Front page

Samuel Brack used a roller to finish off repairs on St. James Avenue earlier in the winter.

David L. Ryan/Globe Staff

In battle against potholes, Boston hits bumps in the road

Boston officials have a goal to fill potholes within one working day of identifying them, but their record for meeting that benchmark is mixed.

//c.o0bg.com/rf/image_90x90/Boston/2011-2020/2018/02/13/BostonGlobe.com/Business/Images/lovecontract1.jpg Dating a co-worker? You may need a love contract

As more women speak out about sexual misconduct in the workplace, some employers are tightening their policies about office romance.

//c.o0bg.com/rf/image_90x90/Boston/2011-2020/2018/02/07/BostonGlobe.com/Metro/Images/PeteSouza_08holdren_01_met.jpg After more than a year, Trump still doesn’t have a science adviser

President Trump has yet to appoint a science adviser — longer than any president since World War II, when Franklin D. Roosevelt created the first White House post for a scientist.

Russia still targeting US political system, spies say

The assessment stands in contrast to President Trump, who has repeatedly voiced skepticism of Russian meddling in the 2016 election.

The front page of The Boston Herald on Feb. 13.

John Blanding/Globe Staff

Digital First Media wins bidding for Herald with $12m package

The Denver-based company, which is also known as MediaNews Group, beat out two other bidders for The Boston Herald with a package that totaled nearly $12 million.

THOMAS FARRAGHER

//c.o0bg.com/rf/image_90x90/Boston/2011-2020/2018/02/14/BostonGlobe.com/Metro/Images/farragher-13982.jpg In Maine, a town on the brink of extinction plots a comeback

The Great Northern Paper Company in Millinocket closed in 2008, the painful end of a prosperous era.

The Nation

After more than a year, Trump still doesn’t have a science adviser

President Obama talked with Dr. John Holdren, then his science adviser, in November 2010. Holdren, a professor at Harvard University’s Kennedy School of Government, is concerned that President Trump still hasn’t named a science adviser.

By David Abel

President Trump has yet to appoint a science adviser — longer than any president since World War II, when Franklin D. Roosevelt created the first White House post for a scientist.

Russia still targeting US political system, spies say

The nation’s top intelligence officials, led by director of national intelligence Daniel Coats (center), addressed the Senate Intelligence Committee on Tuesday.

By Ellen Nakashima and Shane Harris

The assessment stands in contrast to President Trump, who has repeatedly voiced skepticism of Russian meddling in the 2016 election.

Second federal judge orders administration to keep DACA in place

By Alan Feuer

For the second time in two months, a federal judge has stepped into an intense political fight over immigration policy.

The World

Washington is willing to talk with North Korea, the South’s president says

South Korean President Moon Jae-in (far left, front row), US Vice President Mike Pence (second right, front row), and Kim Yo Jong, sister of North Korean ruler Kim Jong Un (second right, back row) sat in close proximity the opening ceremonies of the 2018 Winter Olympic Games in PyeongChang, South Korea.

By Choe Sang-Hun

A confidante accused of collaborating with South Korea’s former president for personal gain was sentenced Tuesday to 20 years in prison.

Julian Assange’s arrest warrant is upheld by UK judge

Supporters of WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange demonstrated outside the Ecuadorian Embassy in London on Tuesday.

By Richard Pérez-Peña and Iliana Magra

The judge’s ruling was a significant setback for Assange after 5½ years of evading authorities by living in the Ecuadorean Embassy in London.

Suspect in truck mayhem in Sweden pledged allegiance to Islamic State

The crime scene was blocked off after the April 2017 attack in Stockholm.

By David Keyton

The suspect wrote that he wanted “to scare the infidels and leave my life,” prosecutors said.

Editorial & Opinion

Editorial

The path of national fiscal folly

James Knable helped to unpack copies of the President's FY19 Budget after it arrived at the House Budget Committee office on Capitol Hill on Monday.

Our new fiscal policies have put us on a path to surpass the post World War II national debt-to-GDP ratio.

Renée Graham

When it comes to race, Boston keeps punching itself in the face

By Renée Graham

Boston is intoxicated with its illustrious past, but the city has a history of failure when it comes to addressing racism.

JEFF JACOBY

The Tea Party is dead and buried, and the GOP just danced on its grave

Globe Staff/AP

By Jeff Jacoby

Republicans have turned their backs on the Tea Party, and on everything the GOP has ever said about fiscal discipline.

Metro

In battle against potholes, Boston hits bumps in the road

Samuel Brack used a roller to finish off repairs on St. James Avenue earlier in the winter.

By Laura Crimaldi

Boston officials have a goal to fill potholes within one working day of identifying them, but their record for meeting that benchmark is mixed.

Adrian Walker

Controversy over Auerbach tweet just reinforces Boston’s troubled image on race

By Adrian Walker

The people who broke the race barriers were the players. Why can’t Boston get that?

THOMAS FARRAGHER

In Maine, a town on the brink of extinction plots a comeback

Community leaders and residents are struggling to prevent Millinocket’s economic collapse after the closing of the Great Northern Paper Company.

