Front page

A year after the first Women’s March, what’s changed?

From left: Tami Gouveia founded and led the Massachusetts chapter of the women’s march; Lucy Lyman, a 17-year-old, marched last year with her mother; Linda Sopheap Sou works for the Lowell Community Health Center; Lianna Kushi marched while pregnant with her daughter, Ella Kushi-Pouv; Nicole LaGuerre (standing, center) was a lead Massachusetts organizer of the March on Washington; Yvonne Spicer was elected mayor of Framingham; Stephanie Martins ran for City Council in Everett; and Sumbul Siddiqui became the first Muslim woman elected to the Cambridge City Council.

Dina Rudick/Globe Staff

It was a year that brought women a dizzying array of almost daily humiliations and vindications.

//c.o0bg.com/rf/image_90x90/Boston/2011-2020/2017/11/26/BostonGlobe.com/Metro/Images/586113592-5912.jpg Walsh aims to rein in short-term rental market

Boston’s mayor wants new rules to limit how frequently landlords can offer rentals through Airbnb and similar services.

//c.o0bg.com/rf/image_90x90/Boston/2011-2020/2017/05/03/BostonGlobe.com/National/Images/58ae152a-a232-49ce-a125-1f341d99e145.jpg Elizabeth Warren’s Native American problem goes beyond politics

There’s a ghost haunting Warren: her enduring and undocumented claims of Native American ancestry.

The Library of Congress was closed Saturday, one of the early casualties of the federal government shutdown.

SHAWN THEW/EPA/Shutterstock

Government shutdown drags on as partisans dig in

Except for the furiously pointing fingers, Congress moved sluggishly through the first day of a federal shutdown Saturday.

The Nation

Elizabeth Warren’s Native American problem goes beyond politics

enator Elizabeth Warren says now, as she has from the first days of her public life, that she based her assertions about her heritage on her reasonable trust in what she was told about her ancestry as a child.

By Annie Linskey

There’s a ghost haunting Warren: her enduring and undocumented claims of Native American ancestry.

Government shutdown drags on as partisans dig in

The Library of Congress was closed Saturday, one of the early casualties of the federal government shutdown.

By Liz Goodwin

Except for the furiously pointing fingers, Congress moved sluggishly through the first day of a federal shutdown Saturday.

What are the lawmakers in D.C. fighting about?

By the Associated Press

A look at what the parties are fighting over and what some of the effects of the shutdown are likely to be.

The World

Turkish offensive targets Kurdish fighters in Syria

Turkish-backed fighters from the Free Syrian Army fired at Kurdish troops on Saturday.

By Kareem Fahim

Ankara launched airstrikes in northern Syria to start its attack on US-backed Kurds.

Pence says US and Egypt ‘shoulder

Egyptian President Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi and US Vice President Mike Pence at the Presidential Palace in Cairo.

By Ken Thomas

The vice president and the Egyptian president pledged a united front against terrorism in the region..

China says US warship violated sovereignty near Scarborough

Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman Lu Kang said China would take ‘‘necessary measures’’ to protect its sovereignty

More Stories

Editorial & Opinion

EDITORIAL

The good old days of earmarks? Nonsense

Former House Speaker John Boehner of Ohio kissed House minority leader Nancy Pelosi in 2015. Boehner banned earmarks in 2011.

President Trump and earmark revanchists in Congress are selling the public a bridge back to nowhere.

Renée Graham

‘What about Hillary?’ is the new ‘What about Chappaquiddick?’

In 2015, Hillary Clinton waited to testify before the House Select Committee on Benghazi.

By Renée Graham

As the Russia investigation pushes forward, President Trump brings back a Watergate classic.

JEFF JACOBY

In the age of e-commerce, the ‘Quill rule’ is more vital than ever

By Jeff Jacoby

The case against allowing states to exert their taxing power over sellers in other states is stronger than ever.

Metro

Yvonne Abraham

Ethics probe barely alive, as those who spoke up fear Senate reprisals

By Yvonne Abraham

Only one of the four men who made assault and harassment allegations against the husband of state Senator Stan Rosenberg has spoken to investigators.

Cardinal O’Malley speaks out against pope’s comment to sex abuse victims in Chile

12/24/2017 BOSTON, MA Cardinal Se‡n O'Malley (cq) offered a blessing during the Christmas Eve Luncheon held at the Pine Street Inn in Boston. (Aram Boghosian for The Boston Globe)

By Evan Allen

Cardinal Sean O’Malley issued a strongly worded statement reproaching Pope Francis over comments he made in Chile.

