falcons at Gillette Stadium in Foxborough, Mass. Sunday, Oct. 22, 2017. (Winslow Townson/AP Images for Panini)

By Nora Princiotti

The Patriots’ special teams ace has perfected the art of chirping without cursing.

CELTICS 104, MAGIC 88

The Celtics passed a test, but Brad Stevens still has a nit to pick

Boston Celtics guard Jaylen Brown (7) shoots a three pointer on Orlando Magic guard Shelvin Mack (7), forward Aaron Gordon (00) and forward Evan Fournier (10) during the first half of an NBA preseason basketball game in Orlando, Fla., Sunday, Nov. 5, 2017. (AP Photo/Willie J. Allen Jr.)

By Adam Himmelsbach

Boston neutralized Orlando’s 3-point prowess and won its eighth straight game.

Healthy Life

Celebrity news

Ben Affleck says he wants to be ‘part of the solution’ to harassment in Hollywood

Ben Affleck was in London Saturday to promote his film “Justice League.”

By Sam Golding

The Cambridge-bred actor said ‘‘more women need to be pushed to power’’ and sexual harassment has to also be ‘‘a men’s issue’’ where guys call out inappropriate behavior.

NAMES

Tapping into generosity at bartender challenge for ALS

From left: Monica Alvarez of Salem and Bryan Driscoll of Charlestown; Jen Buco of Boston, Jock Danforth of Marblehead, and his daughter Kate of Boston at the ALS Warriors of Wall Street Bartender Challenge at Howl at the Moon in Boston.

By Mark Shanahan

The event raised more than $70,000 for ALS research at the ALS Therapy Development Institute.

‘Thor: Ragnarok’ tops box office with $121 million

Chris Hemsworth stars in “Thor: Ragnarok.”

By Jake Coyle

The robust debut for the series’ third film was a welcome shot in the arm for Hollywood and theater owners.

More Stories

TV Critic’s Corner

HBO documentary recalls Rolling Stone’s golden years

By Matthew Gilbert