By Thomas Farragher

The Great Northern Paper Company in Millinocket closed in 2008, the painful end of a prosperous era.

Business & Tech

Shirley Leung

WEEI loses more advertisers in wake of Fauria incident

A WEEI cohost imitated sports agent Don Yee (above) using a stereotypical Asian accent.

By Shirley Leung

Citizens Bank, the Massachusetts State Lottery, and the Massachusetts Health Connector have cut ties with the station.

Dating a co-worker? You may need a love contract

By Katie Johnston

As more women speak out about sexual misconduct in the workplace, some employers are tightening their policies about office romance.

Digital First Media wins bidding for Herald with $12m package

The front page of The Boston Herald on Feb. 13.

By Jon Chesto

The Denver-based company, which is also known as MediaNews Group, beat out two other bidders for The Boston Herald with a package that totaled nearly $12 million.

Obituaries

Rev. Harvey Guthrie Jr., whose ‘Gospel blackmail’ opened seminary to ordained female faculty, dies at 93

Dr. Guthrie forged the way for women to be added to Episcopal Divinity School’s faculty in Cambridge.

By Bryan Marquard

The Rev. Guthrie, then dean of Episcopal Divinity School in Cambridge, threatened to resign in 1974 if the board didn’t hire an ordained Anglican woman to the faculty.

Vic Damone, 89, popular 1950s crooner and nightclub star

Mr. Damone was married several times, including to actress Diahann Carroll.

By Adam Bernstein

Mr. Damone’s creamy baritone and heartthrob good looks propelled his success at the jukebox and on-screen in after World War II.

Marty Allen, wild-eyed comedy star; at 95

Mr. Allen (left) joined Steve Rossi in comedic routines on stage and television.

By Peter Keepnews

Mr. Allen and crooner Steve Rossi formed one of the most successful comedy teams of the 1960s.

Sports

Bruins 5, Flames 2

Bruins enjoy 2-for-1 special in win over Flames

Boston, MA - 2/13/2018 - (3rd period) Boston Bruins center Patrice Bergeron and teammates celebrate after Bergeron scored his second of two back to back goals for a 4-2 lead during the third period. Boston Bruins host the Calgary Flames at TD Garden. - (Barry Chin/Globe Staff), Section: Sports, Reporter: Fluto Shinzawa, Topic: 14Bruins-Flames, LOID: 8.4.936727948.

By Kevin Paul Dupont

Patrice Bergeron and Riley Nash each scored twice and Tuukka Rask made 28 saves.

DAN SHAUGHNESSY

David Price’s outlook after a tough 2017 season: ‘Winning cures everything’

David Price met with reporters Tuesday in Fort Myers.

By Dan Shaughnessy

The Red Sox lefty said there were things he could have done better, and he believes he learned from the struggles.

Tara Sullivan

It’s Adam Rippon’s world, and we’re just living in it

Adam Rippon performed in the men's single free skate of the team event on Monday.

By Tara Sullivan

The openly gay American figure skater is having the time of his life and reaching out as a role model.

More Stories

BOYS’ BASKETBALL | LAWRENCE 75, LOWELL 72

Lawrence rallies past Lowell for overtime win

By Nate Weitzer

Olympics: Pairs figure skating

Chinese skaters lead after short program

By Dave Skretta

HIGH SCHOOL GIRLS’ HOCKEY NOTES

Currier has captaincy covered for No. 1 Austin Prep

By Lenny Rowe

GIRLS’ BASKETBALL | MELROSE 65, WAKEFIELD 55

A banner night for Melrose girls’ basketball

By Greg Levinsky

FLUTO SHINZAWA I ON HOCKEY

Bruins’ David Pastrnak bumped off the No. 1 line

By Fluto Shinzawa

NICK CAFARDO I ON BASEBALL

Manager Alex Cora will be hands-on with Red Sox

By Nick Cafardo

Women’s Beanpot: BC 4, BU 3

BC tops BU in OT to win women’s Beanpot championship

By Barbara Matson

RED SOX NOTEBOOK

Rotation will have lighter load in spring training

By Peter Abraham

Postcard from spring training

Pitchers and catchers report for Red Sox

By Peter Abraham

Wednesday Food

Let’s quit our jobs and open a food business together!

Jenn and Matt Mason

By Devra First

Wait a minute. Wasn’t this supposed to be romantic?

What She’s having

What She’s Having: Don’t let the drab strip mall fool you — find amazing food at Little India Express

Gobi Manchurian at Little India Express in Lexington.

By Kara Baskin

The Lexington takeout spot is in Commuter Dream World: It’s at an intersection close to Arlington, Burlington, Lexington, Winchester, and Woburn.

The confident cook

Dinner rolls, eggs, and milk become breakfast bread pudding for you and your valentine

Breakfast bread puddings

By Sheryl Julian

Bread pudding should be one of those recipes that you have up your sleeve so you can pull it out whenever the occasion demands.