A year after the first Women’s March, what’s changed?

From left: Tami Gouveia founded and led the Massachusetts chapter of the women’s march; Lucy Lyman, a 17-year-old, marched last year with her mother; Linda Sopheap Sou works for the Lowell Community Health Center; Lianna Kushi marched while pregnant with her daughter, Ella Kushi-Pouv; Nicole LaGuerre (standing, center) was a lead Massachusetts organizer of the March on Washington; Yvonne Spicer was elected mayor of Framingham; Stephanie Martins ran for City Council in Everett; and Sumbul Siddiqui became the first Muslim woman elected to the Cambridge City Council.

By Stephanie Ebbert

It was a year that brought women a dizzying array of almost daily humiliations and vindications.

Business & Tech

Scott Kirsner | Innovation Economy

Making videoconferences less frustrating

21kirsner -- Owl Labs' videoconferencing product gives remote workers a

By Scott Kirsner

The technology, long more promising than practical, may finally be coming of age.

Walsh aims to rein in short-term rental market

By Tim Logan

Boston’s mayor wants new rules to limit how frequently landlords can offer rentals through Airbnb and similar services.

EVAN HOROWITZ | QUICK STUDY

Talking about an evolution

Boston Fed President Eric Rosengren

By Evan Horowitz

During a period of major transition, the Federal Reserve also faces some big economic policy decisions.

More Stories

TALKING SHOP

Previewing the future of retail

By Janelle Nanos

TALKING POINTS

The week in business

The week ahead in business

By Margeaux Sippell

Sports

DAN SHAUGHNESSY

Brady will play. The Patriots will win. And the rest of America will keep hating

Tom Brady and Bill Belichick at Thursday’s practice.

By Dan Shaughnessy

In the eyes of NFL America, we are the Evil Empire. And we don’t particularly care.

NORA PRINCIOTTI

How the Patriots’ defensive front seemed to get better as the season wore on

Foxborough, MA - 1/13/2017 - Patriot Adam Butler celebrates after sacking Marcus Mariota during third quarter action of the AFC Divisional playoff game between the New England Patriots and the Tennessee Titans at Gillette Stadium. (Jim Davis / Globe staff)

By Nora Princiotti

The team brought in quick studies who listened, rookies proved themselves up to the challenge, and a pair of veterans held it all together.

JULIAN BENBOW

Jaguars saw this turnaround coming

FILE - In this Jan. 12, 2017, file photo, Tom Coughlin talks with members of the media after a press conference where he was introduced as the team's executive vice president of football operations, in Jacksonville, Fla. Fifteen years after being unceremoniously booted by the franchise he shaped, Coughlin is back in the front office, where he has guided the team in the league's second-smallest market to within two wins of the Super Bowl title he came oh-so close to the first time around. (Bob Self/The Florida Times-Union via AP, File)

By Julian Benbow

With a culture-changing offseason, Jacksonville buried last season’s 3-13 record and looked ahead with big expectations.

More Stories

Saturday’s school roundup

Danvers boys’ hockey rallies past Medford

By Chris Bokum

THUNDER 148, CAVALIERS 124

Thunder embarrass struggling Cavaliers

By Tom Withers

PATRIOTS NOTEBOOK

Patriots’ Chris Hogan is back healthy just in time

By Jim McBride

Kevin Paul Dupont | On Second Thought

Red Sox fans now can look back at 1918 differently

By Kevin Paul Dupont

Bruins 4, Canadiens 1

Bruins turn back Canadiens

By Kevin Paul Dupont

NICK CAFARDO | SUNDAY BASEBALL NOTES

Scott Boras likely won’t flinch any time soon, and his clients know it

By Nick Cafardo

GARY WASHBURN | SUNDAY BASKETBALL NOTES

Tony Allen and the value of grinding out a career

By Gary Washburn

FLUTO SHINZAWA | SUNDAY HOCKEY NOTES

The evolution of Ken Hitchcock and Hitch Hockey

By Fluto Shinzawa

Ideas

Ideas | David Scharfenberg

Trillions of dollars have sloshed into offshore tax havens. Here’s how to get it back

By David Scharfenberg

Offshore tax havens are a powerful engine of inequality.

Ideas | Pardis Sabeti

For better science, call off the revolutionaries

Bullet breaking a light bulb, 3D rendering isolated on white background

By Pardis Sabeti

When an entire field shifts, researchers need room to recalibrate their work. Don’t shout them down.

Ideas | Zachary Davis

We need better cynics

By Zachary Davis

Cynicism has a bad reputation, but it has its benefits.

More Stories

Ideas | A.J.B. Lane

Has the movement gone too far?

By A.J.B. Lane

Opinion | Stephen Kinzer

Not all atrocities are genocide

By Stephen Kinzer

Brainiac

Euphemism: ‘Hair cloud’

By Mark Peters

Brainiac

Innovation of the Week: ‘Stock-tails’

By David Scharfenberg

Brainiac

Big Data: 100,000 words

By Alex Kingsbury

Obituaries

Julius Lester, 78, UMass professor emeritus, writer, and activist

Professor Lester (left) collaborated with African-American illustrator Jerry Pinkney (right) on children’s books.

By Bryan Marquard

In the books he wrote, Lester often stepped back to examine his life and the complicated politics of race and religion.

Bradford Dillman, 87, multifaceted and prolific actor of stage and screen

By Adam Bernstein

Mr. Dillman burst to acclaim as the pensive Edmund Tyrone in the original Broadway run of Eugene O’Neill’s ‘‘Long Day’s Journey Into Night.’’

Peter Mayle, 78, wrote ‘A Year in Provence’

Mr. Mayle moved to the Provence region of France in 1987 and the area became the subject of his best-known book.

By Neil Genzlinger

The book relates Mr. Mayle’s and his wife’s month-by-month encounters with local builders, lawyers, truffle hunters, boar hunters, and more.

Sunday Arts

NAMES

Ousted Trump adviser Omarosa signs with Mass. speakers firm

Omarosa Manigault Newman.

By Astead W. Herndon

In a yet-to-be-announced deal, Omarosa Manigault Newman has joined American Programs Bureau, a top booking firm headquartered in Newton.

Annette Bening plays the ‘bad girl’

Jamie Bell as Peter Turner and Annette Bening as Gloria Grahame in “Film Stars Don’t Die in Liverpool.”

By Loren King

The actress portrays Gloria Grahame at the end of the Oscar winner’s life in “Film Stars Don’t Die in Liverpool.”

buzzsaw

These days, just any old psycho killer won’t do

Daniel Bruhl stars as a 19th-century psychologist on the trail of a serial killer in “The Alienist.”

By Matthew Gilbert

With TV churning out so many murder mysteries — including some excellent ones — originality counts more than ever.

More Stories

@LARGE | Michael Andor Brodeur

Google’s Arts and Culture app launches a renaissance of selfie reflection

By Michael Andor Brodeur

Names

More white men to headline Fenway

By Mark Shanahan

Names

Elena Ferrante to write a newspaper column

By Paul S. Makishima

The story behind the book

How would you live if you knew when you would die?

By Kate Tuttle

Doc Talk

Primates, porn, and police

By Peter Keough

bookings

Greater Boston author readings Jan. 21-28

By Robert Steiner

four takes

The not-so-good presidents’ club

By M.J. Andersen

Book Review

Memoir of the Black Lives Matter movement

By Renée Graham

Book Review

Walls rise and fall in ‘Peculiar Ground’

By Mameve Medwed

scene here | Local films, festivals, and faces

Brattle Theatre celebrates female film editors

By Loren King

Travel

Trendspotting

More actors, singers, and athletes are opening their own hotels, restaurants, bars, and stores

Actor Channing Tatum is a partner in the club Saints and Sinners in New Orleans.

By Jon Marcus

It is a happy time for actors, singers, football players, and race-car drivers to open their own hotels, restaurants, bars, and stores.

The VIP Lounge with Martha Stewart

By Juliet Pennington

We caught up with the lifestyle queen to talk about all things travel.

How do the Ice Castles get made, anyway?

An outdoor fire performance amid ice and lights at Ice Castles.

By Kristi Palma

A crew of 40 grew 5,000 to 12,000 icicles per day to create the attraction in Lincoln, N.H.

Real Estate

What is it like to live in Cambridgeport?

By Katheleen Conti

Cathie Zusy fell in love with the neighborhood between Harvard and MIT when she worked in Boston.

What does your money rent in Cambridgeport?

By Katheleen Conti

A sampling of the market in this neighborhood between Harvard and MIT includes a condo with high ceilings and an apartment with river views.

My First Home: A dog of a deal in Atlanta

By Omar Vega

“Knocking on 30’s door, it felt like time to find a nice guy and settle into blissful domesticity.” Read more My First Home essays at realestate.boston.com.

Magazine

Globe Magazine

How Lexington’s Pete Holmes got Judd Apatow’s attention and became a comedy star

“What’s unique about Pete’s character is he’s a believer who’s very sincere about his faith and is trying to find a way to be a comedian but not lose his soul,” says Judd Apatow. “That forces him to question it all because that’s what comedians do — they call bull on everything.”

By Neil Swidey

An affair ended the evangelical Christian’s marriage and made him question everything he lived by. But out of that wreckage came his hit HBO show, “Crashing,” and a new spirituality of sorts.

Globe Magazine

He just graduated from Harvard. He’s also undocumented. Will he be deported?

By Laura Wides-Munoz

Dario Guerrero took his mom to Mexico when she was dying. It cost him his DACA status.

Connections | Magazine

You can learn a lot from kids’ conversations in cars

By Laura Shea Souza

As my daughters chatter away, I begin to understand what my own mom must have been feeling listening to us in the back seat.

Globe North

CAMPUS ANGLE

Ellis savoring his life at Harvard — on ice

By Allen Lessels

A Burlington resident, Eddie Ellis is part of a hockey team seeking to qualify for the NCAA tournament for a fourth straight year.

HIGH SCHOOL WRESTLING

Going to the mat, just like dad did

By Matt Case

At Masconomet Regional High School in Boxford and in nearby Georgetown, the wrestling teams feature father-son combinations.

NOTEWORTHY

GlobeNorth: Noteworthy performances

By Matt Case

North Billerica’s Kassi Abbott has an 8-1 record in goal for SUNY Plattsburgh hockey this season.

Globe South

Former NHL player Kevin Stevens finds redemption from addiction

Former NHL player Kevin Stevens spoke to a crowd of students at Brockton High School in November. Stevens played 15 seasons in the league with the Pittsburgh Penguins, Boston Bruins, Los Angeles Kings, New York Rangers, and Philadelphia Flyers.

By Paul E. Kandarian

Pembroke native Kevin Stevens played with the Pittsburgh Penguins, skating a line with legends Mario Lemieux and Jaromir Jagr. Now he’s a public speaker spreading his message against drugs.

In special mural, joy and beauty come in pieces

Copley at Stoughton nursing home activities director Cheryl Woodward admiring a mural painted in pieces by residents, following its unveiling.

By Hattie Bernstein

What had been 24 separate panels, each measuring 16 inches by 20 inches, was revealed as a whole for the first time in the Copley at Stoughton nursing home.

HIGH SCHOOL WRESTLING

For the Pomellas, wrestling’s all in the family

By Andrew Higginbottom

Marshfield High’s boys’ wrestling team features Tim and Joseph Pomella competing and cousin Matt Pomella coaching, but the family’s connection to the sport goes deeper still.

More Stories

NOTEWORTHY

Globe South: Noteworthy performances

By Andrew Higginbottom

Mark Your Calendar

Vapors of ’90s band to play in Plymouth

By Robert Knox

BLOTTER TALES

Saved in the nick of time

By Emily Sweeney

Bella English

A favorite store closes, leaving a void in town

By Bella English

Community Bulletin Board

Community Bulletin Board

By Zipporah Osei

Globe West

HIGH SCHOOL BASKETBALL

At the Rivers School, Aronson loves to play underdog

By Nate Weitzer

Six-foot-1-inch Tyler Aronson, senior guard on the boys’ varsity basketball team at The Rivers School in Weston, nearly always draws the toughest assignment in the ultracompetitive Independent School League, and he likes it that way.

CAMPUS ANGLE

O’Neil lifting his hoop game, and Bowdoin’s

By Marvin Pave

The Lexington High product is putting up numbers that are top-notch in the New England Small College Athletic Conference.

NOTEWORTHY

GlobeWest: Noteworthy performances

By Nate Weitzer

Arlington’s Phil Leotsakos had 12 points and 13 rebounds to help Connecticut College defeat Fisher College, 79-70, Jan. 9.